Matatua & Floss – Sailing Sunday

029

049

031

MATATUA

Picton boat builder Mike Coutts is doing a shout out to see if anyone would be interested in getting involved in the restoration of the 1938, Jim Lidgard built, 32’9″ yacht Matatua that he has taken over. Any help, advice or information would be welcome. I’ll let Mike tell the story.
Anyone able to help out – contact Mike via email at kootamac@gmail.com
 
“I have been given Matatua to restore , i can do anything given the time and money but both are in short supply here at present ! she has a lot of history in Wellington with Port Nick and has sailed to all corners of the Pacific several times that i know of. I served my time with John Lidgard and i have asked him and he said she was one of Jim Lidgard’s designs and built at Kauwau Island but he cant recall much more . Some one bolted a steel rudder and skeg , mounted a Coventry engine on steel engine beds, put an alloy mast on a steel mast step and extended the hull by about a meter . As you can imagine the dilignafication in some of these areas is quite severe, I told 2 previous owners that they had to get the steel out of her to no avail 25 years ago ! i have her on the hard at $150 a week and have got the steel rudder skeg off and working on the engine beds, mast out next and remove the steel mast step, chainplates etc . I would like to restore her but at this stage just trying to preserve whats left , which is surprisingly good, another testiment to Kiwi boat building and heart kauri” 
02-07-2020 Input from Robin Elliott and Harold Kidd

Harold and I have finally sorted the mystery of Matatua (well it was only a mystery to us, the rest of the world couldn’t care less 🙂 ).

Matatua was built as a 33-foot ketch by Roy Lidgard in 1938 at their yard in Freemans Bay Auckland for C.T. Jonas who originally named her Landfall.
NZ Herald 13/8/1938 has a photo of her on page 12 being built ‘for C.T. Jonas’.
Landfall was launched 19/11/1938 and described as an ‘auxilliary ketch’ 33ft overall, 26ft on the waterline with 9ft 6in beam. She carried 600 sq ft of sail and it was reported that her owner intended making a cruise to the islands at the end of the 1938-39 season.

From then on, no more mention of Landfall and it appears that C.T. Jonas and his co-owner Harry Gillard, renamed her Matatua quite soon after launching.

The ketch Matatua first appears in print in February 1939 racing with other boats in the Lidgard employees picnic from the Freemans Bay slipway to Motuihe. She raced regularly with RNZYS and RAYC for the rest of the season. Her registration number was B-9.

The ketch rig clearly wasn’t a success because in September 1939 the NZH 26/9/39 reports ‘aux yacht Landfall owned by C.T. Jonas which made an appearance last year under ketch rig has been converted into a cutter’. This reference to Landfall is odd because she had been named Matatua since at least the beginning of 1939, but maybe they were just making the connection back their earlier articles.

In the winter of 1940, yet more improvements.
NZH 2/7/40: B-class yacht Matatua owned by C. Jonas has had 2ft 6in added to her counter by Lidgard Bros. OA length now 35ft 6in and will enable carrying a permanent backstay,
NZH 9/12/40: Photo of Matatua with her new cutter rig, B-9 on the sail.

The war intervenes and Matatua ceases racing.

During this time the Auckland yacht registration records, probably having been moved about or in storage during the war, had fallen into disarray. By the time a new list is published in July 1946, Matatua has been registered twice, first by Harry Gillard, who retained B-9, and again by C.T. Jonas who got a new number B-24. The error was picked up and B-24 lapsed but it remained in the official lists for a couple of seasons until another purge of obsolete registrations in 1948.

Clarrie Irvine raced Matatua, as B-9, for the next couple of seasons and sold her in 1949 to R. Campbell of Wellington. The trip to Wellington under delivery skipper Terry Hammond was hard and they were missing for several days after hitting a nor’westerly gale just off Cape Palliser that blew them as far south as Kaikoura. After getting back to almost the same spot, they ran into a westerly gale that blew them back out to sea. Eventually Matatua got to Wellington, her crew had been battered for 84 hours.

Matatua remained in Wellington (registered as Wellington A-10) for the next 12 years or so. She was purchased by K. Stutter in 1957, and in 1962 was sold to D. Fletcher of Epsom who brought her back to Auckland where she picked up her old number of B-9. Fletcher didn’t appear to do any racing but in 1968 he sold her to George Retter of the Richmond Yacht Club who owned and raced her until 1981.

Matatua has had no registered owners since then. Her NZYF number is 109

One major confusion with Matatua has been the Bob Stewart design Mata-a-tua built for George Gresham of Tauranga in 1947. When Matatua was sold to Wellington, her B-9 registration became vacant and was issued to Gresham’s Mata-a-tua thus beginning a series of tortured confusions in boating magazines and newspapers between the two boats.

This was continued when Mata-a-tua was also sold to Wellington in 1958 where she became Wellington A-9. Her owner Brian Millar brought her to Auckland in 1964 and she entered the 1965 Anniversary Regatta under her Wellington number A-9. (A-9?.. A-9??.. That’s Moana and We can’t have that!!) In February she was re-registered as B-47.

Another tedious ‘golly gee’ point. Both Clarrie Irvine and George Retter owned the Bailey built C-class Matua C-54. Both of them sold Matua to buy Matatua

I have been told to ‘get a life’ by many people.

 

FLOSS – 4sale
Recently Baden Pascoe sent me details on Floss – the sailing dinghy below. Baden’s father Howard, built the glued ply dinghy which is now for sale. Owner Jock Speedy is only the second owner. I understand Jock is open to reasonable offers. Contact via email at jmspeedy55@gmail.com
IMG-0924

Mana

IMG_20200117_112547221_HDR

MANA

Back in late February, David Cooke sent me the above photos which were sent to him by Ken McGill.
I’m not sure of the location, possibly Mana ?
Can anyone ID the yacht?
Input from Jason Prew – It’s the Col Wild built and designed Mana with the (in)famous Sam McGill looking after this haul out.
And at the other end of the scale – some eye candy below – the 1934, 30-Square Metre, 43’ yacht – Tre Sang, seen here leaving the Robbe & Berking, Flensburg Germany, shipyard.
Screen Shot 2020-06-14 at 5.18.38 PM

Herne Bay Yacht Club + Primadonna Update

Screen Shot 2019-09-09 at 11.07.03 AM

HERNE BAY YACHT CLUB

I love the above photo c.1930 of the Herne Bay Yacht Club, a lot of classes on show.
These days there is a better chance of seeing a helicopter taking off from that spot 🙂
15-06-2020 Input below from Robin Elliott

The photo of the boats from the Herne Bay JUNIOR Yacht Club (as it was known then) was taken probably 1933 not long after it was formed for boys under 18 and the location is the foot of George Dennes’s slipway at Sarsfield St, Herne bay.
George Dennes was the commodore and the only adult in the club. All other positions were held by the boys, who ran all the meetings. Vice Commodore Geoff Hodgson was 9, Rear Commodore Jim Faire, aged 13, Hon Sec Colin Dennes ages 16.

At first the boats were a mixed bag of local sailing dinks, the odd Zeddie, ‘anything with a sail’ and as you can see there in sail number 10, what looks to be a Zeddie with a bowsprit and jib.
In the winter of 1934, George Tyler built the 12-foot Silver Fern to an Arch Logan design for Colin Dennes. Others followed and the club consolidated around the new Silver Fern Class.

The administration experience gained from running their own affairs was put to good effect when many of the members, once they reached 18 years joined Richmond Yacht Club. By 1939, the RYC Commodore was Rupert Thorpe, Vice Comm Jim Frankham; Rear Comm Colin Dennes. All three HBJYC graduates and all under 21.

George Dennes died in 1942 and the Commodore’s role was taken over by Alf Thompson (Chad’s father) and continued until the Silver Fern’s demise around 1952, swept way by the new fangled Cherub, Moths and Pennant classes.

Notable yachtsmen, in no particular order, who came through the Silver Ferns were Laurie Davidson, John Lasher, Jim Faire, Des and Ray Hurley, Roy and Frank Dickson, Alan Barclay, Brian Woods, Des Townson, Murray White, Neville Thom, Shirley & Roy White, John Taylor, Roly Moreland, John Peet ….. and on and on…..

It was a very important club in its time and its unique structure actually trained young yacht club administrators. No other club did that.

