Restoration of Te Uira begins

FB_IMG_1539727408050

20181016_081930

 

FB_IMG_1539641729372

RESTORATION OF TE UIRA BEGINS 
 
Pleased to announce that the restoration of 45’ C & W Bailey built (1896) Te Uira has finally begun in Australia.
During the week I was contacted by Colin Grazules with the news – I’ll let Colin tell you the story.
 
“We have constructed a new wee shed to house the old girl and the steel and iron keel has been removed.
At this stage we are envisioning that the restoration back to her original condition should take 2 to 3 years all going well.
The owners wish is to return her to as close to her launch configuration as possible.

We will begin by removing the ribs that were added to stop her leaking in 1898.

But we need your help.

We need if possible a detailed plan of where the original stringers were installed and the triangular beam that sat on top of the floors?
A plan or photos of what the original keel would have looked like would be greatly appreciated.
I have a copy of Robert Brooke’s book ‘Beautiful Boats’ but unfortunately the plans in the book have little detail on this. 

A deck plan would also be of great assistance including including where the original mast step would have been installed etc.

Well this is just the start and I’m hoping this will become an ongoing conversation to ensure that we can do justice to Te Uira and her heritage!!

I intend to post the restoration on the NZ Classic Yacht Forum and on the Cygnet Wooden Boats FB page and will keep you appraised of the progress.”

 

Below are two videos of the keel removal.

Previous Input From Harold Kidd

TE UIRA (usually shortened in Oz to UIRA) was built by C.& W. Bailey and launched on 17th October 1896 for Gidgeon Palmer of Melbourne as a 5 rater.
She was taken across by the steamer TARAWERA with Chas. Bailey Jr going with her to settle her in.
She was quite successful in Melbourne but came up against SAYONARA, the bigger Fife-designed cutter.
She raced in Melbourne with the St. Kilda club for many years, converted to a Marconi rig in 1925.
 
You can also eat / see more here  https://wordpress.com/post/waitematawoodys.com/13298

Awa Iti

Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 10.26.22 AM

Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 10.26.40 AM

AWA ITI 

Awa Iti is a 26’ Gladden motor sailer that has been in one extended family for the past 40 years, but now it is time to pass on to someone who has the energy to keep this lovely old boat going. Her trademe listing says she’s a comfortable stable & safe boat that is easy to sail and handle. She draws under 3 ft and with her bilge keel she can sit on the mud flats upright. Its a classic Gladden which means for its length there is lots of room for a family to enjoy the inner gulf.  

This boat needs some TLC, but is currently sailable. Cabin top, varnish and hull painted and anti-foul done 2018.

 Powered with a “WaterMota Sea Wolf” petrol motor (based on Ford Escort motor) with a heat exchange unit Waterline length 7.1m 23.3ft – Beam widest point 2.775m 9.1ft  – Draft 863mm 2’10”. Currently moored at Northcote Point swing mooring. 

Currently the bidding sits at c$2000 & the reserve has been met so Awa Iti could be a very good buy for someone entering the classic woody movement 🙂

 

Rangi B16

B16

RANGI B16

I have recently been contacted by Andrew Mason who while going thru a collection of old photos, came across the one above by H Winkelmann, sporting the sail number B16. Andrew was asking if anyone knew if she was still around and if so, what became of her.

I was able to point Andrew in the direction of a comment by Harold Kidd from back in April 2015 where HDK commented on a story / photo ex Chris McMullen on a mystery ship (yacht) wreck.
HDK advised that B16 was the Bailey & Lowe keel yacht Rangi, which had broken up when she came ashore at Norfolk Island in 1951.
Anyone able to tell us more about Rangi prior to 1951?
Harold Kidd Input – She was built as the fishing boat or “schnapper boat” for line fishing by Bailey & Lowe in 1903 as SCHOPOLO for a Greek fisherman called Nicholas. She was very like if not a twin to the Bailey & Lowe fishing boat WHITE HEATHER built for J. Wheeler. Logan Bros’ VICTORY and FRANCES were the same sort of boats. Motor fishing launches made them uneconomical very shortly after and they were converted to most satisfactory yachts because of their extra beam.
SCHOPOLO was sold out of the fishing industry and became LORELEI in 1919, changed hands and was renamed RANGI around 1923.
She took part in the 1931, 1948 and 1951 TransTasman races but was lost at Norfolk Is on her return in 1951.
Input from Jim Lott – Rangi was owned for a number of years by Con Thode’s father. Con learned his early sailing on board and spoke often of his time on board, and his sadness when she was wrecked after his father sold her.

I have been away overseas on “Victoria” (another Auckland ‘woody’, since 2011 and am now back living in NZ.
Currently we won the Camelot “Mokoia” (Stewart) and also owned “Vectis” (Woolacott) in the 1970’s.

