An Epic Tale of Whalers, Fishermen,  Farmers & Commercial Launch Masters

Prima Donna built by Lanes 1911 for Herman & Darcey Baldick 001

Primadonna built by Lanes for Ernie & Darcey Baldick 001

Primadonna and One of Bob Swansons boats 001

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An Epic Tale of Whalers, Fishermen,  Farmers & Commercial Launch Masters
 

The story below without doubt is the best to appear on WW, author Pete Beech talks at one stage about writing a book – he needs to. Surely there is a funding channel available – what’s the literary equivalent of ‘NZ On Air’?

The story came about via the recent WW story on the ex whaler chaser – Primmadona and her relocation from the South to Aucklands Waitemata waters. I will let Pete tell you his story, as he told me – its a cracker – enjoy
 
As an aside I spotted Pete’s ‘work’ boat – Tutanekai, mentioned in the story in Queen Charlotte Sound two years ago, I admired her then, sadly I was too busy pushing bacon and eggs down the gullet at the rather swanky, Bay of Many Coves resort, to say hi – my loss, but I’ll be back. Photos of her at the WW link below:
 
Previous WW Primadonna stories:
PART ONE
Kia Ora Alan,
Thanks for making contact, I was sent a link to your site by my sister who lives on her yacht in an Auckland marina. She thought I’d be interested in your story on our old waka, Primadonna.
You and I obviously have a lot in common, 40 yrs ago there were a lot of old Sounds launches coming to the end of their days, my old dad worked for Ernie Lane as a young man then for Jack Morgan and Rodger Carey.
He and his old mates had been Sounds farmers, whalers , fishermen and commercial launch masters, when ever they got together conversation would always revert to “Boats ! “
We lived in a bay down the Sounds, old pa could identify the older boats by the sound of their exhausts, before they rounded the points and came into view. The old guys would tell you who built them, what year, how much they cost, what they were planked out of, some were sister ships (2 keels cut out of the same log) where the logs were sourced from for the planking, what timber they used for the ribs, what make of engine they used, how much it cost, what horse power they developed and how many GPH they burnt and  what revs  they run at.
They took pride in knowing the whole whakapapa of all the old waka, how many hours the engines did until they were worn out and rebuilt or replaced, in those days after 5/ 10 yrs they would replace with bigger more powerful engines, they would also tell you how the engine was taken out of one boat and put into another and so on.
I grew up hearing all these oral histories and like a couple of your writers mentioned the accuracy of some of these stories was lost in the telling, then my old dad passed on and I got to thinking that if someone doesn’t write down these oral histories within 50 years, they will pass from living memory and be lost to time.
So I went around and interviewed a number of the old timers and collected all the photos I could, so pleased I did because those old boys are all gone now and their kids tossed out their photos.
It was funny, they just loved to talk about their boats, often their wives used to ring me up and say “could you come back and talk to dad again, hes driving me mad ! “
For years I have fostered an ambition to compile a book using this material and feel a bit precious about it, however no one has a monopoly over history and it should be shared, who knows the millennials may have no interested in our nautical treasures .
I have been a mechanic, a marine engineer, a fisherman, a commercial launchmaster a boat builder and for the last 30 years have run an eco tour with our old waka the near 90 yr old Tutanekai. I used to think that the day would come when people would regard the old classics like they do vintage cars and would restore them.
However it hasn’t really happened here and sadly many of our old classics have  been sold out of the area many finding their way to Auckland, I will miss seeing the beautiful counter stern of the old Primmadonna on the Sound, she is so much part of our local history.
I’m so pleased to see the resurgence of traditional boats in Auckland and sure a lot of credit should go to you for the sparking peoples interest in the classic wooden boats.
I remember when she was sold to a feller up on the Foxton River, he eventually put her up for sale but no one wanted her, so he rang me up and said “I’ll sell it to you for bugger all, if you don’t I’m going to cut the side out of her with a chainsaw and turn it into a road side stall. 
I contacted Ian Baldick, nephew of the original owner and said that old girl is your family heritage, you should buy her back, he said OK boy , you’re right, I’ll do it on one condition, that you come with me to bring her back home.
So away we went, made the deal, checked out the old Lister, changed the oil and fuel filters and set off for home, when we got down close to the bar there was a big swell and old Ian said theres something wrong, she’s not lifting to the swell, he said pull her up, he went down into the front cabin, lifted up the bunk swabs and found that the whole forward section was full of river boulders, (this had been done because when you run the old lady on full throttle the stern would suck right down until the water was level with the deck and if you were steering from inside the cabin you couldn’t see over the bow).
We tossed all the boulders overboard and charged out over the bar, there were 3 very big waves, she rode up over the first then put her head down and dove under the second and in what seemed like an eternity finally lifted, rose over the third and burst out into the open sea, old Baldy said if we hadn’t thrown those boulders out she would of gone straight to the bottom !!!
He told me that she had been build too fine with not enough buoyancy in the bow, straight stemmed with no flare, he said that one time they we steaming out around Cape Jackson when they went thru the big rip where the Pacific and the Tasman seas meet there are often half a dozen big waves, he said that she responded the same way a stick does when you throw it into the water. He said you had to shut the throttle off and pull her out of gear,   she went down by the head and kept going down until her buoyancy finally made her shoot back out back wards just like a stick !  He said that on this occasion one of their mates was standing on the foredeck, he said that when this occurred he wrapped himself around the mast and held on for grim death, he said that when she popped out they went forward and couldn’t get their mate to let go of the mast, he said he had squeezed it that hard he ‘d squeezed all the sap out of it and they needed a screw driver to prize his finger nails out of the mast !
I also owned the old Fleetwing at one time, but that’s another story.
The old waka in my shed is a true classic launch, is just the bare hull and is in beautiful condition for its age, has been in my shed for 30 years waiting for attention, I’ll never get around to it , I only rescued it because I knew her history and wanted to see her preserved, she had a 5 HP Frisco Standard in her for years, shes only 6 ft beam, they didn’t start building them with 8ft beam until the twin cyl 8 hp Friscos came out in the 1920’s.
The Baldicks said that they flush decked her for gropher fishing and that when they were steaming around Dieffenbach Point in a strong southerly she would roll over that far that your shoulders would be in the water.!
What I could do is send you the story of her builder Ernest Berg who  was a real character, was bankrupted 3 times but kept reinventing himself, a real conman but he built beautiful boats, back at the turn of the century, 3 of them left that I know of.
That’s enough for now, Keep up your good work mate.
PART TWO
Kia Ora Alan,
My pleasure, always interesting to look at a series of photos taken of a wooden boat that shows how their superstructures  were changed to suit their roles and how their engines got bigger and bigger with advances in technology.
My old waka “Tutanekai originally had an 18 hp twin cyl Regal, that was replaced by a 40 hp 4 cyl sterling, then a 60hp, 6 cyl Hercules, a 110 hp  471 GM during the war, currently has a 120 hp GM and have a 6 cyl 340 hp Yanma  in the shed to replace the GM, ( but it refuses to die.)
My apologies, but I don’t know (or don’t remember )  what the original engines were in the Primadonna,  most of the early launches back in the 1920’s had 5 hp single cylinder Frisco standards when they wore out were replaced by 2 cylinder 8 hp Friscos, they were replaced in the 1940’s with car engines then in the 1950s with truck or tractor diesel engines like 4 cyl Fords or GM’s , (lucky ones had Gardners ! )
When Alf Baldick finished whaling he used the Primmadonna as a farm boat and for transport to and from town, there were no roads in the Sounds.
He sold to a guy McManaway who was a gropher fisherman, he did away with the rear wheel house to give him more deck space and fish hold, he built a pilot house over rear of front cabin. He sold to Rex Baldick, Alfs nephew, he was farming in East Bay and spent a lot of time hunting, you would often see her at the Picton wharf with stern deck covered with carcasses of pigs and deer.
Rex sold to Ken MacArther who fished her out of the Wairau Bar, she caught fire on him, he took the 4 cyl Ford out that Rex had put in and replaced with a three cylinder Lister.
That was the end of her commercial fishing era, she had several owners and more changes to her superstructure, they replaced the rear wheelhouse, when I had it she had a coal scuttle that stuck up above the cabin top so you didn’t have to duck , getting in and out of the cabin. Before Ian Baldick bought her back into family ownership he threw the Lister out and put a reconditioned 4 cly Ford back in her, cut the coal scuttle off and replaced with a sliding hatch, put a new S/S shaft in her and did a great job of tidying her up. When he retired he put a line hauler on her for gropher fishing and spent a lot of time out fishing and deer shooting, when he past on she was sold but a couple of owners latter his son in law bought her back again for running the whanau to and fro to their bach.
Sad that she has been sold out of the Sounds, but who knows some day she may find her way home, it has happened before !
Nga Mihi,
Pete.
Woody Classics Weekend #5 Riverhead
RSVP waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Royal Falcon Restoration – Update June 2020

