The Sad Demise of Norwest

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The Sad Demise of Norwest

Back in early 2013 Zach Matich sent me the top photo of Norwest. Zach also supplied the details below.
This last weekend Jason Prew was mooching over on the West Coast and snapped the photos showings the final resting place of Norwest on the Kaipara Harbour.
“The Norwest was built in Whakapirau in 1909 by Arthur Forester. She was named the Kuaka, the Maori name for Curlew, and had “Kuaka” written on her port side and “Curlew” on her starboard side. She was built for a Mr Adams who had a pear orchard just down the harbour from Whakapirau on what is now the Cullen farm. She was designed so that Mr Adams crippled daughter could wheel her wheelchair around the deck, and was used for transporting fruit to Helensville for the markets. She was powered by a Union Standard single cylinder ‘Make and Brake’ motor and had a swinging cradle for 6 wet cell batteries. This motor is now in the private collection of Darcy Sterling at Maungataroto.
After lying idle for some years the Kuaka was sold to Mr Cliff of Paparoa in 1919. Mr Cliff took her to Pahi and re-corked and painted her and added a new piece to the stern post which was suffering from dry rot. he used her for taking picnic parties down the harbour and moored her when not in use up the Paparoa Creek behind what is now the Paparoa Pub. There was a huge flood in Paparoa in 1923 and the Kuaka was picked up by the flood, carried over the bridge and placed in a paddock on the other side with no damage to her at all. When Mr Cliff passed away in 1924 his sons sold her to a Dr Marshall, from, I believe up Port Albert way who in turn sold her to Mr West who owned West’s Timber Mill in Helensville. It was at this time that she was renamed the ‘Norwest’ after Nora West, Mr Wests wife. She was used for about the next 20 years up until 1945 towing logs all over the Kaipara Harbour, and then in about 1945 Harold Stanaway bought her, followed by Dink Jolly, and then Everard Judd bought her for $250.00 for towing barges. By this time she was in a terrible state so he employed Rodney Morgan, a boat builder to more or less rebuild the hull and cabin.
Everard Judd sold her to Murray Prictor of Port Albert in the late 60’s who is turn sold her soon after to somebody on the East Coast and the history is pretty vague after leaving the West Coast. We do know that some time was spent up the Clevedon Creek and we also know that she has been used as a fishing boat on that coast. 
She was brought back to the Kaipara by Stafford and Rosemary Hill.
Unsure who currently owns her.”
Update 11-07-2019. photos below taken in 2015 by Dave Stanaway
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Looking For Winter Woody Project

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Looking For Winter Woody Project

The 27’ Roy Paris carvel planked launch above has just popped up on trademe, all the hard work has been done by a passionate owner those circumstances have changed and the boat has to go, saying that it’s not a fire sale. A lot of quality work has gone into her.
The hull and cabin has been completely stripped back inside and out, caulking removed, glued and splined and fibre glassed over. Painted in marine primer and recently sanded for top coats. New duck board with built in live bait tank.
She comes with a reconditioned 100hp turbo charged Yanmar factory marinised engine and gear box, with all the wiring, gushes, controls, pipes etc from Moon Engines + brand new prop shaft and the prop has been balanced and coated in PropSpeed

As her owner commented – it’s an easy winter project for the right person to finish off for use this summer.

Anyone know her name?

Classic Wooden Boat Project

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Classic Wooden Boat Project

It’s been the week of project boats – for some reason they just keep popping up, thanks to Ian McDonald for the trade me heads up.

Today’s woody was built c.1930, carvel planked kauri and 26’ in length. She has a Nissan TD23 diesels engine, not sure of the condition. The listing says the hull is in good condition – but its a bit hard to tell, that grey undercoat is a bit like black stockings e.g. hides a magnitude of sins 😉

Currently hauled out in Kerikeri, Northland.

Keen to learn more about this woody – name?, designer / builder? – anyone able to help out?

 

Edith

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EDITH

I was recently contacted by Vanessa Bailey in regard to her grandad parents displacement picnic boat Edith. Edith has been restored in a shed at Diary Flat by Arthur Nealy and Dominic Happe over the last 2+ years. Edith is a kauri clinker build and launched in 1925, 16’ in length.

During the restoration Edith her was paint stripped back to bare wood both internally and externally then coated with 5 coats of marine paint, a new Nanni diesel engine was fitted (est. speed 8 knots). In addition new fuel tank, new electrical, new propeller shaft and new propeller was fitted.

I have asked for some photos of the project, so hopefully we can see the work involved in bringing this beauty back to as launched (or better) condition. Congratulations to all involved.

