Mystery Napier Launch

Mystery Napier Launch

Today’s photo is another from the lens of Dean Wright, taken on a Napier marina walk-about. Looks familiar but I can not put a name to her – anyone able to help out?

Input from Michael O’Dwyer This boat was called the Graham John when first purchased by the current owner Mark Parvin. Talking to his father Peter, he was told the boat was built by a farmer in Motueka around 1947. Originally 36 feet long it was extended aft to 43 feet when converted to a scallop dredger, hence the appearance of a somewhat droopy stern. Currently powered by a 170 hp Isuzu. Mark has completely overlaid the hull with a ply and glass.

Woodys On The Catwalk

Well almost – Karen Walker in a collaboration with the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron has just launched a range of merchandise celebrating this extra special season – A-Cup and 150th RNZYS Anniversary. WW have supplied woody items – clinker dinghies, model yachts etc to support the collection in Karen Walker stores.

Check out the range here  https://www.karenwalker.com/nz/collections/squadron

Rocky Bay Woody Weekend – CYA Launch Race

ROCKY BAY CYA LAUNCH RACE
Saturday was one of those days that started out looking good, turned crappy (on lots of fronts), got better and then finished average. A gallery of photos above – launch race and in the bay, not a great day weather wise for good photos.
From a launch view point, it was the first launch race in the CYA’s summer racing series and excuse the pun – it got off to a rocky start e.g. start boat broke down and had to call Coast Guard for a tow. Jason Prew deputised me into starting the race, only 4 boats so that was easy. Then 3/4 of the way into the race I got a call from the CYA finish boat, “running late, won’t be there to take finish times”. Bet they weren’t late for the yacht finish…………. Alan Good on Lucille was given the job of recording the times and these were relayed to Jason Prew who calculated the handicap results. All that aside Lucille, Kumi, Ngaio and Meloa all  played well together and crossed the line in that order. 

Handicap results were 1st Kumi – 2nd Meola-  3rd  Lucille (& 1st cross the line)

As a woody treat for the launches WW arranged with Waiheke residents Tim Evill and Mark Stratton to secure access to moorings in the bay for the night – thank you Mark and Tim 🙂 Several more launches cruised down but conditions in the bay were ‘unpleasant’ so they and it would appear a large % of the yacht race fleet, either went else where or headed back to the city.

Along with the mooring access came an invite to attend Happy Hour/s at the Rocky Bay Memorial Cruising Club, with a 3pm start time it was perfect timing for a catch up before the CYA prize giving in the village hall. The club rooms are perched on/over the western end of the bay and a pleasant time was had by all. The club has a very cool, new t-shirt – details at link below
https://www.rockybaycruisingclub.co.nz/for-sale


We had to be back in the city later in the evening, so departed the club around 6pm, collecting CYA secretary – Joyce Talbot, who also needed to be city-side. Trip back was very average but the company was good.
SCORE CARD Weather – 4/10 Organisation – 2/10 On-The-Fly Recovery 11/10 Hospitality – 10/10

RBMCC photos below

Too rocky (rolly) for Centaurus – did a drive by and headed off for a quieter bay 🙂

Woody Classics Weekend – Riverhead Tavern Lunch Cruise

Woody Classics Weekend – Riverhead Tavern Lunch Cruise
Saturday night in Auckland was evil, rain, thunder and lightening – up and down several times during the night, each time thinking – Sundays woody cruise will be cancelled. But once again the weather gods smiled on us and half way up the river the sun came out and stayed out all day. Saturday nights weather scared a few boats off making the trip but most decided to join in via car.

A very pleasant afternoon was had in the Tavern’s Boathouse, which we had reserved for the group. Wonderful to catch up with everyone and to welcome several newbies to the group.Hats off the Jim and Karin Lott who made the trip up the river in their 38’ Stewart yacht – Mokoia. Make a note yachties – sub 2m draft and you are all good 😉

You will notice from the upper river photos that after all the rain, the water was very muddy – worst I have seen it – makes you wonder about all the farm land ‘converted’ to high density housing in the area. When we first started woody trips to the Tavern, most of the surrounding land was either forestry or pasture.


Took a detour on the way back into the viaduct, almost feel embarrassed asking the bridge control to raise the bridge for Raindance 🙂 , to check on the John Spencer / Classic Yacht & Launch gig at Kairanga Plaza, Wynyard Quarter – scored a VIP berth, thank you Tony Stevenson.Not as many photos as normal , for once I spent most of the afternoon chatting, special thanks to Chris Miller who grabbed my camera a few times and snapped some goodies.

WIN A COPY OF ‘THE JOHN SPENCER STORY’ 64 PAGE BOOKLET

All woodys that answer the following question correctly, go into the draw for a copy of the above – As always, entry ONLY VIA EMAIL to waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Q“What was the longest yacht John Spencer designed and built”?