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Royal Falcon Restoration Update June 2020

I had a reason to be pointing the car towards what used to be called ‘Nappy Valley’ (Pakuranga) so decided to call into the Panmure River boat shed where Steve & Colette Pople are having the 38’, 1934 Cox & Filmer built bridge-decker – Royal Falcon restored, ‘having’ isn’t the best word because both are actively involved in the project.
As you will see in the above photo gallery, the team are working at an impressive pace. The Commer TS3 engine is back in and looking very shinny. Very impressed to see the team re-purposing as much timber as possible – we like that 🙂
While there I dropped off an age appropriate search light that I had promised Steve, it didn’t suit Raindance so – ‘spread the love’. Thank you Jason Prew who gifted it to me originally 🙂
You can read / view Royal Falocn’s past at the link below + earlier project photos
Below is a video walk by/thru that I did. Have to say it is so cool to see a real, working, waterfront boat shed. Anyone remember something called ‘Heritage Landing’ aka the Vos Shed………….

Aloha Kai

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ALOHA KAI

Today’s woody is the game boat Aloha Kai, seen above in a 1968 photo from Russell in the Bay of Islands.
On Lew Redwood’s fb, Charlie Baker commented that at the time she was owned by John Chibnell and that she was the fastest boat in the bay thanks to a Chev 454 V8 (petrol) engine. Her top speed was 35 knots, a step up from the norm of around 8.5 knots from the rest of the game fleet.
Douglas Burnage also commented that she may have been owned in 1980’s by Vic Otto and operated out of Houhora as a long-liner.
Can anyone tells us more about Aloha Kai eg design / builder and provide an update on what became of her?
Update 24-05-2020 Photo below of Aloha Kai in Raio Creek Houhora – January 1994. Sent in by Craig Ogle.
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Tradition

Tradition @ Mahurangi Regatta 2016

Tradition at the Mahurangi Regatta 2017

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The 'Bar'

The Bar

TRADITION

The 44’ launch Tradition slips comfortably into the woody ’Spirit of Tradition’ (excuse the pun) category – designed by Bo Birdsail and built by Geoff Bagnall, she was launched in 1990 for Rhys & Dick Boyd. Today’s WW story is a first for WW in that the format is an interview by Keith Busch (a former owner) with Rhys and Dick. Make yourself a cup of something and find a comfortable chair – its a cracker read and really showcases what a talented boat builder Geoff Bagnall is. Special thanks to Keith for pulling this story together – simply brilliant.  Full specs and ownership summary on the vessel at the end.

Keith : What do ‘Tradition’ and the Auckland pilot boat – Akarana, (designed by A. J. Collings & built by W. G. Lowe in 1960) have in common?*

Dick : I went into the fishing industry in the seventies. By 1985 I had a quota of my own and a purpose built long-liner – Kerama. Then the new owners of the company I worked for (Polar Seafood Co.) wanted me to come ashore and be fleet manager for all their trawlers.

Rhys : Anyway, one day he had just unloaded a catch and we were on our way home to our place near the Tamaki Bridge and he told me just how much he’d got per kilo for the fish he’d landed, and it was astronomical! Then he slipped in that he wanted to build a launch.

 Keith : So what year was this?

Dick : I would say it was 1985.

Rhys: So I said, ‘We’re not building a launch!’, and he said, ‘But I’ve got everything for it’, and I said,  ‘I don’t care, we’re going to buy another fishing boat, with prices like that we’re going to be loaded!’ So next day I go to work and on the way home I thought, ‘Oh that was a bit mean’. So he comes home that night and I said, ‘We need to have a talk’, and he said, ‘I’m going first. I’m building a launch!’, and I said, ‘I was just going to say that!’ So that was the beginning, it was like, ‘Oh I can’t do that to him, he wants it too much’. So we didn’t get rich, but we did get Tradition.

Keith : So where did you start, did you go for a builder or a designer first?

Dick : Well the designer was Bo Birdsall. I went to see John Lidgard first and I asked him to draw me a boat, but after a few sketches I wasn’t getting what I wanted. Then somebody, oh Roy Rimmer, said to me try Birdsall. So we met with Bo and he drew it up. We were real happy with his hull, it was great. But I still had a few questions about his topsides. Anyway, when we got Geoff onboard we thought we could start from Bo’s drawings and go from there, so that was the beginning of it. Bo was a real nice guy and extremely clever. He was good to work with.

Keith : So you were happy with the hull, how’d you end up with that beautiful topside?