 

PRIMADONNA – Comes North
These days most woodys that you see on the back of Boat Haulage’s rig are heading south, so its great to see one arriving in Auckland. The 1910 ex whale chaser – Primadonna, arrived Friday afternoon at Pier 21.
A few days of TLC from new owner James Hutchinson and then she will be back in the water. Hopefully another candidate for the Anniversary Day Tug/Work Boat race on the harbour 🙂
She came with a lot of documentation from pervious owners, so when I sight that, hopefully we can establish / confirm her provenance.
Read / view more at this previous WW story https://waitematawoodys.com/2017/04/19/primadonna/
16-06-2020 Input from Peter Beech (petethedeep)

“We had the pleasure of care taking the old Primadonna for a number of years over 40 yrs ago, we did a lot of cruising and have many wonderful memories of her.
 She was powered by a 3 cyl water cooled Lister about 30 hp, being long and skinny with a beautiful counter stern , she ran like a skinny hogget, was good for 9 kts and was miserable on fuel. (less than a Gallon per hr.)
I’d like to comment on the issue of “hearsay history”, I remember researching the whakapapa of the Primadonna by talking to the descendants of original owner, Alf Baldick who farmed in Onapua Bay in Tory Channel.
His nephew Ian Baldick told me that his uncle had her built in 1913 by Ernie Lane.
During the Great War they whaled out of Te awai iti, I have an old photo of her along side a beached whale in Tar White. 
From memory there were 4 Baldick brothers, Alf, Herman and Darcy (twins) both stood 6 ft 4″ in their stocking feet ! and Billy Baldick who farmed on Blumine Island,( another sister Ida lived with him, ) Billy was reputed to have built 200 clinker dinghys on the island, selling them to Sounds farmers.
One of their sisters married a Guard, a descendant of Jackie Guard, ( the famous whaler) and another married a Jackson, of the Jackson Bay whaling dynasty, so whaling was very much in their blood.
I was talking to Hermans daughter Grace one day about the Baldick boats, she said –
“The old people are dead and gone but their boats live on”
She also said that their lives revolved around their boats, they were their daily transport, their farm boats, their fishing boats, they built many of them themselves and repaired and modified them.
She said that once a year they would all gather at Maraetai Bay, line their boats up and have a regatta! Alf had the Primmadonna, Herman and Darcey had the Greyhound and the Daphnee,  Billy had the Waiata .
I dont know what become of the Daphnee, the Greyhound  with her beautiful clipper bow and counter stern eventually rotted away, the Dreadnaught was built by Herman and Darcey for their sister Emma Guard, very similar to the Greyhound but Emma wanted more beam and draft for stability so they could carry farm produce over Cook Strait to the Wellington markets.
Last time I saw her she was in Wellington, not sure where she is now. Gracey told me that when they were planking her, towards the end they ran out of copper rooves so used Halfpennies. 
I have Billies old Waiata  at home here in the shed, she would be one of the oldest boats in the Sounds, built by Ernest Berg around 1900′ ish..  she is a pretty, double diagonal, straight stemmed, with a lovely counter stern, she originally had a Glouster stern, or cut off counter, Billy took her to Ernie Lane and said “put a descent counter on her.” (she is a real classic and for sale to the right buyer, who wants a restoration project.
Local people in my fathers generation used to tell stories, like folk legends about The Guards and the Baldicks, they were probably illiterate, they spoke with a real south of England Cornish drawl that was so distinctive, they lived a very isolated but fascinating  lifestyle.
So these are local oral histories, they are not researched to see if we have got our facts straight, the old lady was right, the old people are dead and gone and now their boats are well over 100 yrs old and wooden boats no matter what their condition are all restorable.
Unfortunately the old people never wrote down their stories and when boats outlive living memories they become fairy tales.
30 yrs ago I went around alot of the old timers and wrote down alot of their memories about the old Sounds launches and collected a lot of old photos, I’m pleased that I did that because all those old boys are dead and gone now.
Waitamata Woodys is doing just that in digital formate which is wonderful and should be encouraged because it ensures that the stories and the spirits of our old people in these wonderful craft live on”
Primadonna heads north
IMG_5906

IMG_5917

WCW Riverhead June2020

RSVP waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Tall Ships Regatta – Bay of Islands 2013/14

DW-140104_DSC5828

Ranui

DW-130105_DHW7886

Undine

ts-2013-2

Colonist

DW-140104_DSC5970

TALL SHIPS REGATTA – Bay of Islands 2013/14

 
Today’s photos come to us from professional photographer Dean Wright’s sailing archives and show a selection of woodys partaking in the annual BOI event.
Nice to see Ranui with all the washing on the line 🙂 , these days she tends to motor sail around the Hauraki Gulf.
 
There are not a lot of yachts these days that look even better out of the water – one such beauty is hauled out at Pier 21 in Auckland at the moment – Waitangi , designed and built in 1894 by Robert Logan Snr. Like most of these old girls, a killer for marina fees i.e. 36’ waterline but 58’ on deck – with a 74’ sailing carrying length. Photos below ex Larry Paul
Screen Shot 2020-06-05 at 8.16.28 PM

Screen Shot 2020-06-05 at 8.16.01 PM

Screen Shot 2020-06-05 at 8.16.15 PM

Clarionet – Sailing Sunday

_DHW4353

_DHW4360

Clarionet – Sailing Sunday

Today’s woody is the Chappelle designed schooner- Clarionet, seen here early one morning in Whangamumu, Northland getting ready to get underway.

The photo was taken in 2011 by Dan Wright.
I understand these days she calls Mahurangi home.
Update– more photos & details at this link
WoodenBoat Magazine Live Chat
Click the link below to join WB editor Matt Murphy in a live discussion with Reuben Smith. Reuben is boatbuilder and owner of Tumblehome Boatshop in the Southern Adirondacks town of Warrensburg, New York. The shop has restored some of the finest canoes, skiffs, guideboats, runabouts, launches, and one-design sailboats in the region. The conversation includes a ‘ walk-about’ of some of the shop’s past and present projects.

Herald – Sailing Sunday

Herald h

Herald n

HERALD – Sailing Sunday
Recently I was sent the  above gallery of photos of the small yacht – Herald, from kiwi Fred Lomas, who lives/works in Australia. The photos are from an album given to him by his ex (deceased) Omapere (near Opononi, Northland) neighbour – Aubrey Bracey.  Aubrey was a farmer / carpenter who built a couple of small boats, Herald being one of them.
How lucky were these kids to have a boat of their own at their age, these days we are just too PC.
I love the combination of paint colours – a perfect example of the old principle of only using 3 colours max on a boat. Also looks like as the kids got taller, they raised the cabin top 🙂
Devonport Yacht Club – Duder Cup – On The World Stage
Check out the link below to read / view a great story by Rob Peake, editor of the ‘Classic Boat’ magazine in the UK, on this years running of the Duder Cup race.

Maureen II + Off Center Harbor Wet Sunday Treat

Repaint_Completed Jan 2013

MAUREEN II
 

One of the many woodys that contacted WW for a copy of Chris McMullen’s docking tips was Mike Empson, owner of – Maureen II, a Matangi, built c1967-68 by Brin Wilson. Maureen II is 100% kauri, 36′ long and weighs approx. 9 tonnes.

Mike has been in touch with people connected to the Brin Wilson yard and been told she may have been built for someone connected to Ross Reid Contractors – that woodys is all Mike and wife Ann know about her, so would love to uncover more information on the vessel.

 
Mike has commented that he believes these boats were originally built with timber masts and timber lifeline stanchions, but Maureen II has had retro-fitted aluminium mast & boom, plus stainless lifeline stanchions. It has roller-boom reefing and a roller furling headsail.
 
Power is via a Ford 4-cyl E592 industrial stationary engine, marinised when new, by Lees Marine, fresh-water cooled. These engines were also used on the UK 4-cyl Ford Trader trucks, in the mid to late 1950’s and also on Fordson Major tractors.
Transmission is through a Parsons Marine-o-matic HG4 Mk 2 hydraulic transmission and she has a 1.75” bronze prop-shaft which is 11’6″ long. She is set up with dual station steering, which comprises a truck steering box with a long under-floor shaft, connected by chains to the two steering stations; one inside and the other in the cockpit.
WOODY WET SUNDAY TREAT 
 

As you know I’m a big fan of the website – Off Center Harbor, the site is probably best known for jaw dropping boat tours and in-depth how-to series, but the OCH lads also know how to slow down and soak up the scenery. Given the craziness of the last 5 weeks I have found myself trolling the OCH online library more than ever, looking to a cure to my boat less blues. I have some favourites that I would be embarrassed to say how many times I have viewed 🙂

Last week one that popped up again was the OCH lads doing an early morning mooch around the fleet at anchor at last summers Eggemoggin Reach Regatta in Maine. The stunning classic woodys are basking in a golden glow at dawn after the previous days racing and partying. It reminds me very much of Saturday morning at our own Mahurangi Reggata.
Chatting with Steve Stone from OCH, I mentioned the comparison as Steve was at the Mahurangi Regatta in 2019 and Steve kindly offered to supply a link to the ERR video – view it here  CLICK HERE 
 
Screen Shot 2020-05-03 at 6.42.50 AM
Early in the lock-down the OCH guys put together a special deal for waitemata woodys to help us out while we are boat less. Well the good news it is still on offer – so if you haven’t already joined up, do it today – link here 8-week membership with full access to the entire website for just $5 NZD. They’re also including an optional upgrade to an annual membership at the end of the 8 weeks at 50% off.
Woodys, signing up to OCH will be the 2nd best woody thing you have done – after discovering WW 🙂

Ngahere L34

Ngahere 5022

Ngahere 4021

Ngahere 2019

NGAHERE
 
The mullet boat Ngahere was built in 1938 by the Graham Bros. of Otahuhu. Baden Pascoe believes that she may possibly been named Zamira (L 34) when built or renamed. She was owned by Billy Matthews for many years. Baden’s father, Howard, bought her in a rundown state in the 1980’s and replaced several ribs and had her in very tidy condition. Her mast was cut down to its original length and Frank Warnock supplied new sails. Howard sailed her to Auckland for several Lipton Cups and AAR events.
Baden commented that Howard loved racing centre board boats and while Ngahere was never a champion boat, under Howard’s command she performed well at all of these events.
 