Entries close 8pm 09-11-2020

John Spencer – Champion of the Amateur Boatbuilder

John Spencer – Champion of the Amateur Boatbuilder
For the last 3 days the annual classic yacht and launch exhibition, hosted by the Tino Rawa Trust, has been on at Kairanga Plaza, Halsey St, Wynyard Quarter. This year the star of the show is the late designer John Spencer.  You can read more about John below. 

On Friday I got a sneak review of the event at the opening legendary morning tea, that always sees the who’s who of the wooden boating movement making an appearance.
The show is on today from 10am >4pm, so not too late to pop down.

One of the invited speakers was John Street, now when ever John steps up to a mike – I push record. His words are always outstanding, push play on the video below and you’ll have a chuckle as John relays a few memories of times with John Spencer, Turn the volume up 🙂

Wooden Boat Yard Visit – 50 Photos

New Zealand Wooden Boat Yard Visit – 50 Photos

Yesterday afternoon, Auckland based woodys got to rub shoulders with an impressive collection of classic wooden boats at one of New Zealand’s leading wooden boat yards – the Peter Brookes ‘Brookes Boatbuilders’ complex in rural Waimauku, West Auckland. I have been privileged to visit numerous times but every visit is a treat, where else would you see over eight classic yachts and launches in varying stages of restorations.


I’ll let the photos tell the story, if I have a photo mixed up, let me know 🙂 – enjoy – remember as always if you click on the photos they will enlarge 😉


Amakura II – 1936 Colin Wild, 52’ Bridgedecker


Impala – 1960 Fife, Teak planking 


Matia A23 – 1939 Lidgard, 50’, triple skinned kauri


Kenya II – 1940 Lidgard, 50’, triple skinned kauri. Gardner 6LXB


Pilot Cutter – 50’ 


Kotiri – 1897 Logan


Ladye Wilma B26 – 1895 Logan Bros, 43’, triple skinned kauri


Katrina II K100 – 1944 Bob Stewart, K-Class

Its A Woody But It Won’t Float

Its A Woody But It Won’t Float
They say life goes something like this – Boat > Motorhome > Die

Will if you are in or approaching the middle category the Holzmobil woody motor home would have to be the pick of the bunch. They are built from sustainable wood from floor to ceiling and are one of the warmest motor homes you can find. It has all the home comforts – refrigerator, cooker, bathroom etc + the oiled timber finish as well as smelling nice, allows moisture out and prevents warping.


Still Looking For A Boat Story – 2pm today at Peter Brookes Boat Yard – details below


SPECIAL INVITATION –  A Peek Inside One of Your Best Wooden Boatbuilders Shed

You are invited to an open afternoon at Brookes Boatbuilders, to view the restoration of:

  1. Fife Yacht, Impala
  2. Refit of K class yacht, Katrina II
  3. Restoration of Launch, Amakura II
  4. The many other wooden boats at the yard – Matia, Ladye Wilma, Kotiri, Pilot Cutter, Kenya II (Peter’s own classic launch)

DATE: TODAY

TIME: 2pm-7pm

ADDRESS: 108 Woodhill Park Road, Waimauku, Auckland
These invites only happen every 3>4 years so woodys do not miss out, it will be an amazing afternoon.

Beaulieu River Wooden Boat Gathering

Beaulieu River Wooden Boat Gathering
Today we join the crew over at classic yachtTV when they attended the Beaulieu River Wooden Boat Association get-together at Buckler’s Hard, UK.

It is a great read with stunning photos and words from the very talented Emily Harris. Clicking on most photos will enlarge them. Enjoy 🙂
Hopefully a lot of you will be afloat today enjoying the public holiday.

LINK TO STORY HERE http://www.classicyacht.tv/journal/an-invitation-to-beaulieu?fbclid=IwAR0t3bb2r60BESnqE44izKexo6HXSu5mVDSIROjHFPGvmCAd59Q5J7DyZyU

Maroro + Special Boat Shed Invite

MARORO + SPECIAL INVITE TO VISIT BOAT BUILDER – PETER BROOKES SHED
Thames woody – Brian Thomas, sent me the above photo of his launch Maroro, that he and his son have spent the last 8 years rebuilding at Kopu. Since her recent relaunch she now resides at Thames Marina. The above photo was taken of her from the Thames Wharf Cafe. In his note Brian mentioned a blog that featured the rebuild but I have been unable to trace it or get more intel from Brian, so today’s story is a bit of a ’name & shame’ i.e. hopefully Brian will see this and be in touch 🙂

From the photo it appears to have been a very smart restoration.


