Tawera 1935 Logan – A18

Video below of Tawera at the Mahurangi Regatta – thanks Roger Mills for sharing

TAWERA 1935 LOGAN – A18

Tawera was launched on 30th December, 1935, designed by Arch Logan and built by Colin Wild – you do not get a better pedigree than that :-). 

She was Arch Logan’s last big cutter, measuring almost 50 feet on deck and the culmination of a number of racing keelers built at that time. As the largest of the more modern keelers from Arch Logans drawing board she represented the very best in design development and to this day still epitomises all of the racing winning and wholesome sea keeping abilities of Arch Logans designs.

Tawera is a lucky classic in that she has had wonderful, passionate owners all her life and today is in immaculate condition. In 2003 she was extensively restored and is now considered one of the finest examples of the a keeler of the pre-WWII era. Her owner is one of the Classic Yacht Association’s most loyal members & has loved her as a Logan should be & spared nothing on her maintenance & restoration. Click on photos to enlarge.

Tawera’s owner has an armada of vessels – both sailing and power, some classic and some spirit of tradition – the hard decision has been made to pass Tawera onto a new owner, not any owner, you’ll have to share the passion for classic woodys to even get a peak aboard. Interested buyers should initially contact the Wooden Boat Bureau at  waitematawoodys@gmail.com
I am almost embarrassed to mention the price – it really is a buyers market – $175,000


A WOODY QUIZ – WIN A COPY OF: DES TOWNSON – A SAILING LEGACY
All correct answers to the following question, go into the draw to win the book.

Q: Name (Christian & Surname) the first owner of Tawera.

Entry by email only to waitematawoodys@gmail.com  Closes at 8pm 30/11/20 Read /see more about the book here  https://destownson.co.nz/

Little Jim – A16 – Coastal Classic Race Report

Little Jim – A16 Coastal Classic Race Report

Today’s story and photos comes to us from Little Jim’s skipper and owner James Mortimer and crew – Ash Smith, Rodrigo Salas, Janez Mikec, Max Goutard, Erwann Jooris.

I’ll let James share the story with you, as always – click on photos to enlarge. Enjoy 🙂

“After four long months out of the water at the Milford marina yard over winter, I know that Little Jim had been wanting to stretch her legs and get a good long sail up the coast. She feels fast with her newly reinforced decks, rebuilt rudder, and all over paint job. Or maybe it’s the long winter without any sailing that has made her crew push her along that little bit more.

The weather forecast for Labour weekend had been looking challenging, with light northerlies and rainy weather predicted. On Tuesday night we got together on the boat to go over safety and systems, not at all confident that we would even start the race. Over the next two days the forecast slowly got a little better, with the wind direction moving ever so slightly toward the east. On Thursday night, we made the call to go, knowing full well it was going to be tough. 


Early Friday morning and with enough food and beer to supply a small army, we got ourselves into racing mode and set off for Devonport. There is something special about this race, with more than 150 yachts lining up across the harbour, a sense of anticipation building as the gun gets closer, an adventure ready to start.

We made an early call to cross the channel toward Rangitoto and escape the worst of the incoming tide. Little Jim made excellent ground on most of the fleet who were busy short tacking up Cheltenham Beach in very little wind. A long tack due east across the top of Rangitoto and Motutapu Islands allowed us to finally turn north and lay the outside of Tiri Island and and make some miles to the north. As it turned out, the short stretch between Tiri and Kawau Island was to be the best sailing we would get all day, with a perfect NE’er of 12 to 15 kts, and boat speed above 7 kts.

On any Coastal Classic, there is a decision to make off Takatu Point. Is the boat and the crew in good shape and ok to go on. In any adverse weather this is no small call to make. As all boaties know, crossing Bream Bay can be brutal, and there is no decent shelter until Tutukaka. An easy decision this time, and it was champagne sailing as we passed Cape Rodney. It didn’t last though, and as afternoon slid into evening the wind eased away and turned back north. A frustrating night of slow tacking between the Hen & Chick Islands and Whangarei Heads began, with not a lot of northward miles being made. What the wind failed to deliver the night sky made up for, with an impressive meteor shower, a crystal clear Milky Way, lots of phosphorescence, and an incredible sunrise.

At 8.30am, we made the difficult decision to pull the pin on the race just south of Elizabeth Reef. The forecast was light until afternoon and we had little hope of reaching Russell before cut off at 3pm. 