In the top photo we see – Howard Pascoe, Baden Pascoe, Owen Bray, Keven Pascoe, Puka (Les) Pascoe.
 
Any of the rag and stick woodys able to tell us more about Ngahere?
Update 1 ex Simon Smith – photo below of Ngahere (today 19-04-2020) at The Slipway, Milford.
IMG_5387
Update 2 – Photos below sent in by Jason Prew (The Slipway) and owner, Chris Harris
Update 3 – Harold Kidd Input – NGAHERE was built by J Graham at Otahuhu for his son Scott Graham in late 1939 as ZAMIRA the Russian for “peace”. Because of the war, she didn’t do much racing. Her first race appears to have been at the Tamaki Yacht Club on 13th December 1940 followed by the Lipton Cup representing the Otahuhu Sailing Club on 25th January 1941 (3rd) then the Anniversary Regatta when she was on scratch. It looks like Billy Matthews changed her name to NGAHERE around 1945.
21-04-2020 Input es Janet Watkins –With the 100th race for the Lipton Cup coming up I have been compiling a dossier on all the L Class and every Lipton Cup Race sailed over the century from old Club records, newspaper reports, magazines and sailors but there are still gaps.
Of Zamira / Ngahere I have this information. Zamira was built by Graham Bros Otahuhu and launched in 1938. She raced for the Lipton Cup in 1941-fin 3rd and in Jan 1946. Her name was changed in late 1946 to Ngahere and she raced as Ngahere for the Lipton Cup in Dec 1946, ’53,’54,’58,’61,’62,’63. (There were 2 Lipton Cup races in 1946 being of 2 seasons but none in 1947) She was still reg. with PCC 1966 & ’72. In the 1970’s she was reported to be at Coromandel. From WW I now know she was bought by Howard Pascoe in rundown state 1980’s, new ribs and rig fitted. Howard sailed her to AK for Lipton Cup race/s. I have yet to locate all the entry and race details for the 1970’s & 80’s – can anyone help?Now looking spruce in Milford Marina and owned by Chris Harris. (Thank you WW) Will she be joining us for the big Lipton Cup Centennial, hopefully, in March 2021? Unfortunately, the Lockdown stopped the sailing of the 99th Lipton Cup which the Ponsonby Cruising Club is waiting to reschedule!!Who was the original owner? When did Billy Matthews own her? Who were the owners and skippers during the Lipton Cup races?

21-04-2020 Harold Kidd Update – The 1938 date is a canard gleaned from “Mullet Boats ‘n Quotes” at page 46. Newspaper reports of the time say she was under construction by J. Graham of Otahuhu for his son Scott Graham in September 1939. Scott Graham was her original owner and raced her until the 1941 Lipton Cup when she was described as “new” and then in the Anniversary Regatta a week or so later.
Billy Matthews was shown as owner in the APYMBA records for 1946.
Graham Cole of Karaka Bay and L Good owned her in 1946. They sold to Ross Weaver of Whangarei c1948.S Hammond of Regina St Grey Lynn owned her in 1952. S Daniels of Webber St Grey Lynn in 1953. M Aitken of Mt Roskill in 1973. Ray Esdale Northcote c1980 followed by Howard Pascoe of course.

22-04-2020 – Robin Elliott Input – Ah … Mullet Boats N Quotes. Duck soup.

I don’t think she actually went into the water until some time in 1940, hence the ‘new’ tag in the 1941 Lipton Cup Report. I have an unconfirmed note that J. Graham and S. Graham were respectively the father and brother of Mark Graham the Kiwi rugby League Player – but he was not born until 1955, so I am not sure.

Regatta Programmes:
Billy Matthews entered her as Zamira in the 1946 Anniversary regatta, she came 6th across the line from 12 starters. He entered her as Ngahere in the 1947 Regatta so the name change was ‘possibly’ from the start of the 1946/47 season although he could have changed the name the day before the placed his regatta entry in January 1947. 🙂
Messrs Cole & Good enter her in the 1948 and 1949 Regattas, R. Weaver in the 1950 Regatta.

No regatta mentions until S. Hammond enters her in the 1953 and 1954 AAR
Nothing until 1961 AAR when entered by ‘Naylor, and then 1962, 1963 by N.E. ‘Taylor’

Other Registered owners were : K.W. Skinner, Wharf Rd, Herne Bay 1955+?; R.E.(N.E.?) Naylor, Hauraki St, Birkenhead 1960?/63+?; Munro 1966+?; M. O’Brien, Cameron St Ponsonby 1966+?; M.C. Chitty, East Coast Rd Browns Bay. 1968+?; H.L. Whitcombe, Onewa Rd Northcote 1970+?; M. Aitken, Tory St, Mt Roskill 1973+?

After that, darkness descends as the Auckland Yachting Assn stopped publishing their year books (or rather no one has given me anything after 1973.)

Arch Logan Dinghy – Silver Fern 

Screen Shot 2020-04-11 at 5.31.17 PM

Arch Logan Sailing Dinghy – Silver Fern 
 

Chatting with Tinopai (2hrs north of Auckland) based woody Greg Schultz he tells me advancing old age has forced him to make the reluctant decision to pass on one of my most prized possessions.
Greg built this boat about 10 yrs ago off the original 1905 Arch Logan plans (modified by Chapman1921). Construction is clinker lapstrake using 6mm ply with epoxy glued laps which gives a good lightweight watertight hull (originals leaked like sieves and weighed a ton). All other timbers are kauri and totara. He also added 3 buoyancy compartments for added safety (2 side seats & forward compartment all epoxy sealed inside). Greg commented that she has only been sailed approx. a dozen times.

The Silver Fern class (12’6″) was designed as a training boat for teenagers before they moved on to the bigger M class and is therefore almost a miniature ‘Emmie’.
Spars and rigging are s/s and sails by Fife. Pivoting centerboard and rudder for shallow water sailing. Permanent reef lines for shortening sail without coming ashore.

Woodys this is a stunning boat to both look at and sail so if you are frustrated with paying big marina fees and the hassles of organizing crew – maybe now is the time to add a woody to the fleet so that you can sail single handed or take the grand kids for a sail.

Given the lockdown if you are interested it might be best to contact Greg direct at itzgreg@yahoo.com
UPDATE – Read comments section for feedback on the boats provenance.

IDA – All Dressed Up & No Where To Go

IMG_5039

IMG_5028

IDA – All Dressed Up & No Where To Go
Last night this 125 year old A-Class classic yacht was going to be the leading lady at the RNZYS for a party to celebrate her relaunch – but CV-19 put a stop to that 😦
So woodys today you get a peek at her tucked away in Wayne Olsen’s shed waiting for the green light to step out.
It seems unbelievable  that it was only July 2019 that I Iast visited the yard and now she is all set to splash (see link below for photos + details on her history and how she came home after ‘migrating’ to the Big Island.
Ida was designed by Charles Bailey Jnr and built / launched in 1895 by C&W Bailey gaff rigger
She is 58’ LOA, with a beam of 8’ – LOW = 45’ so there is a lot of bits hanging off her when she is in racing mode
Once again the classic yachting movement is indebted to John Street and his Classic Yacht Charitable Trust, they restore and maintain the cream of New Zealand’s A-Class fleet, and race the pants off every other woody in the fleet. Well done.
WBB0003_Banner-980x160

Classico – Launch Day

classico (3)

classico (2)

CLASSICO

A few weeks ago I was tipped off by Adrian Pawson that one of his buddies – James Ledingham, had ‘acquired’ a very special Frostbite named Classico, one of things that makes her special is that she was built but never launched, so effectively is a new boat. Adrian is the owner of – Kiteroa, the ex Brooke family boat, which Adrian has restored and ’tweaked’ a little, thats her in the photos with the orange hull.

