Takitimu


TAKITIMU

AIan Sexton took the above photos of the Owen Woolley built ‘Takitimu’ at Whangaroa. Takitimu was launched in 1975 for the then GM of NZ Forest Products, Doug Walker. She is 42′ and was powered with a horizontal 250hp Volvo, possibly still is looking at the smoke coming from her 🙂

The Walkers started boating the same time as Alan, their first launch was Gay Dawn in 1971, a couple of years later they purchased the Woolley Karere II, followed by Takitimu. They owned Takitimu for approx 10yrs then downsized to a 10.5m Woolley flybridge launch. Doug’s son Paul later ran the Woolley launch Alchemy in charter.
The only change to Takitimu since launching is the raised flybridge windscreen and solid canopy.

 

Clinker Day Boat Project


CLINKER DAY BOAT PROJECT

We do not know the original design & build date for the above 4.2m clinker day-boat style launch but it has had nearly all her timbers replaced during rebuild which included new deck, coaming, transom, keel, oak ribs, stringers, bulkhead, topsides of planking, and beltings. So woodys almost a new boat. There are some interesting woodwork skills on show 🙂
In the interests of reduced maintenance she has been fiberglassed, hopefully to eliminate shrinking and leaking of seams. The trailer looks all good but just needs WOF / Rego.

There is a 10hp Bukh diesel in place that needs the installation finished off and some seating fitted. With trademe bidding starting at its $5k its got lake boat project written all over it.

 

 

Norita


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NORITA

Norita started life in 199 as a replica steam launch but was later converted to diesel – a 29hp Yanmar 3YM30 diesel pushes her along. She measure 30′ with a 7’6″ beam.Their boiler is not functional but the rest of the steam engine is still fitted. She is 4sale on trademe, buy her & install a little dry ice > smoke generator in her funnel & use her to take unsuspecting tourists for waterfront cruises.

So the question of the day is direct at Russell Ward who will be able to tell us more about S.L. Norita

Input from Daniel Hicks

The story of Norita and her ‘sister ship’ Eliza Hobson is definitely an interesting one, and is a perfect demonstration of the romance of traditional boats overtaking reality. The story began in 1996, when Alan Brimblecombe was looking for somewhere to work on Swan. A local Warkworth boat building start up, Willis Glenn Marine offered him space in their Hudson Road shed. While working on Swan one afternoon, he invited the company owners for a ride on Zeltic, then his active steam launch. They were enthralled by it. Alan commented that a slightly bigger vessel, of about 30 feet could possibly be a saleable item. Amazingly, a few days later they came to him and suggested that they could start building steamboats, but they needed guidance. At this point Alan suggested that a slightly stretched version of Puke be built, 30 feet instead of 26 with a suitably sized compound engine running at low revs, and a cabin to allow for inclement weather. Alan drew up a profile view of the vessel, gave them Puke’s lines and got on with his work.

A few days later they popped the computer drawn design in front of him, but boy oh boy, it wasn’t what he’d suggested. Suddenly the boat had gained full headroom and had grown in beam by about a foot, but the real issue was below the waterline, Puke’s beautiful hull had been lost to something that more closely resembled a wineglass, ie the buoyancy was very high up, with a fine deep hull underneath. Despite protestations that it wasn’t a steamboat hull, they said they were going to build it! The hull design really bears very little resemblance to Puke, or any other steamboat for that matter. The plug was started, and Zeltic was brought into the workshop for a cosmetic refurbishment before being taken to the boat show. A lovely full colour brochure was produced, and Zeltic was set up at the boat show, providing steam to the steambox while the boat builders re-ribbed Alans longboat. Zeltic was awarded best in show display. At the show, three orders were placed (although I suspect there were only two actual orders, the third being a friend of Willis). Alfie Des Tombes ordered boat number one (Norita), and Alan Lambourne ordered boat number two (Eliza Hobson) for commercial use.