Waitoa F10

IMG_5976

WAITOA F10

 I have been sent the above photos of Waitoa F10, by Mike McGehan. Mike’s father, Mervyn is seen in the 1st photo on launch day 1947.
Previously on WW there has been debate as to a photo and details supplied by Ken Ricketts around his experience of the yacht (WW link below) as a result of Mike sending me the above photo and details, we can now safely assume that Ken has his wires crossed. https://waitematawoodys.com/2017/03/26/waitoa-sailing-sunday/
Previously on WW the McGahan family and Harold Kidd have commented on Waitoa’s provenance (link below)
Comparing the photos (below), I’m now happy to put this debate to bed 🙂

Make sure you log in to WW on tomorrow – great story / photos on the evolution of the 1912 Harvey & Lang launch – Silens

Building Fritha – Sailing Sunday

Fritha 4

Building Fritha –  Sailing Sunday

Following on from the stunning WW post on the McMullen & Wing built 74’ brigantine – Fritha, Chris McMullen has shared with us a gallery of photos from the build.
In Chris’s words – it shows a bunch of mainly young guys building a proper sailing ship. Chris commented how lucky they all were to have had that opportunity. The photos should be credited to M&W ex apprentice Grant Thomas who was the leading hand on Fritha.
 
The Fritha was built traditionally but certainly not by eye. You may notice the cabin trunks were well underway before the hull was planked. This was possible because M&W had a very experienced team. The workmanship got better every boat they built but the estimate of time was exceeded. (Chris stressed how lucky they were to have an understanding owner who appreciated what he got). Further, it became almost impossible to get good wood. Chris’s business partner Eric Wing was by then running their haul out yard at Westhaven.
Sadly “Fritha” was the last real boat M&W built. M&W was sold and became a ship yard rather than a boatyard.
While most people associate M&W as metal boat builders, Chris said that they did that, as we had to. There is nothing wrong with a wooden boat providing it is built properly of good timber. There was no wood left so it was metal or frozen snot. They chose to build metal boats but employed mainly woodworkers.
Chris would like to pass on thanks to the late owner of “Fritha” Mr JR Butland and the loyal team he had that built some beautiful yachts. 
 
View the previous WW story on Fritha here – lots of photos  https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/02/24/fritha/

Fritha 18

20th Lake Rotoiti – Antique & Classic Boat Show – 200+ Classic Wooden Boat Photos

P1050590

P1050583

IMG_0792

 

P1050618

 

P1050558

P1050566

P1050635

20th Lake Rotoiti – Antique & Classic Boat Show – 200+ Classic Wooden Boat Photos

On the 1st weekend of March we travelled south to Nelson for a wee escape. Just by chance (yeah right says the wife) there was a classic woody event on. I have seen and heard a lot about the Antique & Classic Boat Show that is held every year on Lake Rotoiti, one hour south of Nelson but I had never attended. We were staying with good friends in Mapua so early on the Sunday the men folk packed up the car  and headed off. We arrived at the lake as everyone was dusting off  / polishing their pride and joy – I understand there was a social event on the Saturday night and a few looked a little ‘dusty’ themselves.
The venue is just mind blowingly spectacular – and I have not seen so much varnished wood in one place in NZ before. Combine this with a very laid back southern friendliness and we had a great morning.
The woodys on show ranged from vintage radio controlled speedboats, sailing dinghies and speedboats to 100 mile-an-hour hydro-planes. Check out the movie of the hydro-plane Elray III below.
The photos above are intended to give you an insight into the show, warts and all – it’s not a gallery of perfectly presented craft.
Enjoy, we did.

Prudence

Screen Shot 2019-03-09 at 7.16.31 PM

Screen Shot 2019-03-09 at 7.16.54 PM

PRUDENCE
 
I have been contacted by Graham Paddon looking for information regarding Prudence – his 36’, 1965 Bob Swanson designed and built launch. Graham purchased her as an unfinished project about 3 years ago.
 
You will see in the photos above, ex the front cover of the November 1965 issue of the Mana Cruising Club newsletter – how Prudence looked when launched, the 2nd photo is the newsletter story on the boat. 
Graham knows very little of the boats history between her launching and when he bought her 3 years ago. If any woody can help Graham out it would be very much appreciated. The photos below show her today…….  I have to say she has lost the classic look. The newsletter photo and the fact she is triple-skinned kauri is just enough to sneak into WW 🙂
 
Classic Yacht Association Yachting 2019 Regatta
Last weekend saw the biggest fleet of classic yachts competing on the Waitemata in years – well done to the new CYA crew for pulling it all together. 
I was out of town but Roger Mills, aboard James Mortimer’s Logan – Little Jim, filmed and edited a very cool video from Day 2, Race 2. Check it out below – stunning footage of the old girls racing on our magnificent harbour – speaking of which – if you can, remember to join todays protest flotilla to stop the Auckland Council stealing more of our harbour – meet at 3pm off Queens Wharf – details here.