Dick : Well what happened was, Bo drew it up and he didn’t include the sedan roof on the fore deck, so it was just the main cabin sitting on the deck. But when Geoff was building the boat the radius that had to go into the forward area to give head room, well it just didn’t work. Anyway Geoff came up with the idea to put a sedan roof on the forward deck and just that small addition balanced out the main cabin nicely. It’s one of those things with a good builder, he just put up some false frames, then let us have a look at it and it worked. He’s got a great eye for those things you know, always looking as he goes.

Rhys : We didn’t get a drawing of it and say, ‘Yes that all works’. All of us looked at her as we went.

Dick : Of course Geoff would have put a little more sheer on it, because that’s just Geoff, but I liked Bo’s idea of the hull. It’s very hard during a build, a lot of the time you don’t know what you’re going to end up with. We had ladders all over the show. You’d be climbing up and down and looking along the boat and trying to imagine what it was going to look like in the water. Later we were down the side of Waiheke and this guy passes and yells out ‘Geez someone made a great job of that!’, so I think it in the end she works.

Keith : So going back a bit, how did you get Geoff Bagnall as your boat builder?

Dick : Well okay, first we started talking with Brin Wilson’s boys Richard and Bob Wilson, because Bo’s wife was related to the Wilson’s. Bo said ‘it would be good if you got the Wilson’s to build it. I’d had nothing to do with them so I got a price from them and I though ‘Well we’ve struck a bit of a wall here!’. So I talked to Bo and he said ‘Okay, then try young Bagnall’. So I contacted him and he was interested at a price we could manage and we went from there.

Keith : ‘Young’ Bagnall! He’s just retired! How old was Geoff at this time?

Dick : Just around forty or something about that, because he had built – Nazareth and the yacht. He’d already built several boats, oh and he’d built the one that hit the bricks going over to Barrier (Onetunga?), oh and Katoa. He would have built about 8 or 9 boats by then and he designed some as well, I think he designed Katoa. His boats are a little hard edged to my eye. More ‘solid’ compared to Bo’s lines I think.

Keith : So where was she built then. Was Geoff off on his own?

Dick :  When he did Tradition he built it in the old Harbour Board timber mill. The Harbour Board had just been privatised and they weren’t using their mill building at Westhaven, so Jack Fagan organised for us to use an area in the mill shed. That was real handy because all the woodworking equipment was in there so we could use it to deal with the timbers. All her timber work was done there in that mill building, except we sent the kauri out to a joker who did timber dressing in Rosedale Road and he did the whole lot. So it went out in flitches and it came back in nice dressed planks ready to go on the boat. The planks for the hull are inch and three-quarter by inch and a quarter heart kauri.

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Work on Tradition commences in the Auckland Harbour Board Timber Mill building 1989

Keith : So where did the wood come from?

Dick : It came from Noel Mitchell who was the foreman at the Ports of Auckland slipway. When Akarana*, which was Auckland’s biggest pilot boat in those days, was being built, Noel had decided that a pilot boat could get smashed up real easy, so he bought enough kauri and teak for extensive repairs and put that aside to repair Akarana if she got crunched. There was talk of them selling this timber for houses but Noel said ‘No, it’s for boat building so we’re selling it for that. So that’s where we got the timber. We got all her heart kauri and the teak there.

Keith : So where exactly was the Harbour Board timber mill located?

Dick : Well, to the best of my memory, it was just past where ‘Sailors Corner’ is nowadays. On the left hand side of the road, well that was all Harbour Board land. Its where McMullen and Wing’s haul-out is now. The Harbour Board had three or four slipways there and they used to do all the work for us on the trawlers. They were close by so the company could keep the trawler crews employed by doing all the cleaning and paint-work and chip rust off the boats instead of spending all their time in the pub. So I knew Noel and it worked out pretty well.

Keith : So you got hold of Geoff and he was keen to take it on?

Dick : Oh yes. He had this old mate called Bert who used to sweep the floor and mix the glue and make the tea. Of course Bert has passed away now but he was a hell of a nice old guy and he worked on her as well.

Keith : Who else was involved in the build?

Dick : The wiring was Peter Galley, the painting was Mark Binney, plumbing was Alan Kemp, who was a Harbour Board guy. There was a lot of input from the slipway workers off and on and in their own time. Of course, I supplied them with fish non-stop so it was give and take, a bit of barter. The engineering was, oh well we did most of that stuff ourselves.

Keith : And the Ford engine was from Lees?

Dick : No, the engine was from Don Bernand,  Don is Mr Ford, he’s brilliant. I think we bought the engine in Tradition from Newlove in Whangarei and Don did the marinisation. He served his time with the Lane Motorboat Co. on the Tamaki River and when Lees got out of Ford he bought everything off them, all the patterns, moulds, that sort of stuff and set himself up at home. Don bought the new engine for me. It has a Newage Coventry 2:1 gearbox and the ‘get-home’ kit in it. At the time it was hard to find the gearbox we wanted but Don eventually found it and we fitted it. I can’t think who did the hydraulics, but it was all fitted by us.

Tradition Engine Room

Keith : So you gathered all her bits and pieces together. When did the build start?

Dick : It took me 6 years to put everything together before I got to the point where I could say, okay I’ve got enough to go and do it. During that time I had all the timber stored at home. At my son’s 21st we had the filches on sawhorses under the marquee so all the guests were sitting around on the kauri filches. They hung around for years reminding me to keep collecting stuff. The brass portholes in the cabin doors come from an old fish ‘n chip shop in Howick, while the ship’s bell is from the ill-fated ferro fishing vessel the – Trident.

Rhys : We’ll he’d been collecting things for a long time. He had some things ready to go. He’d probably told me he’d bought stuff for a boat but I hadn’t listened or realised it was enough to build a complete boat.

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Boat builder Geoff Bagnall begins work, July 1989

Dick : The photo above is the laying out of the frames internally. You’ve got them all standing up there. That’s Geoff in his younger days. Geez he looks different there doesn’t he!

Keith : So the date on that photo is July 26th 1989, is that about the date she was started?

Dick : Would’ve been pretty close to it. Maybe a month before perhaps.

Rhys : Lucky the cameras had the dates on them in those days.

Keith : So tell us about all the effort of the construction.

Dick : Well we could lay 8 planks per day. So all the frames were stood up and we had the steam box ready for the planks there at the mill.

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Original owner Dick Boyd sanding plugs on the hull, 1989

Keith : So you were coming down each day and helping Geoff?

Dick : I used to come in at night after work and do all the plugging. So Bert, cuppa tea maker and floor sweeper, he used to help Geoff during the day. They used to put the timber in the steamer and the following morning they’d come in and put those 8 planks up and then put another 8 in the steam box. So it was pretty slow going. I’d come in after work and do the plugs. But they were always in front of me because you couldn’t work on the planks that they had just put up that day because you’re driving the plugs in, so I was always a bit behind them plugging and sanding.

Rhys : Don’t forget you had to make all those plugs yourself too.