I was onto James quick smart to get more details. But before that I have to say how cool it is to see these ‘young’ sailors getting into the classic wooden dinghy sailing scene. The guys sail out of Taikata Sailing Club in West Auckland (Te Atatu), on a good Sunday there are upwards of 15 Frostbites racing. Both Adrian and James would be too modest to say this – but both work at the very pointy (high tech) end of world sailing, which makes their passion for these woodys even more special 🙂

Adrian also supplied for our review (see below) a copy of Doug Sharp’s secret copy of the ‘Frostbite Go Fast Tips’ by Kevin Lidgard.

I’ll let James tell the story –

“Recently I was fortunate enough to purchase ‘Classico’ a wooden frostbite dinghy.

What made this boat unique, aside from her immaculate timber detailing, was that she was brand new and had never been sailed. Something of a rarity in the frostbite class these days.

‘Classico’ is the result of a labour of love by her builder and previous owner David Strickett (Brother in law of Rex Maddren – a well-known Frostbite sailor and champion in his day). Looking for a wooden boat project and with a love of the clinker style, the Frostbite dinghy was a natural choice for David to get stuck into. Having picked up his wooden boat building skills at Carrington Tech under the guidance of Robert Brooke (son of Jack Brooke, who designed the original frostbite back in 1937) he was certainly well equipped to tackle such a build. Robert helped him source some temporary frames from Wakatere Boating Club and he got stuck in.

The boat is built in kauri, the majority of which was sourced from a farmer in Mangamuka, just south of Kaitia. The exception was the single piece transom, which came from a kauri slab that David already had in his garage.

Many hands make light work and during the build David sought help with the planking and ribbing from Robin Dew, who had built several wooden Frostbites himself. Whangarei boat builder Nick Rodokal also lent a hand in constructing the gunwhale, having previously built David a Lotus 9.2 (Pursuit).

David kitted the boat out with modern aluminum spars, a Quantum Mylar sail, and the latest Harken deck gear. Adding a touch of performance to the classic kauri hull.   

It was a bittersweet moment to launch ‘Classico’ down at Taikata Sailing Club on the first Sunday of March 2020, ahead of the regular afternoon sailing. She would have been equally at home in a museum (or the lounge!) and once wet and raced, unlikely to ever be quite be as immaculate again. However, they are such great boats to sail I was looking forward to getting out and seeing what she could do. She was appropriately blessed by another frostbite legend, Doug Sharp, and champagne was poured. A successful first sail ensued with minimal leaking.

While the quality of the boat couldn’t be faulted her performance was an unknown. However, she certainly seems to be fast (when the skipper sends her in the right direction) so far grabbing a 2nd in the first race of the Taikata Sailing Club winter series held earlier in March.

I plan to race her regularly down at Taikata Sailing Club, where the Frostbite fleet is thriving – with 12+ boats on the start line every fortnight. Wooden boat enthusiasts are welcome to come down to the club and have a yarn. There are a good number of well-kept and restored timber Frostbites amongst the fleet, and no shortage of stories! 

The name ‘Classico’ stems from a holiday dinner in Tuscany where David and his wife were enjoying a bottle of traditional Chanti wine – Chianti ‘Classico’.”

Frostbite Go Fast Tips 1

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

Ngarurua + CYA Regatta Sailing Photos

Screen Shot 2020-03-07 at 10.53.59 PM

Screen Shot 2020-03-07 at 10.53.18 PM

NGARURUA

The 37’ Ngaruroa was built by Nobby Clark, a commercial boat builder and launched in 1965. Built from carvel plank, heart kauri. Powered by a 120hp 6 cylinder Perkins diesel engine. 
Over the last 8 years she has been under gone an extensive re-fit and her owner now finds themselves just too busy to complete the project – so if there is a woody out there handy with their hands – Ngarurua just needs her interior finished and a lick of paint. She is fully operational in its present state. Thanks to Ian McDonald for the tme heads up.

CYA CLASSIC YACHT REGATTA UPDATE – DAY TWO (Races 2&3)
Yesterday morning I was dock side at Race HQ co-ordinating a meet up between renowned wooden boat photographer Benjamin Mendlowitz and James Dreyer (MV Laughing Lady) and I got ‘press ganged’ into accompanying them on LL for the day. Was not what I had planned but sometimes you just go with the flow.
Had an amazing day and got some great sailing photos. A taste below – full story on Monday.
IMG_4469

A10 – Thelma / A7 – Rainbow

IMG_4471

A7 – Thelma / A2 – Rawhiti

IMG_4447

A16 – Little Jim

Waiwhetu – Sailing Sunday

IMG_1188

IMG_7476

WAIWHETU – Sailing Sunday

The 30’ keeler – Waiwhetu, was built in 1965 by Des Townson and his father in Des’s Morrin Road factory for Tulloch Kebbell. She was launched 31st January 1966.
Tulloch Kebbell owned her for 48 years, selling her to the current owner Blu Steven in Feb 2014.
Blu commented that these days she has a Drofin 12hp diesel twin engine (that replaced the original Ford petrol unit) and he has added several of mod cons such as a VHF radio, GPS unit, twin battery setup, new water tanks, wiring, engine mounts, stern gland, and a fire extinguisher, but Blu has deliberately kept it as close as practicable to how it was in the 1960’s. That means hanked-on head sails, below deck anchor storage (no windlass or even a bow-roller), and an ancient gas stove (that replaced the original Primus).
 
Waiwhetu is a darling to sail, and has a very good motion and can be balanced to provide a neutral helm that will track in a straight line while conditions are stable.

Refer below the original copy of the – specification of materials, work and payments – if to hard to read – below is a link to a viewable PDF file.
Screen Shot 2020-02-15 at 5.09.33 PM
Screen Shot 2020-02-15 at 5.09.53 PM

Tall Ship Peking Rounds Cape Horn – Movie

Tall Ship Peking Rounds Cape Horn – Movie

The above 1929 film is shot and narrated by Captain Irving Johnson and records the tall ship Peking on her outward bound journey around Cape Horn.
Special thanks to Max Pike for sending me the link.
Input from Keith Ottaway

“She is still afloat and being restored……..

http://ss-peking.de/en/viermastbark-peking/bildergalerie.php

There is another of these in Sweden / Finland

https://sjofartsmuseum.ax/en/the-ship-pommern/

And a read of Eric Newby book on sailing these with a complete set of photos.

https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/298571.Learning_the_Ropes

The book has some very good photos under way and what they had to do – very readable – but on a winters night in front of the fire to make you appreciate what you have.”

 

Ghost

image003

image002

image001

GHOST –  Sailing Sunday
Today’s story is the result of a hunt for a long lost launch photo and I came across a file tagged ‘Ghost’. The above photos were sent to me by Peter Robinson back in late 2016 and somehow the file slipped between the cracks.
Peter wrote asking for help locating information on the history of Ghost.
Given the 3 year incubation period , it would be nice to think that we could help Peter out 😉

13-01-2020 

Harold Kidd Input – Designed and built by Bert Woollacott in late 1938  for himself. Later owned by Ken Brown who did the 1948, 1951 and 1952 TransTasman races in her. Based on Bert’s Vectis design. I thought she had gone offshore?
Murray Deeble Input – Harold is right, the Ghost went offshore and was wrecked–the vessel pictured is Kehua wrongly advertised as the original Ghost in the 80’s and 90,s  Kehua has an unusual past herself featuring in one of the first Suva races -(washing ashore near Whakatane eventually.)
And more from HDK – KEHUA = GHOST in Maori. Built by Selwyn Matheson and Peter Ashcroft in Whangarei (?). Bert didn’t like the changes to his design.

