Mooching Around Devonport Yacht Club + 30yr Flash Back

Mooching Around Devonport Yacht Club + 30Yr Flash Back

The photos above were taken by Glenn Martin at the DYC yard early in the week while out and about on a lockdown bike ride.When I was a member I used to refer to the DYC as the best little yacht club in New Zealand, still is, but they were a tad averse to stepping into the real world when it came to membership criteria. But its a private club, so they can do whatever they want 🙂 From top to bottom:

(L) Seafarer  – 1963, John Brooke – https://waitematawoodys.com/2013/11/25/seafarer-2/ (R) Lady Mary – Roy Parris – https://waitematawoodys.com/2015/09/03/lady-mary/

Castaway – 1947, Dick Lang- https://waitematawoodys.com/?s=Castaway&submit=Search
Ladybird – 1949, Bert Woollacout – https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/04/05/ladybird-splashes/

30+ Year Americas Cup Flash Back

 Things are getting a wee bit crazy in the household, spent way too long today looking for some long lost (I put it away for safe keeping) unframed art work. During the hunt I unearthed a tube of Americas Cup posters, all in good condition and ether A1 or A2 size and most on good quality stock. 30>35 years ago in another life, I was doing marketing for the NZ Challenge, so ‘acquired’ a few items. One day I’ll find a home for them. 

Buying or Selling a Classic Boat

Buying or Selling a Classic Boat
Without sounding too much like Jacinda Ardern (“be kind”) – when people ask me about classic wooden boat ownership, I normally say that owning a woody has a positive effect on your life i.e. you end up forging a life you don’t need to escape from.

So woodys in the interest of your mental well being we have listed below a sample of some of the boats that are currently berthed at the virtual Wooden Boat Bureau Sales Marina. We have a lot of others for sale, some owners request privacy. To read more about the WBB – click https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/12/01/wooden-boat-bureau-advice-for-buyers-and-sellers/
The Wooden Boat Bureau is uniquely placed to offer impartial, up-to-date market information and objective advice to both sellers and buyers. So if you are looking for a wooden boat or considering selling – email us at waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Or call Alan Houghton 027 660 9999 or David Cooke 027 478 1877


SELECTION ONLY

KOTARE – 25′ 1951 Kingfisher Boats

PIRATE – 46′ 1938 Leon Warne

MAKA MAILE – 40′ 1936/7 Sam Ford

KOTARE – 50′ 1940 Millar

MASON CLIPPER – 23′ 1966 Mason Marine

RANUI 48’ 1948 Lidgard

IRENE – 38′ 1955 Orams & Davies


MONTEREY 33’6” 1946 Lidgard


CASTAWAY33’ 1947 Dick Lang

Lady Pamela – 60′ tba tba

KIARIKI – 40′ K CLASS, 1959 Designed by Jack (John) Brooke and built by John / Jack Logan and John Salthouse

VALEZINA 27′ 1937>1958 Colin Wilde

TAWERA – >50′ 1935 Logan


TIME 38’ 2001 John Gander


ASTROLABE51’7” 1971 Bruce Clarke/John Salthouse

Castaway (Islander) 4sale

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CASTAWAY (Islander)
Castaway was built in 1947 by boatbuilder Dick Lang as his own boat. A bridge decker she is 33’ in length, has a 10’ beam and draws 3’.
Over the years there have been several engines (Chrysler Crown > Fordson 6cyl,100hp), these days her power is via a 1984 65hp Mitsubishi diesel (marinised by Chris Moon) that sees her comfortably cruising at 7 knots with a top speed of 8.5.
As launched Castaway was named ‘Islander’ but this was changed c1973 to Castaway. I recall there was an interesting tale around this, along the lines of the word Islander not being very PC 🙂
In the period 1985>1989 she underwent an extensive re-fit that included the hull being re-fastened and a new oak timber interior.
Castaway has been owned for the last 20 years by well known woody – Chris Leech, and cruised extensively from the Bay of Islands to Coromandel and Great Barrier Island. Castaway is now on the market following a ‘consolidation’ of the Leech families fleet. She is a very well equiped classic woody and with her 10’ beam very liveable.
You can read more on her past here.