Keith : So how many were there? Did you count?

Rhys : He wouldn’t be brave enough to count, that would have been tear-jerking.

Dick : No, it was slow work. But the reason I plugged it was that sometimes you wake-up in the morning and you’re able to see every bit of bog that’s gone into a boat and you shouldn’t be able to see that with proper plugging.

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Geoff Bagnall and assistant Bert working on the hull, 1989

Dick : Roy Rimmer used to pop in to make sure we were doing everything right. There was a lot of interest in the boat, because it was very handy to everybody in the harbour area.

Rhys : A lot of people would pop in after work and see how we were getting on.

Keith : So why did you choose to build her in wood?

Dick : Well you’re right, wooden boats were not being built at the beginning of the 90’s and a lot of people said ‘What are you bloody well building a launch that big in wood for?’ But, you know, it was what we both wanted. If I go back to the days of the old ‘Golden Kiwi’ tickets, my nom-de-plume was always 44’x14’, that’s because I was determined I was going to build a wooden launch that was 44’ long with a beam of 14’. Ha ha, I never won the Golden Kiwi did I! But even way back then I was thinking of her, I suppose it was my dream. And I’d always said I’d love a boat with proper teak coamings, teak decks and a hull of kauri.

Rhys : With a wife to varnish and look after it!

Dick : Yeah, I was lucky I had one of those!

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Geoff Bagnall turns the hull, September 1989

Keith : What were some of the comments you got when you were building her.

Dick : Well it was the materials of the build that attracted people. It’s a kauri strip planked boat, but the availability of kauri was getting very tight, even in those days. You just couldn’t go out and buy it. If you did happen to find some stacked up somewhere, it was really expensive. But because we knew the blokes at the Harbour Board and had feed them a lot of fish over the years, we got lucky with the source of the kauri we used. They gave it to us at a reasonable cost and there was also teak there that was meant to repair the old pilot boats, but they were being retired and the new ones were steel.  Colin Clare might know how old the wood itself was. I can’t honestly say, but it was already old when we bought it. I think it was milled on Great Barrier. Anyway, they were happy to see it go to build a boat and not end up in a kitchen cupboard.

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‘Bagnall’s work of art’.  Dick’s son Adam finishing the inside of the hull, October 1989

When I took Geoff in to have a look at the timber, there were stacks and stacks of 3’’x 2’’ kauri, but the sap wood was all full of borer. So we set those bits aside and all the stuff we bought were filches of heart kauri. The teak there was all 3’’, so Geoff split them and I think the cabin is inch and three-eights. Anyway, there’s a lot of teak in her topsides and a hell of a lot of kauri in the hull! What else? Well, there’s some totara in the keel, that came from the Salvation Army place down at Rotoroa Island. The guy who ran the ‘Kahino’ was a mate of Geoff’s and he provided that for us. Most of the keel and the engine bearers are Australian brushbox which is quite a hard, heavy, red coloured wood, but you have to watch it because it will get worm, that’s why it’s glassed over.

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Topsides taking shape, March 1990

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Dick Boyd checking proportions.

Keith : So how long was the build time.

Dick : Well what did we say, from mid1989 and it was launched at the end of 1990.

Keith : So all your mates and friends came and gave you a hand at some stage?

Rhys : Only Mary Smith came to help, the others came to drink! But Jack Fagan did some work on it, he was good.

Dick : It’s amazing how hard helpers are to find. The minute you mention sandpaper, they’re off, outta here! But Jack was one of the supporters of the whole project, he helped make things happen sometimes when we hit a wall.

Rhys : By the time we had the launching we were so exhausted from months and months of work we didn’t want her! We launched it and then everybody got so full of wine and drink that the next morning we had a shocking hang-over. We dragged ourselves out of bed and went round for breakfast at Westhaven and I said to Tich, ‘Do you want the boat’ and he said ‘Na’. Of course we didn’t really mean that, but oh it had just been such a big job and she wasn’t finished by a long shot. We didn’t have a stove or a fridge. We didn’t have squabs. We had a toilet and a shower, that was it! To top it all off we’d run out of money!

Dick : We had to follow Chris and Mary Smith around, because they had a launch called ‘Hukarere’ and they had a nice cooker onboard, so we used to follow them.

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‘Looking for the Smiths’ – maiden voyage to Rangitoto, November 1990. Dick and Rhys Boyd on the flybridge.

Rhys : They also had a fridge so we kept our cold stuff in there.

Dick : Paul Nolan had a big Salthouse 53’ ‘Blitzen’ and he had a whole lot of squabs because he was replacing his so I said ‘don’t throw them out, we’ll be round to pick them up’.

Rhys : So we slept on those squabs and wherever Chris and Mary were, we were there. We couldn’t even make a cup of coffee! So they spent their time trying to lose us and we spent our time trying to find them. ‘Would you two like to come over?’ they would say, and we’d already be in the dingy heading towards them. And then after a while it was like, ‘gosh, can we even afford to finish her?’.

Dick : Anyway, over a few years we slowly pieced the rest of her together.

Rhys : Yes, there was still a lot to do. All the sanding inside is mine, every single inch!! You know I was a kindergarten teacher, so every school holidays, for two weeks in May and three weeks in August, and most weekends, we were on the boat doing something. I’d row out, hop on the boat outside our place in the Tamaki River and I’d get going on something. Lots of sanding, lots of varnishing.

Keith : So where did you take her on the first trips.

Dick : Well I liked the bottom end of Waiheke and over at Coromandel, Te Kuma.

Rhys : And we never managed to get to the Bay of Islands because we were working too much.

Dick : Also Waiheke. Oneroa was always popular because the Smiths were there. They still tell us when Tradition is in the bay. We have our spies! And she’s a notable boat anywhere you go, people respond to her and row over to have a yarn. Yeah, Geoff did a great job on her. One of his best.

Rhys & Dick Boyd on Tradition

Original owners – Dick & Rhys Boyd, Mahurangi Regatta, January 2017.

Owners of M.V. Tradition since Dick and Rhys Boyd 

1990-1996 > Dick and Rhys Boyd  – Moored in Tamaki River

1996-?        > Dave ? [clue – owned a pub in Mangere?]

19?? – 1998  > ?? Two guys bought it from Dave via a broker [information from Rod Middleton (Sailors Corner) They wished to take her south by truck to Mana Marina but after talking with Geoff they sailed her down the coast.

1998-2006 > Sold to Peter and Jenny Standish from Wellington and berthed at Mana. Cruised in the Marlborough Sounds.

2006-2007 > Sold to a Picton local. Moved to Waikawa Marina, Picton

2007-2011 > Sold back to Peter and Jenny Standish. Berthed in Waikawa Marina. Had a major refit at Frankins Boat Yard, Waikawa in 2009.