Ending the race early wasn’t going to put a damper on the weekend though and we spent the next three days sailing downwind back to Auckland under spinnaker via the Poor Knights Islands, Tutukaka, the Hen & Chicks, and Kawau Island. 

Little Jim, built in 1934, was the oldest boat to enter in this year’s race, and it is a fitting testament to the skill of New Zealand’s early boat builders and designers that we can often keep up with boats that are 60 or 70 years younger! 


Can’t wait till 2021”

LITTLE JIM

A16 – bermudan rigged, she was designed & built in 1934 by Arch Logan & Bill Couldrey.
LOA: 42’10”, LWL: 28′, BEAM: 9’1″, DRAFT: 6′

Sarita

SARITA
I have been contacted by Brian Blake in regard to his launch – Sarita, a 28’ possibly built by Shipbuilders. Brian purchased approx. 12 months ago and knows very little about her other than she was kept at Rocky Bay, Waiheke Island. Prior to this she may have resided in the Tauranga area.
In the next few weeks Brian plans to haul her out for a refit that will include re-powering.
Like all of us woody owners, Brian would love to learn more about Sarita’s past – so any help would be greatly appreciated.


Make sure to check out WW tomorrow, we have a stunning photo gallery of the classic yacht – Little Jim, competing in this years Coastal Classic Yacht Race. Tease photo below 🙂


Coming back last night from a 5pm re-launching at The Slipway Milford, I spotted a pod of Orca off NorthHead – that is two sightings in the last month.

Dee 3

DEE 3
Today’s woody bridge-decker was built in the early 1960’s by Phil Lange for Roger Chamberlain of Chamberlains Island and comes to us via tme (thanks Ian McDonald).

Dee 3, surely not her original name?, measures 38’ in length, and is built from 1 & 1/4″ strip planked kauri. Powered by a 130hp 6 cyl. Perkins diesel. 

Currently located in Napier, can anyone tell us more about Dee 3?

Wooden Boat Yard Mooching

Wooden Boat Yard Mooching
Hobsonville woody John Wicks sent me a bunch of photos yesterday from this home marina at Hobsonville. It reminded me that I had snapped a few myself on a recent visit, nice to see that the woodys had moved along and should be re-floating soon.First up the Athol Burns designed, Barney Daniels built – Taotane, which John commented – was being brought back from the almost dead. Then we see the very regal Lady Crossley, the 1947 Colin Wild motor-lunch, out of the shed after a lick of paint and varnish.Lastly above the 48’, 1948 Lidgard built Ranui , in for a paint job, and wearing my Wooden Boat Bureau cap – I have to remind you that she is for sale and ready for summer cruising. More details here

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/07/08/ranui-a-peek-down-below/


Things are getting a tad posh at The Slipway Milford, when I hauled out the other day, instead of a ladder, a set of stairs was waiting for me – much appreciated 🙂

Marline Back In The Water

Post launching – photo ex Max c/o The Slipway Milford

Marline Back In The Water
Back in mid September we reported that the 35′ Leone Warne built – Marline was tucked up in the shed at The Slipway Milford getting a top-chop and the biggest dose of TLC ever. You can read and see photos from the process and lots of historical photos here https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/09/14/marline-gets-a-top-chop/


Last week Marline was quietly slipped back in the water looking rather cool with her back to the past make-over. I have seen a photo of her looking like Huia Falls after being hauled out after a brief – “have we got the waterline right” dip. But she went back in and 24 hours later the flow had abated. Below photos show her as launched and prior to the haircut.

Mystery Napier Launch

Mystery Napier Launch

Today’s photo is another from the lens of Dean Wright, taken on a Napier marina walk-about. Looks familiar but I can not put a name to her – anyone able to help out?

Input from Michael O’Dwyer This boat was called the Graham John when first purchased by the current owner Mark Parvin. Talking to his father Peter, he was told the boat was built by a farmer in Motueka around 1947. Originally 36 feet long it was extended aft to 43 feet when converted to a scallop dredger, hence the appearance of a somewhat droopy stern. Currently powered by a 170 hp Isuzu. Mark has completely overlaid the hull with a ply and glass.

Woodys On The Catwalk

Well almost – Karen Walker in a collaboration with the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron has just launched a range of merchandise celebrating this extra special season – A-Cup and 150th RNZYS Anniversary. WW have supplied woody items – clinker dinghies, model yachts etc to support the collection in Karen Walker stores.