Work started on the boats with a planned delivery of boat number 1 on the 21st of December in Wellington (to be launched by the floating steam crane Hikitia) with Eliza Hobson to be commissioned on Boxing Day at the Maritime Museum in Auckland. Unfortunately reality was very different, and as December approached it was obvious that two boats weren’t going to be ready, one being a possibility. It was decided that the best publicity would be achieved by launching Eliza Hobson first, so Norita was sidelined and a huge push was made to get Eliza in action. With the boiler in place, and most of the engine mounted, the boat was lowered into the water at West Harbour Marina, where she promptly lay over on her beam ends! The computer calculations had said that she needed ballast, but the builders believed that she didn’t need it as the machinery would weigh her down (had they built a stretched Puke this would be the case). The engineers were dispatched to get plenty of pig iron and put it in the bilges. Two days later, and on an even keel, she was towed by John Hager in Matui into the museum for “commissioning”, the engineers having been unable to finish her in time. She was towed to Warkworth, finished off and put through Marine Department survey. With the correct amount of lead in the bilge, she passed her stability test. The only real issue was that the propeller designed for her by Henleys was totally wrong, and she could only do 4.5 knots. Later on a correct sized prop was made and fitted and she worked reasonably well, although the machinery space was made unnecessarily tight due to the proximity of the head compartment (which was right beside the boiler).

With Eliza Hobson delivered, Norita stood a chance of being finished, but then Willis Glenn Marine went into liquidation, building steamboats didn’t actually pay! About this time Eliza Hobson was put into a violent roll by a ferry off Browns Island, sufficient to rolls the drawers out and spill coal from her bunker. Despite the stability calculation, those who had no experience with tender vessels declared she was dangerous, and she was taken out of action and taken to the engineers to be rebuilt. A new hull was grafted onto the outside of the old hull, the head removed, the machinery moved forward and work headed towards a much fatter Eliza Hobson. The hull was subsequently moved to Kevin Johnstones yard in Devonport, and was replaced by Norita. Eliza Hobson re-entered survey with a much larger machinery space, but no forward cabin seating.

The engineers convinced Alfie to build a new set of machinery for Norita, a water tube boiler and smaller twin simple engine, the aim being to give her a lower centre of gravity and less machinery weight than Eliza Hobson, as Alan had convinced Alfie not to have the hull widened. Like Eliza, Norita lost her forward cabin accommodation, the space being taken up her large water tube boiler, with the engine now beside the still extent head compartment. The coal bunker was now located under the foredeck hatch. Norita was launched at Gulf Harbour in early 1999, and both she and Eliza Hobson were both together at Clevedon for that years Auckland Steam Engine Society Clevedon Steam Meet, along with Zeltic, the inspiration for them. Norita was subsequently shipped to Wellington, and used by Alfie for dignified day cruises in the inner harbour.

To finish the story off, Eliza underwent another rebuild of her machinery in Warkworth in about 2002, and we steamed her north to the Bay of Islands in an epic 26 hours of steaming over two days. Alan Lambourne eventually tired of her, and sold her on. She is I believe currently dead on the Waikato River, her new owner having run the boiler out of water. Norita eventually suffered from a few leaking boiler tubes due to corrosion (probably due to rain down her funnel), and the boiler was removed, the engine moved forward and the diesel fitted in its place. The boiler is at Steam and Machinery in Wanganui, and may be rebuild-able, Colonial Ironworks have a partly completed identical boiler. Of the original machinery partly built for Norita, the boiler is now in use in Puke, and the reversing gear from the engine is on the engine in Greenbank.

Norita could be put back into steam, and be a good steam launch, and Eliza with a new or rebuilt boiler would also be good. Both boats worked in their finished forms. I’m certain that Norita would have worked well with the original machinery, I very much doubt it was much heavier than what went into her (and I know the weights of Eliza’s machinery), and she would have been both fast and economical. Eliza definitely needed the bigger machinery in her final form, being a much heavier and less slippery hull.

Hopefully someone gets hold of Norita and does her justice, a few tweaks could make her a lot prettier, and if they don’t want the machinery, new homes could be found for it.

A Woody Weekend To Remember


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Jason Prew & George Renall aboard Wairiki

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A Woody Weekend To Remember

I mentioned in yesterdays story, the weekend was just one out of the bag – just magnificent on all fronts.
A few CYA stalwarts headed out on Saturday for an overnighter at Administration Bay, Motutapu Island. The photos above from the combined cameras (more likely iPhones) of Jason Prew, Steve White & Dan Rendall show the yachts – Wairiki & Jonquil & the launch Lucinda. The young crew member in a few photos is Dan Rendall’s son – George, who already has his own P-Class (refer below photos a few weeks ago of the re-launch)
Enjoy the photo spread – they are rather good photos.