Check out the very impressive trailer (below)

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Diana White

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DIANA WHITE

Today’s woody story is a tad out there – we have a 38’ ex lifeboat looking for a new home. Well to be honest we are really looking for a woody with a big shed and lots of vision. Owner John Fairburn wrote to me saying he had too many projects on the go and needed to find a new home. I’ll let John tell you in his words:

“Diana White has crossed the Manukau Bar in extreme conditions without a worry and travelled at sea when no-one else was, is now for sale. It had always been a slipway boat until it’s 1st private owner previous to me took it over and the huge anodes that earthed the SSB radio brought on a softening of timber through electrolysis around bronze, stainless and galv steel plus alloy cabin.

A lifeboat has many compartments held together with many bolts and special bronze and galvanised steel framework that had begun to rust in a few spots, so it took a bit to get back to bare hull to work on any soft stuff, and then I was going to use epoxied timber to rebuild. It’s a double ender 37’6″ x 12’0″ x 3’6″ with 2 x 23″ propellers in tunnels and weighed 13 tons. 

I was going to re-power and fit twin rudders so sold the 2 D series Fords that returned a litre per nautical mile at sea. At the moment it’s a bare hull so easier to survey (tap hull for soft timber) and is much reduced in weight and therefore easier to transport. I was in process selling props / shafts / stern-tubes / stuffing boxes and couplings, rudder, stainless bow rails and alloy swing down mast with radar reflector and 2 x stainless fuel tanks and the guy across road wants to turn hull into a house/cabin but a local Katikati boat owner reminded me of Waitemata Woodys, so if someone wants to pay me $3000 they can have the lot complete with RNLI drawings (1 inch to the foot) so they can plan their finished project.

I’ve still got a big oak tiller that has bronze end fitting that clicks into bronze shoe for manual steering and a special cutting tool to clear propellers through tunnel access ports.”

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Lady Ellen Restoration June ’19 Update

LADY ELLEN RESTORATION UPDATE – JUNE 2019

Just received the above photos and story below from Bruce Mitchinson, as before, I’ll let Bruce talk you thru the report.
“Over the weekend we cleared out the boatbuilders shed ready to lay out the plywood cores for the cabin coamings, which are to be clad in Iroko inside and out.

This is the last of the major woodworking, apart from the engine box and associated trim and accessories, and fitting the coamings back on the boat.
Galley is complete ready to go in after the interior paint job.
Below deck the cabin woodwork is done and ready for paint, which is all white, with varnish door frames and jambs.

Unfortunately our painter has a hand injury so we are on the lookout for a new painter at the moment. 

We also lost our engineer, Ken Jaspers, who looked after our engine through its recondition, sourced all the new parts and running gear, and had things primed ready for assembly and paint.
Ken battled bone marrow cancer for the last year and was still working on our job up to a week before he checked out.
There will be a plaque for Ken, ‘Engineer to Lady Ellen’ that will go on the bulkhead in the engine bay. 
The trailer and engine which became a feature in Ken and Eileen’s driveway for over a year, is now up in the boatyard, ready for Brian to finish the assembly.
All the finished parts are stacked in the shower cubicle in the shed, ready to bolt on.
 
Still a lot of work to do, but it looks like a boat now.”

Merryweather

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MERRYWEATHER
 

I was recently contacted by Lionel Sands of ‘Sea Craft’ fame – as most of you will know, Lionel’s late father, Sandy Sands, started Sea Craft Ltd in 1946 building clinker boats. Today they build the Haines Hunter range of fibreglass boats and are still based in Ellerslie. 

Lionel was contacted by one of his dealers in Gore in regard to an old Sea Craft boat that they had come across. Lionel commented that looking at the photos supplied the boat appears to be in very good original condition including the Ford 10 motor that is also original. Lionel contacted WW to see if there was any interest in the boat.
 
The story goes like this – the Gore dealer, Brad Inder from Inder Marine, was asked to price a re-power on a larger glass boat and the customer is wanting to sell some of his old cars and boats. The vessel that the dealer thought might spark some interest almost the classic wooden boat movement was a 1955 Seacraft powered by a Ford Prefect motor, pictured above.
 
So Woodys my question today is – any interest in this iconic woody? and what do we think she is worth? A nice winter project for one of the lake boys 😉
 
BOB SALTHOUSE RIP
Sadly today I have to advise that boat designer / builder Bob Salthouse passed away peacefully yesterday morning. While he had not been in good health for a long time and his passing was not unexpected, the event marks another milestone in the Salthouse boatbuilding dynasty. I read several years ago that Bob had designed over 750 boats – I would doubt if anyone in NZ has come even close to that, ever, and even more impressive – most are still afloat.
A sad day for the expended families given the recent death of brother John.