ASTROLABE – A Peek Down Below

IMG_3153

IMG_3130

IMG_3129

IMG_3156

ASTROLABE – A Peek Down Below

I had the pleasure recently to inspect Astrolabe, the 51’ 7” Bruce Clark designed, John Salthouse built 1974 sloop. As you would expect from any craft from John Salthouse’s hands, she is a work of art – 1 3/8” kauri, splned and glassed. She has had a serious amount of blue water under her keel and has enjoyed 27 years of continuous ownership.
Sadly her owner has reached a stage in life where he would like the yacht to have a new caretaker – not just anyone, you would have to be a passionate woody to be in the running for stewardship of Astrolabe.
I post todays story to give you something to think about over the Christmas break. The boat was not ‘dressed’ for photos, these are  just ‘snaps’ from my iPhone.
If you are a serious woody looking for a classic cruising yacht that ticks all the boxes – looks, designer and builder creds, blue water capable and maintained for the last 27 years to an extraordinary standard – in the first instance,  contact us at the email below. waitematawoodys@gmail.com
WBB0003_Banner-980x160

Dolphyn – Sailing Sunday

boat

Out of water

DOLPHYN – Sailing Sunday

During the week I was contacted by Joe Pallante who along with his partner has just purchased the 34’Don Brooke designed yacht Dolphyn. Other than the length, possible build date of c.1970 and designer Joe knows very little about the yacht. Via the comments section on WW Robert Brooke has kindly ‘pointed’ Joe in the direction of brother Don.
The yacht was purchased off a Canadian gent and is moored in Shoal Bay, Auckland.
Can anyone help Joe out with some history on the vessel?
LADY ELLEN – Re-Launching
Have spent the weekend in Russell for the re-launch of Bruce Mitchinson’s 1950’s Supreme Craft – Lady Ellen – check out tomorrows WW story to view the action. Stunning weekend in the bay.
Screen Shot 2019-12-11 at 6.53.39 AM

OLEO + K1 + K CLASS BOOK LAUNCH

 

OLEO
OLEO
Now the above photo has been sitting in my files for a little while and with all the varnish boys waking up at anchor in Patio Bay, with a dull head, post the CYA party, today could be a good day to get some help from the Work Boat woodys.
The photo of Oleo was sent in by Ray Morey, ex Dave Stanaway, showing her on the hard at Awanui earlier this year – can we learn more about her?
Harold Kidd Input – OLEO was built for R H Harnett of Whangarei by Tyler & Harvey in December 1910. Her original engine was a 20hp Union.
R H Harnett lived at Parua Bay and was a trader on the harbour. He sold OLEO to R B S Hogwood in 1915 and owned MOERANGI for passenger and mail work from 1912 until he died in 1936.

IMG_5971

K1

The photo above came to me as part of a selection of sailing photos, sent in by Mike McGehan. Nothing spectacular about the photo but its a good segue to remind you all to put a circle in the diary for Monday 9th December for the launch of Jenni Mence’s book named, no prizes here, K-Class.
Invitation below – but please if you are attending, to help with catering – RSVP to Jenni at jenni@kclass.co.nz
Screen Shot 2019-11-28 at 6.09.45 PM

Tall Ship Peking – Tackles Cape Horn

Tall Ship Peking – Tackles Cape Horn
The movie below was shot and narrated by Captain Irving Johnson in 1929 and features the tall ship Peking on her outbound journey around Cape Horn. – Its 1/2 hr long but a good insight into when men were men 🙂
Screen Shot 2019-11-21 at 6.55.06 AM
For lovers of wooden boats – the 2020 Calendar of Wooden Boats, published by Ben Mendlowitz and Maynard Bray has just hit the shops. You can buy it on-line at the WoodenBoat Store – link below. Nice to see that our own Waitangi has mage an appearance – gracing the month of December.
Screen Shot 2019-11-21 at 6.54.46 AM

Clarionet – Sailing Sunday

20190429_123430

CLARIONET – Sailing Sunday

Woody Alan Sexton sent in the above photos of the yacht Clarionet hauled out back in April at the Sandspit Yacht Club.
Interesting design, Alan suspects from the East Coast, USA.
I know one should never assume anything but we both assume her shallow draft accommodates a centreboard, also assume she sports a bowsprit.
Can anyone tell us more about Clarionet?
Hopefully with good luck as you read this, I’ll be moored a long way up the Wairoa River at Clevedon waiting for the tide to come in so we can make the trip backdown the river. Lots of photos from the Woody Classics Weekend overnight BBQ cruise to the Clevedon Cruising Club on Monday.
And A Wee Bonus Today – some wonderful sailing footage of the then just relaunched – Kelpie of Falmouth

CAPTAIN COOK’S TALL SHIP -ENDEAVOUR + WAKA – 35 Photos 

20191106-_DHW7394

20191107-_DHW7449

CAPTAIN COOK’S TALL SHIP – ENDEAVOUR + WAKA – 35 Photos 
 
As promised on Friday today we share with you a stunning photo gallery from the camera of professional photographer, Dean Wright. On Wednesday and Thursday of this week, Dean was out on the water taking photos of Tuia 250, the commemoration of 250 years since the first onshore meetings between Maori and Europeans in 1769-70. Tuia 250 also celebrates the voyaging heritage of the Pacific people that led to the settlement of New Zealand many generations before. The Tuia 250 flotilla is made up of two waka from NZ, and three tall ships including the Endeavour replica from Australia, and a va’a tipaerua from Tahiti that are all sailing the coast of NZ to engage with communities and iwi for three months from October to December.
 
Dean commented that the flotilla was quite a spectacle and seeing the Endeavour replica for him, a Captain Cook nut was amazing.
In the last photo above of Endeavour we also see a voyaging waka next to her, so small in comparison. When you consider the size of the waka, the achievements 800 years ago of her crew are equally incredible.
The fleet stayed at Oke Bay, Bay of Islands, on Wednesday night.
 
AND REMEMBER WOODYS – PLEASE RESPECT DEAN’S COPYWRIGHT ON THE PHOTOS

Somethings Not Right Here + Woodys On Tour

IMG_2684

Somethings Not Right Here + Woodys On Tour
 
I was sent the above photo by Bruce Yarnton, it had both Bruce and I confused for way too long…………
Interesting mix of vessels – anyone able to tell us what was happening?
 
Woodys On Tour
The WW t-shirts crop up all over the world – in the first photo below we see Allan & Pamela Hooper on board the 1922 schooner – Ladona, they spent a week sailing on her from Rockland in Penobscot Bay, USA.  The other photos see Allan out and about in Maine.

Sailing on Ladona Rockland

Woody yachty Steve Horsley has been in South Africa shooting Lions (only joking) it was a family wedding and Steve was flying the WW flag in Simonds Town where the Naval base is situated. Rumour has it he bought the Captain Pugwash boat (the Black Pig) to replace Ngatira 🙂
IMG_2759

Tamati – Lake Taupo Launch

Screen Shot 2019-10-15 at 5.18.19 AM

Tamati –  Lake Taupo Launch
All we know is the date, 1937, and the location – Lake Taupo.
Hopefully the Drake brothers will be able to help us out 🙂
Input from Nigel Drake – This is the Bailey and Lowe built Tamati now converted to a paddle boat.

Woodys Classics Weekend Stillwater Picnic Cruise – this Sunday

The key times are below – I will be emailing more details to those that have RSVP’ed later today.

Screen Shot 2019-10-15 at 12.32.39 PM

The Refurbishment Of Tamariki

The Refurbishment Of Tamariki
Todays story is a video essay on the refurbishment of Tamariki, the 45’ Gary Wheeler designed ’spirit of tradition’  ketch owned by Peter Mortimer, father of CYA Chairman James Mortimer.
The video was filmed and edited by the very talented Roger Mills, a friend of Peter’s
Post the refurbishment Peter has been cruising the Pacific and attended the 2019 Australian Wooden Boat Festival in Hobart – in fact the only Kiwi boat in attendance. Roger joined Peter for the homeward leg – Hobart > Picton.
Enjoy – it is a great insight into the 7 month project – wonderful work, well done everyone that rubbed up against Tamariki during this labour of love.
Screen Shot 2019-09-03 at 3.24.37 PM
RSVP– you and your boats name + approx. numbers to sueedwards@xtra.co.nz

A-Class Racing on the Waitemata

IMG_5969

A-Class Racing on the Waitemata

Today’s feature photo is from a photo essay that Mike McGehan sent in. If my eyes and memory are correct Left > Right

A15 Prize, A17 Ngatoa, A14 Ngataringa, A18 Tawera, A27 Arohia

Anyone able to put an approx. date on the photo?

Mondays WW story will be a goody30+ photos from the camera of Kere Kemp who has just returned from the 2019 Port Townsend Wooden Boat Festival. Great photos from a gent with a good key for woody talent 🙂 A tease below

IMG_1942

IMG_1981

Screen Shot 2019-09-03 at 3.24.37 PM

RSVP – you and your boats name + approx. numbers to sueedwards@xtra.co.nz

 

 

Happy Hours V13

 

20190908_101958_resized

 

Photo below taken when Happy Hours was collected ready to transport to Alan Craig’s shed.

 

HAPPY HOURS V13
 
I have been contacted by Alan Craig from Craig Marine looking for he next owner of the18’ mullet boat – Happy Hours V13. 
Built by Billy Rogers in 1949 to an earlier Logan design, she was a copy of Secret  (V3) but is a much fuller boat so must have been modified during building. She was first owned by Billy Rogers’ brother in-law and then by Lieutenant Commander J. Lennox-King.
 
Happy Hours is currently sitting in one of Alan’s sheds waiting to be finished. But Alan commented that he has not been near it in a couple of years, he is a very in demand wooden boat builder and the current work schedule is very motor-boat focussed.
The yacht was acquired from the NZ Traditional Boatbuilding School before being passed on to Alan. 
I understand that Alan’s exceptions in terms of a price are not great, he is more interested in Happy Hours going to a good home.
Alan has the mast and rudder plus fittings etc for it too.
 