(included are a few random pics of other classics that were out enjoying the weekend)

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Arawa


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ARAWA

The above 45′ Gladden pilot house bridge-decker was built in 1972. Powered by twin Ford 180hp diesels that get her along at 10>14 knots. Thats about all I know, photos ex trademe.

Can anyone put a name to her & some history? (see comments section – lots of info there )

Sorry about the poor image used as the main photo but that was all there was available.

Photos below ex Brian Worthington & Ken Ricketts

 

WAITOA – Sailing Sunday


WAITOA

WAITOA – Sailing Sunday

Waitoa is a yacht from Ken Ricketts childhood,the  photo above was taken by him in Islington Bay, during a night stopover on route to Kawau Island pre Christmas 1952.Ken recalls she was an F class but is unsure of the designer / builder. She may have been a Woollacott, but she doesn’t show on the Woollacott list.
When Ken knew the yacht (1955-60’s) she was owned by Fred McGehan of Mt Albert. Ken sailed to Kawau on her once at Christmas c1953-55, to catch up with his parents on the family launch Juliana.
Any of the woodys able to advise more details on Waitoa & what became of her?

Harold Kidd Input – 28 footer WAITOA F10 des. Bob Stewart built by Phil Barton 1947-8, so she’s a good ‘un. I saw her in 2005 at Nelson.

GOING TOPLESS

I was recently sent the photos below from Bob Cofer who resides in Bellingham, Washington, USA. Bob pro-formed a top chop on his 1972 Grand Banks ‘Ebbtide’ – if you ever need proof that going topless is the cool thing to do – check out the before & after shots 😉

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Hoani


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HOANI

I was contacted recently by John Managh whose father (Keith Managh*) bought the 36′ Hoani from Charley Turner in October 1979, Charley designed & built her over a 15 year period in Coromandel. Charley was ‘just’ going to build a little fishing boat for himself and his mate but she grew in size & build time 🙂 He wanted to call the boat Joanne after his granddaughter. However he thought Joanne was much to common a boat name. So he asked a local what the Maori translation for Joanne was and he told her Hoani. So that is how she got her name. Quite some time later it was discovered that Hoani is actually John in Maori.
John recently found Hoani’s original log book, below are the first three pages that give us an insight into her specs, launch day & first cruise.

From the photos above you can see she is a straight sedan top launch. A year after the family bought her, Keith took her to Salthouses. They did an extensive reno to make her suitable for a family of seven. Keith told the story that he gave Salthouses the list of all the stuff that he wanted in the boat. They said ‘you need a 45″ boat’. Dad said ‘you will do it…’ And they did.

John would love to know where she is now & hopefully get the chance to view her.

*A little about Keith Managh. He was a sawmiller in Thames. Owned what was called then Thames Sawmilling Company that is now called Thames Timber. He unfortunately passed away in 2006. He was a natural boatie. Albeit he did not grow up boating. His nick name from the Thames crew was Captain Rock Hopper. He would take her places most boaties would never go. It did come with its misfortunes. The family spent more than a few nights on the hard after Keith run aground going where he should not have. Especially in Mania Harbour.

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11-03-2017 Input from Mark McLaughlin
Below are a couple of more recent (10yrs ago!) photos of Hoani as she currently appears. She has been based in Havelock for over 10 years. She is beautifully maintained and is in regular use around the Marlborough Sounds and Nelson region.

Hoani at Havelock Jan 2006

Hoani Tennyson Inlet Jan 2006

 
HELP WANTED – GRACE
Woody, Paul Beachman was down at the Devonport Yacht Club yesterday morning post the big SE blow & spotted a lot of flotsam washed up, including timber & some boat gear. Late morning low tide indicated awash alongside a yellow mooring buoy a foundered launch that Paul fears maybe the launch Grace, that belonged to the late DYC member Ken Smith. A certain amount of material such as squabs, plastic objects was also seen ashore.

Paul understands that Grace was about 7m and had that pre 1914 look. Does anyone know more about Grace & whether she was anchored anywhere near DYC?

Hopefully not another centurion lost.