SPECIAL INVITATION –  A Peek Inside One of Your Best Wooden Boatbuilders Shed

You are invited to an open afternoon at Brookes Boatbuilders, to view the restoration of:

  1. Fife Yacht, Impala
  2. Refit of K class yacht, Katrina II
  3. Restoration of Launch, Amakura II
  4. The many other wooden boats at the yard – Matia, Ladye Wilma, Kotiri, Pilot Cutter, Kenya II (Peter’s own classic launch)

DATE: Sunday 1st November

TIME: 2pm-7pm

ADDRESS: 108 Woodhill Park Road, Waimauku, Auckland
These invites only happen every 3>4 years so woodys do not miss out, it will be an amazing afternoon.

Amakura II

Will You Be Boating This Summer

Will You be Boating This Summer
Later today, when we hear who the new government will be, I suspect some waitematawoodys readers will realise it’s time to take the plunge, and get yourself, your family, and your friends on the water this summer. 

Without sounding too much like Jacinda Ardern (be kind) – when people ask me about classic wooden boat ownership, I normally say that owning a woody has a positive effect on your life i.e. you end up forging a life you don’t need to escape from.

So woodys in the interest of your mental well being I have listed below a selection of boats that are currently berthed at the virtual Wooden Boat Bureau Sales Marina. To read more about WBB – click below. Links (blue) to each boat also included below. 

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/12/01/wooden-boat-bureau-advice-for-buyers-and-sellers/


The Wooden Boat Bureau is uniquely placed to offer impartial, up-to-date market information and objective advice to both sellers and buyers. So if you are looking for a wooden boat or considering selling – email  waitematawoodys@gmail.com


MENAI38’ 1937 Sam Ford

https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/09/11/menai-a-peek-down-below-2/


RANUI 48’ 1948 Lidgard

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/07/08/ranui-a-peek-down-below/


MONTEREY 33’6” 1946 Lidgard

https://waitematawoodys.com/2013/04/14/monterey-2/


WAIKARO30’ 1978 Roy Paris/Geoff Bagnall

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/02/26/waikaro-cya-riverhead-cruise/


CASTAWAY33’ 1947 Dick Lang

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/06/14/castaway-islander/


TIME 38’ 2001 John Gander

https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/06/01/whats-the-time/


ASTROLABE51’7” 1971 Bruce Clarke/John Salthouse

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/12/22/astrolabe-a-peek-down-below/

The Refit of Windborne

The Refit Of Windborne
Today’s story is on the schooner – Windborne, by John Gander, via Dean Wright, John and family refitted and owned Windborne for many years. Its a great read by one of our best woody boatbuilders. I’ll shut up and just let John tell the story – enjoy, I did 🙂 Remember – to enlarge a photo, just click on it 😉

‘Windborne’ was built in 1928 by Cornish boatbuilders Gilbert and Pascoe at their yard in Porthleven and launched as the cutter ‘Magnet’ after launching she took part in the Fastnet yacht race. She again raced in the Fastnet in 1930 but this time re rigged as a schooner, and has continued with this rig.

On sailing to the United States her name was changed to ‘Huguenot’ and registered in San Diego. On being purchased by the Charleson’s a Canadian family from Vancouver, the owner wanted to retain the name Huguenot and she was renamed ‘Windborne’ a very fitting name for her, and she was Vancouver registered. On sailing her to the U.S. port of Blaine just south of the Canadian border Mike and his wife Karol began getting Windborne ready for a voyage to the south Pacific.

The family visited many Pacific islands during their cruising and then headed for New Zealand and on the last part of the voyage encountered heavy weather and Windborne suffered some damage to her bulwarks and rigging. Being designed on the lines of the Bristol Channel pilot cutters and soundly built she is a very sea kindly vessel and delivered the family safely to Auckland.

Bev and I had not long completed ‘Deepstar’ and were planning on building a large sailing craft for our family use, however time was getting on, so before it was too late and our children left home we decided to look around for a suitable vessel. We were introduced to Windborne on her mooring at Herald Island and went for an afternoon sail with the Charleson family, and could see she was worth and deserved an extensive refit.

Her planking is Pitch Pine on sawn Oak frames fastened with galvanised soft iron spikes, I was not familiar with these timbers in our Picton boatyards so flew back to Picton to talk with Peter Jorgensen at his Waikawa boatyard. Pop as he was affectionally know, with his years of experience in Danish boatyards was of course very familiar with these timbers, iron fastenings and European construction, and his knowledge was very helpful when I surveyed her as I did on returning to Auckland and putting her on the grid at Westhaven.