So woodys – anyone looking for a classic wooden boat project?
tumblr_mqrz6dQDco1r5uev7o1_400
23-09-2019 Input from Robin Elliott

Owners:
N.C. Wensor 1949?/52+?; F. Simkins 1955?/56+?; Peter & Frederick Boyle 1958+?; R.D. Wood 1959?/60+?; Lt.Cdr J. Lennox-King 1961?/68+? ; Dean Herbison 2007/16+?; Alan Craig ?/2019+?

Happy Hours was built for Noel Wensor (billy’s Bro’ in law) in 1949. Lennox-King did not own her until the early 1960’s. Dean Herbison bought her in 2007 when she was hauled out at Okahu Bay.

JEANETTE C23 – Updated Story

JEANETTE 001

Start of a cruise down the gulf. Barbara, Dick’s elder daughter at the tiller.

JEANETTE 002

Jeanette cruising. Ngataringa coming up astern. Takapuna shore in background.

JEANETTE 003

Wet decks from stiff westerly. Running close during race to Islington Bay. Dinghy lashed on deck for more speed. Rangitoto on port bow.

JEANETTE 004

(This picture dated 28 January 1961, so must have been sent to Bob when he’d returned to the UK. ) Jeanette at the start of the Trans Tasman Race. Bob. Bill Patterson at tiller. Bob Watham in the cockpit. Harry Pope up forward.

JEANETTE C23 – Updated Story
 
Back in June 2019 I did a story on the 1933, Ted Le Huquet built yacht Jeanette, WW link below, this prompted Drew Glasgow to send in the photos above taken in the early 1950’s by his late father Bob Glasgow, who often sailed in her, together with Dick and Barbara Bakewell, who bought the yacht off Ted Le Huquet.
According to Bob’s description, written on the back of one photograph, she was a 34′ marconi-rigged cutter.
 
I have captioned each photo with text supplied by Drew from the back of the photos, penned by his father.
Question of the day – any one able to tell us how the above yacht ended up in Portsmouth, Rhode Island, USA? Is it a Kiwi boat or just been named by a Kiwi?
Screen Shot 2019-08-31 at 5.41.45 PM

Fiddlers Green

Screen Shot 2019-08-24 at 2.02.13 PM

Screen Shot 2019-08-24 at 2.01.41 PM

Screen Shot 2019-08-24 at 2.03.57 PM

Screen Shot 2019-08-24 at 2.04.08 PM

FIDDLERS GREEN

It is believed that Fiddlers Green was built c.1930/40’s and probably started life as a motor launch used for fishing and accessing the holiday homes in the Abel Tasman area. In 1976 she was rescued and converted to a sailing ketch and given the name Fiddlers Green

She measures 14’ in length, has a 5’8” beam and draws 2’6”. Her hull is kauri and the deck, cabin-top and framing timbers were replaced in 1990. She is a regular attendee at the Antique Classic Boat Show at Lake Rotoiti (Nelson Lakes) and in 2018 won the award for best sail boat.

She is for sale on trademe and comes with a custom built (2012) galvanised trailer.

Looking For A Clinker Dinghy?

Chatting with boat builder Greg Lee he told Dale, the yard foreman is currently building a clinker dinghy to a Roy Pariss pattern. So far, Dale has glued all the lands  and just put in the surfboard clear epoxy risen because it is UV stable (photos below)Another coat or two and he will start on the ribs. When finished the intention is to sell her. Knowing Dale and his work she will be a stunner.

IMG_2171

BOAT PORN

Adrian Pawson is mid-way thru a re-fit on his Frostbite – Kiteroa, 1st coat of gloss went on yesterday – looking very smart 🙂

Kiteroa 1

 

Edelweiss – Sailing Sunday

Screen Shot 2019-08-10 at 5.37.38 PM

Screen Shot 2019-08-10 at 5.36.59 PM

EDELWEISS – Sailing Sunday
 
Edelweiss was a triple skin kauri sloop designed and built at home by ‘Minkie’ Goodman – a foreman at Chas. Bailey and Son. She was built for, and sailed in, the 1956 Suva raced which was won by Tom Buchanan’s Wanderer. Edelweiss was 3rd. Her dimensions are LOA 33’, LOW 29’, Beam 8’6”, and a draught of 6’3”.
Under Goodman’s ownership she had no motor but when he sold it to Kay Perry she had a temperamental Ford 10 100E fitted. She had no head  at the time the late Sam Bestall bought her in 1963.
John Newsham, who sent in the details commented that he joined her in Aug 1963 aged 21 and sailed with Sam till 1971. John soon became senior hand and later relieving skipper as well. Bestall owned Edwlweiss for approx. 6 years. After a major refit she was sold to Tauranga and Bestall bought the 39’ ferro Stewart sloop Wendella from it’s builder Claude Spooner.    
 
During Bestall’s ownership he had a head fitted and later a Simpson Lawrence (UK) gas cooker with oven installed and a Volvo Penta MD2 diesel. 
John commented that they went away for a weekend cruise almost every weekend between Labour Day and Easter and often had a week at the Barrier in March and the Xmas cruises were ‘legendary’.
 
Sam later had the 40’ Choy Lee ketch Sarrie built in Taiwan and he sailed this with new his wife and her 3 children from Taiwan to the Red Sea and later from the UK to NZ via the Panama Canal.
 
(Photo credit – top photo ex Playdate magazine (Kerridge Odeon) and smaller photo ex Northland Gazette) 
WCW Riverhead2019
 

Wellington Yacht – Mabel

IMG_1952

IMG_1951

Wellinton Yacht – Mabel

I had reason to be at Half Moon Bay marina during the week and I spotted the above yacht on the hard. I understand it has come up from Wellington and is 120+ years old. That folks is all I know.

Keen to put a name to the yacht and learn more about her.
Also had a peek at the 1898 Arch Logan – Rainbow A7, that is having a birthday in one of the sheds. Boatbuilder Paul Tingey is the man overseeing the project – lots of uroxsys work on the agenda.
Update below ex Jason Prew – is he correct?
Screen Shot 2019-08-04 at 10.45.18 AM
Input from Gavin Pascoe – My friend owned her for the past 5 years and just sold. She is Mabel built by Chas jr and Walter Bailey in 1895. sailed to Nelson via Wellington in 1917. Then to Lyttelton in the 1930’s, then to Wellington post WWII. She rated at 2.5 but was also a bit of a cruiser – not strictly a racer. She was a long time rather confusedly thought to be a Logan built 1905, I think this is due to her having come from Lyttelton and somebody thought, oh there was an old Logan down there, this must be it. Even a sideways glimpse at her will tell you she is a Bailey, and definitely not anything post 1897

Galatea

IMG_8496

IMG_8498

IMG_8497

Mystery Yacht – 28-07-2019 – solved – it is Galatea

I have been contacted by Denis Woodward who has a collection of signed Winkleman sailing photographs asking for help to ID the yacht above. If we are really good we might even be able to put a name to the crew 🙂
Mystery Spirit of Tradition 
I know with that engine well and leg I’m stretching things a little but folks we are going to see a lot more of this style of craft as the price of marina’s continues to climb. David Vaassen spotted – Sprat, at Orams dry dock and was wondering if we could find out more about her – design, builder, engine etc. At first I thought it was one of the new Greg Salthouse launches but no, Sprat is not quite as beautiful to the eye 🙂 More work boat styling.
chzEx4y9RD2ESfvoIbVmgw
UPDATE from Tim Jackson

Sprat is a Badnam launch designed by the late David Thomas . Built in the Bay of Islands and recently sold out of Wanaka. She has a builders plate in her.Here is some blurb about her genesis, ex the Wooden Boat Association of NSW, Sydney – 2012 newsletter.

 

 

 

IMG_4593

IMG_6232

IMG_4595

Another woody from my club reporter 🙂  location = Santorini. Might be glass 😦
65028241_2391800927546746_1866603683173629952_n

The Portland

IMG_2451

IMG_2452

THE PORTLAND

 
Several months ago Thames woody, Clive Monds was visiting  the Catlins area at the bottom of the South Island and chanced upon The Portland moored at the mouth of the Catlins River, see location map/photo below.