• Varnish stripped inside and two pot urethane used.

• New navigation electronics, TVs, sound system, stove, leather upholstery, carpets, covers and bow thrusters added.

• Bunks in forward V-berth removed, double bed built in.

2011-2019 > Sold to Keith Busch & Wiesje Geldof of Wellington. 3 years berthed at Waikawa Marina. Vessel trucked north to Tauranga from Mana Marina 2013. 3 years berthed at Bridge Marina, Tauranga. Hutchinson’s Boat Yard, Tauranga work :

• Stripped outside varnish and replaced with 16 coats of ‘All-wood’ urethane

• New teak plank deck installed. Boot topping strip repainted in light green.

• Fly-bridge helm station repainted. Holding tank and generator added.

3 years berthed at Hobsonville Marina, Auckland

Accepted into Classic Yacht Association in 2016 as ‘modern classic’.

2020 > Sold to Chris and Rae Collins of the RNZYS

Lower Helm Station

Lower helm station

'Tradition'. BOI 2016

Bay of Islands 2014

Specifications of M.V. Tradition

Type : Saloon Launch

Designer : Bowden ‘Bo’ Birdsall

Builder :Geoff Bagnall, built at Auckland Harbour Board mill building, Westhaven

Launched : November 1990

Commissioned : Dick and Rhys Boyd of Tamaki, Auckland

Dimensions : LOA 44 feet, beam 14’ 3”, draft 4’6”, displacement 11.5 t

Engine : 1990 Ford 145hp ‘Marko’, cruises at 9 kts, max speed 11kts

Gearbox : Newage Coventry 2:1 gearbox

Construction : Kauri planked hull (inch and three-quarter by one inch, glassed-over), strip-teak deck, teak topsides, white hull with light green boot-topping, polished wooden topsides, white fly-deck.

Mechanical : Side-Power bow thrusters, Pugaro diesel generator, anchor winch

Electrical : 12V and 240V systems, auto-helm, radar, Garmin gps chart plotter, TV, stereo system, VHF (x2), 3 x house batteries, 2x start batteries, inverter

Accommodation : 2 cabins, Master (double) and Guest (2 single)

Galley : 4 burner gas stove, microwave, gas hot water system, fridge, freezer

Tanks : Diesel – 1 x 650 litres; water 2x 350 litres (700 litres) both stainless steel. Black water holding tank 300 litres in welded plastic

NOTE: Boat builder Geoff Bagnall is not retired, just no longer has the shed in Milford Creek.

 

 

SS Duke of Marlborough

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SS DUKE of MARLBOROUGH

I recently stumbled across the above photo of the steam ship – Duke of Marlborough and knowing nothing about her put a call into Russell Ward aka Mr Steam. The man is never embarrassed to speak so – take it away Russell, WW is all yours…..

“Once, 30+ years ago, I built up a steamboat called “Gypsy”. So pull up a chair, warm yourselves by the fire and I’ll tell you a story which isn’t about “Gypsy” at all, it’s about the “James Torrey” which became the “Duke of Marlborough”.

But, through “Gypsy”, I met one Lloyd Lewis of Lake Tarawera. He was an ardent enthusiast for steamy things (who wouldn’t be – living on Lake Tarawera.) Lloyd had made a steamer up out of a hull I had sold him a year or so previously and really had the steamboat bug badly. As the late Pete Culler (he wrote a lot about boats and he was a wise man) said “It’s awful, don’t go near it or you are hooked.” And you can’t argue with facts like that, folks. Suffice to say Lloyd got steam enginitis in a big way.

He had Wellington naval architect Bruce Askew design a hull for a 36’ steam vessel following the style of the early 1900 steam boats The steel hull was built in 1987 by Gordon Clark and Brian Starrock in New Plymouth and shipped to Rotorua for Lloyd to complete. He did a fine aesthetic job. She was launched as “James Torrey” and he used her to take fishing tours on the lake. The lads appreciated the warmth from the boiler at times.

Lloyd built the engine – an English design by A.A. Leake and a dashed good looker it is -a traditional open compound, driving a 28” by 42” propeller giving a service speed of 6 knots. A piston valve is fitted to the high pressure cylinder and a balanced slide valve on the low pressure one. It has cross-head driven twin feed pumps and air pump. Exhaust is through a feed-water heater to a keel condenser. There you feel a lot better for knowing that.

But to sum up, working on salt water, you have to condense the exhaust steam or you run out of feedwater real quick. Besides, condensing gives you a useful addition to the power through the vacuum created which, in essence, sucks the piston while the steam pushes.

The steam is provided by a Kingdon type boiler (1900’s Simpson Strickland design) built by Langley Engineering in the U.K and, since you didn’t really want to know, It is a vertical fire-tube type, 34 inches high by 30 inches diameter over lagging, has 3.4 square feet of grate area and has 84 square feet of heating surface. She burns coal and there is nothing better.

Lloyd had quite job actually getting Ed Langley to dispatch the finished boiler although it had been long since paid for. Ed had had his delivery problems over the years…. Legend has it that, in frustration (remember communication was all letters and phone calls that had to be booked well ahead in those prehistoric times); Lloyd flew over to the UK and turned up at the works just ahead of the receiver. Seeing the likelihood of his investment coming to nothing, he took matters into his own hands and loaded the boiler up himself. Lloyd just wasn’t the sort of man to argue with and got his boiler. It is a very handsome job.

Anyway after a number of years, Lloyd tired of his steamboat and Roger Frazer took her to Picton. He renamed her “Duke of Marlborough” and did a lot of restoration which is a credit to him. He has been taking passengers out of Picton for some time. I’m sure the passengers appreciate the boiler’s warmth even more that the Lake Tarawera types.”

I understand she may be for sale………

WoodenBoat Magazine Interview #3 

This week WB editor Matt Murphy interviews Harold Burnham in a live discussion of how, for nearly three decades, he has been instrumental in revitalizing the shipbuilding and maritime culture of his region by designing, building, and rehabilitating traditional vessels for cultural tourism. Harold is an 11th-generation shipwright, and has, at various times, also been a sawyer, mariner, model maker, and sail maker.

Seriously Cool Steam Boat

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Seriously Cool Steam Boat

The above steam boat, owned by Hamilton engineer, Chris Cooper recently popped up on a fb post of Geoff Lewis’s.
All I know, but I can hear Russell Ward duping as you read this, is that Chris rebuilt the boat from a wreck. It has a tripe-expansion engine, in my ignorance I hope it is coal or wood fired and not diesel – I would love this as a retirement boat on a lake…………..
Hopefully we will find out more about her.
AND WOODYS WE CAN GO BOATING AGAIN – NO PRIZE FOR GUESSING WHAT I WILL BE DOING THIS AFTERNOON
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HDML Manga > Haimoana

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HDML MANGA > HAIMOANA

In the interests of saving you from getting a sore neck from shaking your head – this boat ended up with a beehive restoration i.e. was put on the bonfire.