Check out the range here  https://www.karenwalker.com/nz/collections/squadron

Rocky Bay Woody Weekend – CYA Launch Race

ROCKY BAY CYA LAUNCH RACE
Saturday was one of those days that started out looking good, turned crappy (on lots of fronts), got better and then finished average. A gallery of photos above – launch race and in the bay, not a great day weather wise for good photos.
From a launch view point, it was the first launch race in the CYA’s summer racing series and excuse the pun – it got off to a rocky start e.g. start boat broke down and had to call Coast Guard for a tow. Jason Prew deputised me into starting the race, only 4 boats so that was easy. Then 3/4 of the way into the race I got a call from the CYA finish boat, “running late, won’t be there to take finish times”. Bet they weren’t late for the yacht finish…………. Alan Good on Lucille was given the job of recording the times and these were relayed to Jason Prew who calculated the handicap results. All that aside Lucille, Kumi, Ngaio and Meloa all  played well together and crossed the line in that order. 

Handicap results were 1st Kumi – 2nd Meola-  3rd  Lucille (& 1st cross the line)

As a woody treat for the launches WW arranged with Waiheke residents Tim Evill and Mark Stratton to secure access to moorings in the bay for the night – thank you Mark and Tim 🙂 Several more launches cruised down but conditions in the bay were ‘unpleasant’ so they and it would appear a large % of the yacht race fleet, either went else where or headed back to the city.

Along with the mooring access came an invite to attend Happy Hour/s at the Rocky Bay Memorial Cruising Club, with a 3pm start time it was perfect timing for a catch up before the CYA prize giving in the village hall. The club rooms are perched on/over the western end of the bay and a pleasant time was had by all. The club has a very cool, new t-shirt – details at link below
https://www.rockybaycruisingclub.co.nz/for-sale


We had to be back in the city later in the evening, so departed the club around 6pm, collecting CYA secretary – Joyce Talbot, who also needed to be city-side. Trip back was very average but the company was good.
SCORE CARD Weather – 4/10 Organisation – 2/10 On-The-Fly Recovery 11/10 Hospitality – 10/10

RBMCC photos below

Too rocky (rolly) for Centaurus – did a drive by and headed off for a quieter bay 🙂

Mystery Napier Launch

Mystery Napier Launch
Bay of Islands woody – Dean Wright, recently escaped the winter-less north and has been mooching around the Napier marina. Dean spotted the very streamlined looking launch above, can anyone tell us about the boat?

Input from Michael O’Dwyer – its called Phoebe (Imp) and appeared on WW back in 2015 https://waitematawoodys.com/2015/12/22/phoebe-imp/


Dean also snapped the photo below of the Napier Sailing Club’s patrol boat – someone has a very good idea for fitting a boat out , well done, she is a looker.

Input from Michael O’Dwyer The Watchman was built in Dunedin around 1955 especially for the Napier Sailing Club. She has conducted patrol duties ever since. A club stalwart, she received a well earned makeover a couple of years ago.

TUI – Clinker Steam Boat

SS TUI – Kauri Clinker Steam Boat
It thought that Tui’s 15’ kauri clinker hull was built c.1920, then as part of her transformation to a steam boat the hull was restored where necessary and the exterior was fully clad in f/glass.For the steam boys I have reproduced the mechanical specs below from her tme listing (thanks Ian McDonald):

The boiler is of the Ofeldt type with a 6mm thick steel central drum and has 12 1/2″ copper coils surrounding it. The boiler is fast steaming, reliable and safe. Stainless steel cladding and stainless steel funnel. The steel firebox with adjustable dampers runs on char, coal and wood.

The 2hp engine is by Wayne Larsen and is single cylinder double acting 2.5″‘bore x 2.75″ stroke. It has a balanced crankshaft and semi balanced slide valve, with Stephenson’s reversing gear, twin boiler water pumps and a vacuum pump with exhaust steam passing through a feed water heater and keel condenser to the stainless steel hot well. The propeller is 14.5″ x 23″

An auxiliary boiler hand pump and is fitted with an electric water pump as a backup. A Stainless steel top-up water tank is in the transom with a stainless steel hot well placed just in front of the Boiler. A Steam bilge ejector is fitted for removal of any bilge water.

She is fitted with a Windermere Kettle to allow the crew to make a hot cup of tea/coffee on the run.