We took possession on the last day of July 1980 and made ready for the voyage to Picton and with a capable crew we sailed from Auckland on the 7th of August. Winter is not the always the best time to head down the east coast and it was somewhere off East Cape that we found that the forward skylight was only held in place by the shiplap joint and no through bolts. With a couple of sections of bulwarks missing and a good sea running this deficiency was made evident, and the hand bilge pump showed it’s worth. I always sail with a fairly comprehensive tool kit and with a selection of fittings and fastening in the ships inventory the skylight was secured in place.

To undergo the refit I planned, we needed to have Windborne undercover and were fortunate to find we could have the use of Finn Jorgensen’s big shed at the Waikawa yard for a limited time before it was required for their next commission. On the 24th of December we hauled out and made ready to have the masts lifted out, and started the job of burning off the topside paint. As is often the case fastenings deteriorate around the waterline area but it was not possible to pull the old spikes out of the oak frames so additional galvanised ship spikes were driven adjacent to the original’s, two planks below and three planks above the waterline.

On the last day of December ‘Windborne’ was hauled up into the shed ready for the major refit, and what better way to spend new years day for a family than to spend it working with earnest tearing up the canvas like material covering the decks, I was suspicious that this was laid over the 2 inch Baltic Pine decks because of leaks, the ruination of many fine vessel’s. I was relieved to find the timber was in a good state of repair so the decision was made to retain the deck. Removal of the deckhouse was fairly quick and easy but more time was required to remove deck fittings, deck prism’s, and other deck furniture until we had a clean flush deck. The bulwarks were fastened to grounds over the covering boards with the frames extending to the cap, this is an area of potential leaks. On removing the damaged bulwarks and beltings and sawing off the frames at deck level, the new bulwarks were to be fitted on the outside of the sheer strake as was our practice at the Carey yard.

Next we moved below decks, unfortunately in later years any original furniture and fittings had gone to be replaced with ply, paneling and some pegboard, hardly befitting a traditional yacht, however we did expose the original tonnage and tonnage exemption carvings by removing layers of paint from the deck beams so we had something from her past. I had planned the layout we required so removed all bulkheads and the hull lining. This gave a good opportunity to make a thorough inspection from bilge to deckhead.

While I was fitting new bulkheads, Bev and our boys Wayne and Neville, began removing the rigging and paint from the spars. As is common in these vessel’s cast iron ballast is set in concrete between the floor timbers, however she also carried 2,775 lbs of lead ingots. At some time Windborne had been hauled out on a two bearer slip cradle and for a thirty five ton vessel this was grossly insufficient, the result was that she had damage to the underside of her wooden keel, so I made a casting box and we used the lead ingots to cast a blast keel to replace the damaged section. I next dressed off and sanded the the Baltic Pine decking and laid marine ply using epoxy glue to, and over the outside of the sheer strake.

By late February we were ready to start the new bulwarks and to help with our time schedule Finn offered me the use of one of his men, I chose Keith Hansen, Keith had learned his trade at the Jorgensen Boatyard and Keith and I worked well together ( I hope he still agrees with my comment ). We started on the Bulwarks using double diagonal Matai with a hardwood stringer, followed with new hardwood beltings.

Laying the 5/8” teak deck was a slower job, I don’t like decking laid straight fore and aft and wanted to follow the deck plan as far as practical and run the decking into the king plank in the traditional manner and this means edge setting the deck planking. We departed with tradition when it came to caulking the seams and used thioflex polysulphide with the accompanying mess that follows while the product cure’s. Next it was onto fitting the new Teak Cap and Taff rails. The new deckhouse was built on Kauri coamings and sheathed in glass cloth, all other deck furniture is Teak.

As our time in the shed was limited I was fortunate to be able to engage Bob Clerke a ships joiner, I delivered a load of teak at Bob’s workshop, and with measurements and patterns Bob set to and made skylights, hatches, a magnificent saloon table and other fitments to help with my fit out below decks all done in Teak and Kauri. The topsides were recaulked and my daughter Shirley stopped the seams with white lead putty in preparation to repainting. By the beginning of May the new look ‘Windborne’ was out of the shed.

Masts were stepped with an English silver coin dated 1928 under her main mast and a Canadian coin under the foremast, and on the 6th of May at H.W. she was sent down the rails but remained in the cradle, the summer had been hot and dry and we had pumps ready, next day with a bit of oakum caulking in a couple of seams she was ready to leave the cradle and lay alongside the wharf at our boat shed to complete the fit out below decks.

A year or so later I removed the Isuzu engine and replaced it with a 4 LW Gardner. For the following eighteen years ‘Windborne’ carried our family on many adventures in all sorts of conditions. Roger Carey told us boys that wooden boats are built of living things, and every wooden vessel has a soul, I strongly believe this.

This last few weeks I have I have visited ‘Windborne’ out on the hard at Whangarei receiving care and attention from her owner Avon, he is doing a good job she’s looking good, being well ventilated and with salt water over her decks, the best thing ever.