The HDML Manga was built by Madden & Lewis in Sausalito, California, USA during WWII and was sold by the NZ Navy in 1980. Her first owner post the Navy was Steve Hansen of Herne Bay, Auckland. When Hansen purchased her she had no engines. During his period of ownership she was kept on the outer side of the Auckland’s Viaduct Basin.
Hansen sold her to his friend Hans Van Duyn of Helensville in the early 1980’s, still with no engines. (Hansen also owned the HDML Black Watch).
Van Duyn stripped the coamings off her whilst she was at the Viaduct Basin and took her bare hull to Helensville on the West Coast, where they spent the next 2+ years rebuilding the vessel – including 16 single berths and 2 staterooms. In the mid 1980’s she was renamed Haimona after the owners late son.
The vessel was fitted with two Ruston Hornsby, 200hp diesel engines, with hydraulic gearboxes. Top speed was claimed to be 18 knots. The engines were ex the A.H.B. tug Manukau. Also fitted with a funnel & dry exhausts with silencers.
Van Duyn used her extensively, from the mid 1980s to c.1999. She was the largest pleasure boat in the Helensville Cruising Club fleet and was frequently mark boat and involved in many regattas and other club activities,  
She fell in to disuse around 1999 when Van Duyn sold his waters edge property, on the Kaipara Harbour. As there was nowhere else on the Kaipara that had a suitable facility to slip her, she deteriorated through lack of ability to maintain her and lack of use. Ultimately, she got  to the point, where her pumps were running 24/7 and despite attempts to provide her with better moorings, the end was near and they brought her ashore, stripped her engines out of her and saved what they could e.g. portholes and other useable fittings. In c.2006 they put a match to her.
Note: during this period Hans Van Duyn also owned HDML Kupara, which is now owned and restored Scott Perry, Whangarei. The story of Kupara has appeared on WW – link here   https://waitematawoodys.com/2018/10/04/hmnzs-kuparu-hdml/
Story assembled by Ken Ricketts with input from Steve Hansen, Rene Van Duyn and Bob Siegel. Edited extensively by Alan H.
Manga Navy Service ex Greg Philpott

HMNZS Manga (Q1185) was one of 16 Harbour Defence Motor Launches (HDML) to be delivered to the RNZN in 1943. She was commissioned on 6 April 1943 and joined the 124th. ML Flotilla at Auckland. She was used in anti-submarine patrols in the port approaches and the Hauraki Gulf northwards to Cape Brett. On 11 October 1945 she paid off in Auckland and was placed in reserve. In early 1946 she was converted for army use, fitted with a towing bitt and transferred ‘on loan’ to the Army. She was renamed Bombardier and used by the RNZ Artillery for target towing and general transport duties for over 10 years. In 1948 she was reclassified as a Seaward Defence Motor Launch (SDML) and renumbered P3567. In November 1959 she was transferred back to the RNZN. In 1960 she was commissioned as HMNZS Manga (call sign ZMBJ) and joined the fishery squadron where she served until 1967. After a refit she was assigned to Wellington RNZNVR until 1973, and then re-joined the fishery squadron briefly, returning to Wellington in 1974. In 1977 Manga was restricted to sheltered waters and returned to Auckland in 1977. During the period from 1977 to 1981 she was attached to HMNZS Ngapona. She was withdrawn from service and sold in 1982 to Takapuna Contractors Ltd., and was later sold again and transported to Helensville for rebuilding.

 

Great story tomorrow (Monday) – I’ll make good for today’s work-boat / military OTT story 🙂
Don’t Be Embarrassed If You Emailed Yesterday Asking For Chris McMullen’s Berthing Tips – 178 people did 🙂
Something For The Yachties – photo below sent in be Nathan Herbert – looking to ID to the two yachts seen here berthed at Whangarei.
Mystery Yachts Whangrei

A Gift From WoodenBoat Magazine

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YOUR OWN COPY OF WOODENBOAT MAGAZINE

In response to the COVID-19 worldwide pandemic, and to help ease your time while practicing social distancing, the publishers of WoodenBoat have very generously decided to make the digital edition of WoodenBoat No. 274 (May/June 2020) free for all to read and enjoy. Please share this digital edition with all friends and family you think might enjoy, or need, a fun distraction. With the forecast for long overdue rain for most of NZ later today – this is perfect timing for a lazy afternoon on the couch 🙂 Enjoy

Link Below

https://woodenboat.advanced-pub.com/Vizion5/viewer.aspx?shareKey=rOFucb

 

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The Restoration Of Melodeon

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The Restoration Of Melodeon

Now woodys if you know Dick Fisher you  will know that Dick likes BIG things – big classic boats, big projects, big (zoom zoom) cars. Chatting with Dick recently he informed me he had a project on the go, his words “something to keep me out of trouble” so of course I said ’send me some details – givens Dicks other two boats – Akarana, the 60’ 1960 AJ Collings designed and built by WG Lowe, ex Auckland Harbour Board pilot boat and Hamal, the 1975 purpose built exploration ship – I suspected the project would be a doozy. Photos of Akarana & Hamal below.
Dick and Colleen have a stunning track record of converting ex work boats into the most amazing classic cruisers so WW looks forward to following this project, we will be giving Dick a friendly nudge for updates.
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I’ll let Dick tell us what he is up to, remember click in photos to enlarge 😉

 
“The story so far goes a bit like this……
We purchased Melodeon from Greg Hayes in April 2018. Greg had owned & fished with her for the past 25 years. 
One of the photos above shows her at her semi-permanent berth at the Whangarei Town Basin prior to our buying her.
After the successful negotiation of price with Greg, who had expressed the wish for Melodeon to only be purchased by someone prepared to restore her.
We lifted her out at Dockland 5 in Whangarei, her estimated weight at this point was in excess of 50 ton. We removed as much equipment as were able which included 9 ton of lead balast. This would explain why when blasting the paint from the hull we uncovered seven (7) waterlines this made her draft aft at 7 ft. 
 
With the assistance of Boat Haulage Ltd we moved her to our workshop at Kamo & then commenced dismantling decks, bulwarks, wheelhouse & removed the engine & fuel tanks etc. She was then high pressure water blasted & garnet blasted all of the paint off inside & out.  She was then moved inside the same shed where Akarana had been for 5 years during her restoration.
 
The hull was copper fastened of 3 skin construction.. unfortunately the 2 inch Kauri decks were iron fastened & unable to be saved.
 
To date we have treated with preservatives the inside of the hull & currently has a holding undercoat.
 