Unfortunately he was en-route to rendezvous with people so did not have much time but he did glean the following from people who lived close by.
The Portland arrived from ‘up north’ some years ago with intentions to be used for some tourism venture. She had, it seemed from the twin stacks been repowered at some point. The venture has not come to pass and she has sat for some time, rotting into the mud. There was talk to the effect ‘you could have bought her for $5’. People Clive spoke to had no idea what is happening to her. 
Clive is interested if some to learn more about the vessel – can anyone shed light on her origins etc. ?
image003
26-10-2019 Input (unconfirmed) by Michael Raynes

The Portland built 1910 by Geo Niccol of Auckland for John Wilson Walkworth {brother of  Nathaniel Wilson founder of Wilsons Cement Woks on the Mahurangi River Warkworth] carrying 160 lb bags of cement to Auckland. Sold 1918 to Wilsons NZ Cement Co of Portland Whangarei. Sold 1926 to Aspden Shipping Auckland trading from Auckland up north to Awanui, general cargo up butter back also running to Whakatane. Sold c.1936 to a Foxton company running between Foxton & Wellington. Sold c.1938 to Puponga  shipping Co Nelson carrying coal from Port Puponga Golden  Bay to & from the Puponga Coal Co to  Nelson, Onekaka Iron Works , Tarakohe Cement Works & Wellington. Sold 1946 Westhaven Co Nelson carrying milling machery & general cargo to Westhaven Inlet {Whanganui Inlet] Northern West Coast bringing out  timber from Mangarakau wharf to Nelson & Wellington also carrying cargoes in & out of Golden  Bay Ports of Tarakohe, Waitapu Collingwood &  Milnethorpe   [Dolomite]  And Tasman Bay ports Motueka, Mapua & Nelson. Also Marlbrough Sound Ports of The portage Nydia Bay Havelock, Titirangi. Plus many others to Wellington. Sold to Karamea Shipping Co Nelson c.1968, continued on same runs. Made one visit to Kaiapoi  1967. Struck rock or submerged object 1972 in Cook Strait off Wellington, beached at Island Bay, re-floated, patched up at Evans Bay tio by Te Aroha to Nelson 1972. Sold as / is to group of fishermen in Dunedin, repaired at Careys  Bay yards made an illegal  trip down to Auckland Island area with mutton birders. Sold  to Mr Matheson of Owaka taken down and moored at Pounawea upriver from where she is now. The  Portland was advertised for sale 2002, in trade a boat didn’t sell. Article in NZ Marine News that she was to be taken up to Dunedin for slipping 2011. Didn’t happen. Sank at her moorings, struck by log in flood, patched  & re-floated. Sold to an Aucklander c.2016, on trial run down river she started to leak & was run up onto beach where she is now. New owner was advised his agent sold  her for $5. Was going to turn her in to back packers accommodation – so far. Edited by Alan H

The Restoration Of Ida

P1060326

P1060339

THE RESTORATION OF IDA

New Zealand’s A class fleet grows steadily larger as yet another important Kiwi yacht is restored to her former glory. Chairman of the Classic Yacht Charitable Trust John Street and boat builder Wayne Olsen visited Sydney in August 2018 to inspect Ida, the 45’ Charles Bailey Jnr. designed and built in 1895 by C&W Bailey gaff rigged cutter. In racing mode with hers spars she has a LOA of 58’, a beam of 8’ draws 6’6”.

Ida was for sale as the current owners (20 years) had reached a point where, due to ill health, they were unable to complete the planned deck restoration nor maintain her to the standard they previously took pride in. Her owners had raced her regularly in the classic yacht races on Sydney Harbour with the Sydney Amateur Sailing Club at Mosman Bay and the Balmain Sailing Club, where she won hands down.

Wayne’s assessment was that, while the hull appears sound, being triple skinned kauri, it i was unclear what will be found once the inner layer is pealed back. She was in poor condition with much of the rest of the boat needing replacement. John recognised that Ida is an important part of New Zealand’s boat building history and a deal was done to acquire her, her owners  generously donated 20 kauri deck beams (220 x 13 X 5cm) and a spinnaker pole. John then arranged shipment back to New Zealand where she was moved to Horizon Boats shed in Stillwater.

Yesterday (06-07-2019) The CYA members were invited to view IDA before the deck is fully replaced. I understand the target is to have her sailing this summer.

You will see from the photos above she is a whippet, look at her keel and with just 3 ton of lead hanging of it, you can imagine a slightly damp crew 😉

Photos below of Ida as launched, ‘recent’ Aust.photos, and as she arrived at Horizon Boats + the early days of the restoration.

You can read more about Ida’s history on the CYCT website here

Details & some photos ex CYA and the Classic Yacht Charitable Trust websites.

22-09-2019 Update : photos below of Ida hauled out, when still in Australia ex David Campbell-Morrison

Hawkes Bay Mystery Motorsailer

Screen Shot 2019-06-01 at 3.26.21 PM

Screen Shot 2019-06-01 at 3.26.09 PM

Hawkes Bay Mystery Motorsailer

Todays photos come to us fro Lew Redwood’s fb, the name of the yacht is unknown, but we know it was owned by J.A. Louis Hay.
Again the location is also unknown, but the photo is tagged MTG Hawkes Bay which is – Museum Theatre Gallery, Napier – so that might be a big help ID’ing the location.
Interesting ‘funnel’ , I assume for a solid fuel stove. And speaking of wood stoves on boats (my dream) Mondays WW story ticks a lot of my boxes – wood stove + a Ford Model T wheel / helm.
Harold Kidd Input – I’ve scratched my head over this one before. J A Louis Hay was a well-known Napier Architect and amateur musician. Just a guess, he designed he boat himself and had it built locally at Westshore by R. Farquhar, very possibly the unnamed one he built in September 1915 before Hay went overseas to France, She was 26’6″x6′ with a 4hp Monarch. The “funnel” is probably a dry exhaust.
Bonus Read
I’m a big fan of the UK website Classic Sailor, it started out as a magazine, published by a past editor of Classic Boat magazine, but then after a few issues, went to a weblog format. They have some great articleds- check out this one on the restoration of the yawl – Wayward – see link below.

Jeanette – C23 Sailing Sunday

IMG_5974

Jeanette C23 – Sailing Sunday 

Todays photo comes to us from Mike McGehan and is of (to me) an unnamed yacht with the sail number C23. I suspect from other others sent to me by Mike, this photo could be dated in the late 1940’s.

Can one of the sailing Woodys ID the boat for us?
Sorry – short and sweet today, woke up at 2.30am and realised I had not done a story………….
Harold Kidd Input
Ted Le Huquet built her for himself in 1933. Dick Bakewell bought her and took her on the 1961 TransTasman race. Ted got Parkinsons later in life. I used to see him walk slowly down Church Street, row alone out to JEANETTE at her moorings in Torpedo Bay, set the tiller, painfully make his way forward, hoist the staysail, drop the mooring and sail out of the bay without any fuss, hoisting the mainsail and then the jib on the way.
What a seaman!
24-06 HDK – Dick Bakewell sold JEANETTE to Evan Berghan in 1974. Berghan did a circumnavigation with her from April 1981. He finished up in Canada but I’m not sure if JEANETTE survives there. 

Gaff Schooner Collides With Container Ship – Overseas Report

Screen Shot 2019-06-09 at 4.56.46 PM

GAFF SCHOONER COLLIDES WITH CONTAINER SHIP & SUNKS – Overseas Report
 

The gaff schooner Elbe No. 5 collided with a container ship in the Elbe river (Germany) last weekend. The boat sank after the collision with the rescuers managing to rescue 43 passengers.

The historic 1883 built, 121’ vessel had only just returned to Hamburg’s waters after it had spent eight months in a Danish shipyard undergoing a €1.5 million renovation and was relaunched only days before the collision.

She was struck by a 462′ container ship, the Astrosprinter and suffered serious damage and sank, though rescuers were able to secure the wreck relatively close to the surface.
The container ship continued its voyage, having suffered almost no damage. Apparently, the container ship was out of her channel and likely at fault.
So woodys this serves as a warning to be very careful out there, particularly as the Auckland council continue to expand the container port into OUR harbour…………….
Screen Shot 2019-06-09 at 5.00.41 PM

Rangi Rua (Rangi II)

 

 

IMG_0155

RANGI RUA (Rangi II)
 
I was recently contacted by Terry Hall in regard to his ex yacht Ranginui Rua, Terry commented that when he bought her she was named Rangi II (as seen in the sailing photo above) but when he tried to register her with Lloyds – London the name was refused as there was a passenger  ship with that name,  Terry had a Maori friend, a chief in Northland who suggested trying Rangi Rua –  Rua being #2 in Maori, he sent this off and it was accepted. Thence the ‘different’ name on the hauled out photos.
 
Rangi Rua was built by Mark Anthony in Freeman’s Bay and is a Woollacott 42′, Terry believes it was extended with extra frames. Her and a gaff rigged boat called Marpu were probably the last kauri boats to be built in Freemans Bay. Bad luck followed both yachts – Rangi Rua was lost in the Trans Tasman race in 1948 and Marpu was lost in the Pacific on its way home from Japan.
 