Oke Bay

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OKE BAY LEAVING SANDSPIT

OKE BAY

Morning woodys, big post today – I owe you a goody – been a little distracted by the A-Cup (how good were we?).

Oke Bay was originally named Diana S & based on the British Registry* Certificates (number 191827, see below) she 32′ long & was built in 1945 by Roy Steadman. *Her registry was transferred to the NZ Register of Ships in Sept 1993. Ken Ricketts sent this all to me & commented that he thought she was very Dick Lang looking.

She was built for a Bay of Islands land agent, Henry Slyfield, who swapped her for another boat in January 1955 with John Lawford, who changed her name in February 1956 from Diana S to Oke Bay, Slyfield owned property in that bay, & used her for transport to & from the bay. John Lawford mostly kept her on a swing mooring in Okahu Bay. He and Henry Slyfield were members of the Royal Akarana Yacht Club. The boat used to travel to the Bay of Islands every Summer holidays.

She is recorded as having a 6 cyl 95hp Kermath petrol engine in place from 1950, given her 1945 build date, one wonders what the original engine was, her present owner advised she had blinded off keel cooling pipe outlets, which hints towards a car or truck engine, which was common after WWII. The Kermath was replaced with a 1965 model 4 cyl Ford diesel in 1965-66, which still powers her today.
Records show in May 1980 she was sold to a Waipu farmer, Arthur Terry. Colin & Annie Mewburn have owned her since May 2004, having bought her off Arthur Terry, who was in hi 80’s at the time. The Mewburn’s motored her down to Whangaparaoa from One Tree Point Whangarei, where Terry had kept her. Terry told Colin M the Ford had 1000 hours on it when he got her in 1980. Home these days is the Wade River. (photos ex Colin Mewburn, Rod Steadman & Ken Ricketts)

She is one of 4 almost identical boats, Castaway, (original name Islander) & Alofa, both of which are attributed to Dick Lang. Ken commented that Lady Noeleen looks like another Dick Lang build, while there is now proof that she is a Dick Lang, interestingly, her present owner holds a view that Lady Noeleen may be the Alofa.

Harold Kidd Input

There are several issues here
1. She was registered as a British Ship in 1955 when she was (allegedly) 10 years old. The Register contains information as given to the Registrar on the application form with no scrutiny of accuracy. There are countless cases where vessels have been registered with incorrect details, often to give the vessel a pedigree it doesn’t have e.g. “Logan Bros” or “Chas. Bailey” as builder.
2. She was registered by Henry Durban Slyfield with RNZYS as DIANA without the S in 1953. The RBS must have contained another DIANA so Slyfield added the “S” to enable registration 2 years later.
3. I think the Diana in the name was his daughter.
4. I can find no trace of her as DIANA or DIANA S or owned by Slyfield before 1953 when she had call-sign ZLCG3. Is it possible that she was built under yet another name?
5. Roy Steadman worked, of course, for Shipbuilders in Poore St during WW2. He would have worked alongside Dick Lang at United Shipbuilders, the consortium formed to build vessels for the US Forces. It is entirely likely that he took employment with Dick at his existing yard in St. Mary’s Bay in 1945 and worked on this launch there, to a design by Dick.
6. I wonder about “1945”. That seems quite a bit too early as there was an acute shortage of good boatbuilding timber after the war as huge amounts had been used in the wartime constructions and large holding stocks destroyed in the January 1945 fire at the mill of Boxes Ltd in Beaumont St which spread to Shipbuilders’ yard in Poore St. Then again, even if Slyfield (or another first owner) sourced kauri privately from Northland, it is unlikely that more than a start would have been made in 1945.
7. ALOFA (W.R. de Luen) and LADY NOELENE (sic) (V. Smith) co-existed in 1953 with different owners so are not the same boat.

My pennyworth