The last few month I have been focused  on restoring the T8 Kelvin engine which was in reasonable condition. Main items needing replacing were a set of 8 exhaust valves , a complete gasket set plus other small items. I was able to purchase these from  Kelvin Diesels in Glasgow, a subsidiary of British Polar Engines. We have found this company & their staff most helpful in procuring parts. The engine is now complete & running very nicely. 
 
Up to date the work has been carried out mostly by myself & my son Richard when he had time. The engineering side of the restoration we can manage ourselves.  We now realise we need a skilled boat builder to assist us with the woodworking aspect.
It is our intention not to alter the overall design, with the exception being the wheelhouse which needs to be a little bigger.  
 
We are fortunate in that Greg Hayes has passed on to me the Marine Dept files dating back to October 1934.
Some salient points for you:
Plans, specs & building was carried out for Melodeon by Chas Bailey & Son in Auckland.
Original engine was a German Deutz/110BHP / 2 cycle diesel/ @ 450RPM this was replaced by the current T8 Kelvin.
Propeller:  4 blades /59 inch dia x 48 inch pitch – 3.3 to 1 reduction
Dimensions: Overall 57ft Beam 15ft6in draft 7ft
The existing T8 Kelvin was installed new in 1960 & the estimate from info we have, is that she has run well in excess of 100,000 hours.
Melodeon fished using different methods all around NZ, during the 1939/45 war the US Navy commandeered her for service in the Pacific.
  
This is an ongoing project for me in my dotage & its keeping me out of trouble.. in fact it’s a pretty big job….as the TV Ad goes…”
 
A Heads Up
Two cool things you may have overlooked in the last week
1. Do check out the link that Hylton Edmonds posted in the WW comments section. Its to a National Film Unit movie that features the then police launch Lady Shirley going about its duties on the Waitemata Harbour – fast forward to the 5:10 mark to catch the start, its a great watch and lots of our woodys make appearances – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8mlqfwtybXE
2. Put your hand in your pocket and spend NZ$5 to subscribe for two months to the very informative and entertaining Vblog – OFF CENTER HARBOR. The guys at OCH have offered up this deal to WW readers so you can get your classic boating fix during the lockdown – details here  OCH $5 Deal
Akarana (L) – Hamal (R)

Manunui

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MANUNUI

Todays’ story on Manunui comes to us from the ‘desk’ of Paul Drake – as always, well written so I’ll pass over to Paul.

 “Arriving at Taupo for our annual holiday one January in the late 1950’s, my brothers and I were intrigued to see a very unusual looking new commercial boat on the scene.   Before we knew her name, we kids called her ‘The Ugly Boat’.  She turned out to have a proper name – MANUNUI – after the saw milling town just out of Taumarunui.   It was there that she was built by the manager of said sawmill, Basil Maude.

Basil’s hobby was building boats, but he rarely got more than about three-quarters of the way through before losing interest.  MANUNUI was the exception.  He wished to see how big a boat he could build out of plywood.  He had the plywood made at his mill from selected timber.   Her bottom had two sheets of ply each twenty feet long , six feet wide, and one and a quarter inches thick. She measured 36 feet by 12 feet.

She had to be chunky and strong because Basil had two Allison Kittyhawk 12-cylinder aeroplane engines which he wanted to fit.   He designed and built the double gearbox himself.  It measured eight feet by three feet by two feet deep.   At the last minute the plan changed and the two gallons per minute Allisons were wisely ditched in favour of Ford V8s. But the gear box remained – larger than the two engines.   This most fascinating gearbox was mounted forward of the engines with the propeller shafts running back under the engines.   Chains were involved, and each propeller was operated independently of the other in the normal way.  MANUNUI was the first diesel powered launch on the lake (so it is said) and also the first commercial plywood boat to operate on the lake.

In the good old days when fishermen would club together and charter a launch for five day expeditions to Taupo’s Western Bay, MANUNUI was a very successful and busy charter launch under her very capable skipper Ron Houghton.

The original canvas arrangement over the aft end was eventually replaced with the rather functional effort shown in the second photo. In about 1970 a whole new cabin appeared.   Shortly afterwards MANUNUI was sold to New Plymouth.   I wonder if she survives?   Somehow I doubt it.

Much of this information is contained in ’Boats of Taupo’ by Charles Cox.

 

Taranui (Gailene > Masquerade > Taranui) 

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TARANUI (Gaylene > Masquerade > Taranui) 
 
Today’s woody story comes to us via the collective input of many people – Harold Kidd, Grant Faber, Barry and Christine Johnston, Grant Richards – under the guiding hand of Ken Ricketts and edited (a lot) by Alan H.
Some basic facts – 
Taranui is 30’ in length with a beam of 9’ 7”. 
She was built in 1948 as an internally ballasted 350 sq. ft. sail area Bermudan ketch (D28). There is speculation that Taranui was built either on the Hobsonville Air Force Base, or nearby, of kauri.
Her current owner is Grant Richards, who supplied all the above photos, and she is kept at Gulf Harbour marina.
 
Her provenance (with a few holes) goes like this – 
 
She was built by G Neville in 1948, her first registered  owner is D.H. McMillan of Ellerslie, Auckland – she was kept at St Heliers Bay.
Her second registered (15-09-1951) owner was W. (Bill?) Ridley of Pakuranga who kept her at Panmure.
She passed to D Wintle in 1961 & then Ron Faber on 13-10-67.
Grant Faber (son of Ron) has commented that when she was owned by Don Wintle, she was kept at Northcote Point, where she was moored when Faber Snr. bought her. Faber Snr. continued to keep off Northcote but later secured a mooring for her in Westhaven. 
By the 1960’s one mast had been removed and later both masts & rigging were removed by the owner from whom Barry Johnston bought her off. That owner still had them & offered them to Johnston, but he declined, as it was his intention to retain her in launch mode. Barry Johnston made her present mast during her major 1996 -2000 refit.
Johnston bought her off a private advertisement in trademe in the 1990’s and cannot recall who from. He owned her for about 15 years and kept her at Westhaven.
When Johnston bought her, she was called Gaylene (changed by an unknown previous owner) and in a very sad state, with lots of rot in the coamings and decks, and other much deferred maintenance, which he spent the next 4 years getting her up to pristine condition.The work all being done, on a family member’s private slip, in the Whau River. In view of all the work he undertook, Johnson changed her name to Masquerade.
One day when Johnston was on a cruise, Grant Faber rowed over to Masquerade and asked Johnston if he could have a look aboard, as he believed his father Commander Ron Faber RNZVR OBE VRD, may have owned her in the period c.1964 -79. After an inspection, he confirmed it was indeed his father’s old boat. After being informed that her original name was Taranui, during her 4 year re-fit, Johnston changed her name back to her original name, which she still has today.
According to the APYMBA records (ex Harold Kidd) – her original engine was a 28 hp petrol engine, with a 17 x 10, 3 blade prop. 
Grant Faber has commented that when his father bought her, she had a marine converted, 6 cyl. petrol Chev car engine, most probably her original engine, this engine gave a lot of trouble so Faber Snr. replaced it with a brand new, 6 cyl Holden petrol car engine.
By the time  she arrived in the hands of Johnston, she had acquired an old 4 cyl. slanting Ford diesel c.60hp, which during his 4 year refurbish, he replaced with a Moon Engines converted Isuzu 4 cyl. diesel c.60hp – which she still has today.
 