Terry owned Rangi Rua for many years and had her moored in the Town Basin in Whangarei in front of the wharf shed. He still has the log book which he kept when he sold her. In the photos of her on the slip, Terry is in the white overalls with his boatbuilder son, Frank and crew.
SUNDAY QUIZ
Yesterday Angus Rogers was doing what most of us were doing i.e. nothing 🙂 so he took an old photo out of its frame to clean the glass. Do we think Angus has ID’ed the yachts correctly ?  Sail numbers starting with A17 Ngatoa on right working left are A11 Ida, A5 Rawene, A3? Ariki and A16? Little Jim. Some of the anoraks may be able to identify the last two from their sails and shape and the yacht on the right with no numbers showing.
IMG_1769
 

Mahurangi Regatta 2019 – Classic Wooden Boat Movie

Mahurangi Regatta 2019 – Classic Wooden Boat Movie

The weather forecast is for a very average day today so I decided to share some serious eye candy with you. The video above comes to us from the very talented Roger Mills via his drone camera.
Once again Roger was out and about over the regatta weekend and captured some amazing classic woody footage.
I have to comment that it was very pleasing to see the classic woody launches featured, thank you Roger. All to often people forget there are more wooden motorboats afloat on the day than the stick and rag boys 🙂
Enjoy the video – its a goodie.
To view a high res / quality version of the movie – us the link below.

Victory A8

IMG_5972

IMG_5968

VICTORY A8

A great photo above of Victory (I hope my record of sail #’s is correct). This and the bottom photo were sent to me by Mike McGehan. The first woody that can correctly name the 3 yachts (L>R) in the bottom photos wins a waitematawoody t-shirt.
Entries via any way – comments box ofr email to waitematawoodys@gmail.com
HDK will be the judge of the correct names 🙂
Mondays WW story is a very special look at the NZ wooden boating scene from a visitors eye/camera – the owner of the camera is none other than the world’s leading classic wooden boat photographer  – Benjamin Mendlowitz. Ben’s talents are second to none and you will see a gallery of some of our finest woodys presented like never before. This access has been granted to WW by the team at Off Center Harbor. Lots more details tomorrow 😉

Restoration of Te Uira begins

FB_IMG_1539727408050

20181016_081930

 

FB_IMG_1539641729372

RESTORATION OF TE UIRA BEGINS 
 
Pleased to announce that the restoration of 45’ C & W Bailey built (1896) Te Uira has finally begun in Australia.
During the week I was contacted by Colin Grazules with the news – I’ll let Colin tell you the story.
 
“We have constructed a new wee shed to house the old girl and the steel and iron keel has been removed.
At this stage we are envisioning that the restoration back to her original condition should take 2 to 3 years all going well.
The owners wish is to return her to as close to her launch configuration as possible.

We will begin by removing the ribs that were added to stop her leaking in 1898.

But we need your help.

We need if possible a detailed plan of where the original stringers were installed and the triangular beam that sat on top of the floors?
A plan or photos of what the original keel would have looked like would be greatly appreciated.
I have a copy of Robert Brooke’s book ‘Beautiful Boats’ but unfortunately the plans in the book have little detail on this. 

A deck plan would also be of great assistance including including where the original mast step would have been installed etc.

Well this is just the start and I’m hoping this will become an ongoing conversation to ensure that we can do justice to Te Uira and her heritage!!

I intend to post the restoration on the NZ Classic Yacht Forum and on the Cygnet Wooden Boats FB page and will keep you appraised of the progress.”

 

Below are two videos of the keel removal.

Previous Input From Harold Kidd

TE UIRA (usually shortened in Oz to UIRA) was built by C.& W. Bailey and launched on 17th October 1896 for Gidgeon Palmer of Melbourne as a 5 rater.
She was taken across by the steamer TARAWERA with Chas. Bailey Jr going with her to settle her in.
She was quite successful in Melbourne but came up against SAYONARA, the bigger Fife-designed cutter.
She raced in Melbourne with the St. Kilda club for many years, converted to a Marconi rig in 1925.
 
You can also eat / see more here  https://wordpress.com/post/waitematawoodys.com/13298

Awa Iti

Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 10.26.22 AM

Screen Shot 2019-05-10 at 10.26.40 AM

AWA ITI 

Awa Iti is a 26’ Gladden motor sailer that has been in one extended family for the past 40 years, but now it is time to pass on to someone who has the energy to keep this lovely old boat going. Her trademe listing says she’s a comfortable stable & safe boat that is easy to sail and handle. She draws under 3 ft and with her bilge keel she can sit on the mud flats upright. Its a classic Gladden which means for its length there is lots of room for a family to enjoy the inner gulf.  

This boat needs some TLC, but is currently sailable. Cabin top, varnish and hull painted and anti-foul done 2018.

 Powered with a “WaterMota Sea Wolf” petrol motor (based on Ford Escort motor) with a heat exchange unit Waterline length 7.1m 23.3ft – Beam widest point 2.775m 9.1ft  – Draft 863mm 2’10”. Currently moored at Northcote Point swing mooring. 

Currently the bidding sits at c$2000 & the reserve has been met so Awa Iti could be a very good buy for someone entering the classic woody movement 🙂

 

Rangi B16

B16

RANGI B16

I have recently been contacted by Andrew Mason who while going thru a collection of old photos, came across the one above by H Winkelmann, sporting the sail number B16. Andrew was asking if anyone knew if she was still around and if so, what became of her.

I was able to point Andrew in the direction of a comment by Harold Kidd from back in April 2015 where HDK commented on a story / photo ex Chris McMullen on a mystery ship (yacht) wreck.
HDK advised that B16 was the Bailey & Lowe keel yacht Rangi, which had broken up when she came ashore at Norfolk Island in 1951.
Anyone able to tell us more about Rangi prior to 1951?
Harold Kidd Input – She was built as the fishing boat or “schnapper boat” for line fishing by Bailey & Lowe in 1903 as SCHOPOLO for a Greek fisherman called Nicholas. She was very like if not a twin to the Bailey & Lowe fishing boat WHITE HEATHER built for J. Wheeler. Logan Bros’ VICTORY and FRANCES were the same sort of boats. Motor fishing launches made them uneconomical very shortly after and they were converted to most satisfactory yachts because of their extra beam.
SCHOPOLO was sold out of the fishing industry and became LORELEI in 1919, changed hands and was renamed RANGI around 1923.
She took part in the 1931, 1948 and 1951 TransTasman races but was lost at Norfolk Is on her return in 1951.
Input from Jim Lott – Rangi was owned for a number of years by Con Thode’s father. Con learned his early sailing on board and spoke often of his time on board, and his sadness when she was wrecked after his father sold her.

I have been away overseas on “Victoria” (another Auckland ‘woody’, since 2011 and am now back living in NZ.
Currently we won the Camelot “Mokoia” (Stewart) and also owned “Vectis” (Woolacott) in the 1970’s.

Waitoa F10

IMG_5976

WAITOA F10

 I have been sent the above photos of Waitoa F10, by Mike McGehan. Mike’s father, Mervyn is seen in the 1st photo on launch day 1947.
Previously on WW there has been debate as to a photo and details supplied by Ken Ricketts around his experience of the yacht (WW link below) as a result of Mike sending me the above photo and details, we can now safely assume that Ken has his wires crossed. https://waitematawoodys.com/2017/03/26/waitoa-sailing-sunday/
Previously on WW the McGahan family and Harold Kidd have commented on Waitoa’s provenance (link below)
Comparing the photos (below), I’m now happy to put this debate to bed 🙂

Make sure you log in to WW on tomorrow – great story / photos on the evolution of the 1912 Harvey & Lang launch – Silens

Building Fritha – Sailing Sunday

Fritha 4

Building Fritha –  Sailing Sunday

Following on from the stunning WW post on the McMullen & Wing built 74’ brigantine – Fritha, Chris McMullen has shared with us a gallery of photos from the build.
In Chris’s words – it shows a bunch of mainly young guys building a proper sailing ship. Chris commented how lucky they all were to have had that opportunity. The photos should be credited to M&W ex apprentice Grant Thomas who was the leading hand on Fritha.
 
The Fritha was built traditionally but certainly not by eye. You may notice the cabin trunks were well underway before the hull was planked. This was possible because M&W had a very experienced team. The workmanship got better every boat they built but the estimate of time was exceeded. (Chris stressed how lucky they were to have an understanding owner who appreciated what he got). Further, it became almost impossible to get good wood. Chris’s business partner Eric Wing was by then running their haul out yard at Westhaven.
Sadly “Fritha” was the last real boat M&W built. M&W was sold and became a ship yard rather than a boatyard.
While most people associate M&W as metal boat builders, Chris said that they did that, as we had to. There is nothing wrong with a wooden boat providing it is built properly of good timber. There was no wood left so it was metal or frozen snot. They chose to build metal boats but employed mainly woodworkers.
Chris would like to pass on thanks to the late owner of “Fritha” Mr JR Butland and the loyal team he had that built some beautiful yachts. 
 
View the previous WW story on Fritha here – lots of photos  https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/02/24/fritha/

Fritha 18