Recently, Grant Faber sent Ken Ricketts the note below:
 “Of nautical interest, the ensign staff shown in one of the photos, and the ensign, was passed to Dad, from my grandfather (Roy Drummond). It came from his launch Te Whara. He purchased it and fitted it to Te Whara in 1921 specifically for the visit of the Governor General visiting Whangarei in his ship Tutanikai. The launches of the day formed a guard of honour in the harbour. This ensign which is of real bunting made by Le Roy’s (the noted marine canvas makers) flew on Te Whara until Pa sold her, then on Taranui, then on my launch Te Whara 11). It is currently framed and hanging in my library showing remarkably little wear for an ensign coming up to 100 years old.” (edited)
 

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Marlin

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MARLIN
Woody Baden Pascoe recently sent in the above photos of Marlin seen here in the top photo at Whitianga c.1968 after being re-powered with a Caterpillar 320. 
At this time she was owned by Alf Clow (photos are courtesy of the Clow family). Alf bought Marlin off Rolly Smith who used her for game fishing. It is believed that prior to Rolly Smith she was owned by the Thames Harbour Board (who went bust).
 
The thinking is Marlin was build by Sam Ford, but there is know knowledge as to the launching date.
The second photo shows the new Cat 320 being lowered into Marlin, seems a rather large donk for the size of the boat. Thence the last photo of her flying along with Clow family on board.
The dinghy on the stern is from the hands of Howard Pascoe 🙂
Any woodys able to shed more light on the history of Marlin?
Input from Barbara Cooke – Rolly Smith was my uncle. He purchased Marlin during the early years of WW11 for the purpose of deep sea fishing but due to government fuel restrictions this wasn’t permitted. He and his young family farmed at Fletchers Bay, top of Coromandel. After the war they returned to Whitianga where Rolly operated Marlin for chartering and game fishing. In later years his son Bruce skippered Tuatea, another game fishing vessel in Whitianga.

 
Input from Ross Dawson – Papers Past, Thames Star 11.3.1926 tells us…”the Harbour Board’s new launch Marlin, was brought down from Auckland on Tuesday by the Dredgemaster,..Mr Roche” and in the same newspaper 31 March 1926 says…”…the launch passed government inspection on 10.3.1926….fit to ply with 8 passengers within extended river limits when not towing and with suitable canvas over the cockpit, or with 16 passengers within river limits proper….length 31.75 feet, breadth 8.25 feet, depth 2.87 feet, horsepower 30-35, crew 2. Registered as “Marlin” …” So, no builder but it shouldn’t be too hard to find a reference to the launching about Jan – Feb 1926, in the Auckland newspapers.

The Thames newspaper notes Marlin being in Whitianga in 1933.

 
Input from Harold Kidd – Can’t say I was confident about my last posting. Did some more digging and found that the Thames Harbour Board commissioned this launch from Sam Ford as a towboat, largely used for their dredge. She was unnamed but was completed in early 1926. Her dimensions were 31’6″ loa, 8’3″ beam and 2’6″ draft and 2.87tons displ. Things can’t have worked out as she was up for tender in August 1928 (again unnamed). The Secretary of the Harbour Board was later charged with embezzling a large sum from the Board and it folded shortly afterwards.
So the memories of all concerned were absolutely spot on!
Now we have to sort out what her name was before it was changed to MARLIN. Lovely boat! How nice it’s Sam Ford. 
I’m just in the process of preparing a series of Boating NZ articles on him. This boat just shows the breadth of his skills at much the same time as WHAKAARI and before his Art Deco cruisers.
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Telstar II – Vintage Speed Boat

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TELSTAR II – VINTAGE SPEED BOAT

I came across this ‘classic’ speed boat while trolling thru trademe. All the Masterton, Wairarapa based seller knows is that its 13’ in length.
Maybe the number on the hull, W.P. 45, will help us ID the boat.
Unless she held the NZ water speed record (which I highly doubt) the vendors asking price of $3.5k is a tad bullish.
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Erinor – A Peek Down Below

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ERINOR –  A Peek Down Below

Back in August 2014 Erinor made a brief appearance on WW, link below, lots of chat in the comments section.
What I can tell you is she was built by McGeady in 1953 for Gordon Collie and measures 33’6” x 10’8” x 3’6”. Powered by a Ford 120hp diesel.
In a previous life she was named – Lady Allyson.
Thanks to tme we get to have a peek down below.
Note To Self – Don’t Raft Alongside Trinidad – tends to lead to ‘short pants’ syndrome 🙂
RD+Trinny+Ngaio
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My Girl Mini Me

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MY GIRL MINI ME

The WW poster woody (for almost too long) just won’t go away.
On Monday, master model boat builder craftsman – Murray White called into The Slipway at Milford Marina to show My Girl’s owner Jason Prew the amazing model he has build of My Girl.
In the photos above thats Murray holding the model with My Girl in the background. That boat speeds more time out of the water than in, the perks of running a marine railway slip 🙂
Now woodys Murray just doesn’t build pieces of maritime art – his models are the real deal – this one is powered by an electric drill motor. Check out the video below to see her in action.
And just when you thought we have seen enough of My Girl – she is the cover boat on the 2020 edition of the CYA Classic Register 🙂   🙂     🙂
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Pavema + Do You Need An Engine?

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PAVEMA
Wow how cute is the above launch – I received an email from Neil Couch about an offer on an engine and the above two photos were included to show what the engine came out of. Of course I forgot about the engine and started admiring the boat. Back to engine later 🙂
 
What I can tell you is  –  the engine was installed in the early 1960’s when the then owner, a Mr Howden of Howden’s Jewellers of Hamilton re-furbished the boat. Neil is unsure as to the date his father-in-law purchased the boat but in approx.1980 the launch was scrapped on the father-in-laws property in Raglan. Neil believes the timbers had started to rot around the copper nails so it was eventually burned and the copper salvaged. The mast, rope ladder, and other minor parts were salvaged and stored and some are being incorporated into a new house build.
When the launch was scrapped, the engine, a Lees Marine Ford Consul 122e petrol engine with Paragon reverse and reduction gear box (photo below), was kept covered in the basement of the FIL’s house.
 
ALMOST FREE* Engine – *For a donation to Coastguard Raglan, Neil will hand the engine over to a good woody home. Collection is ex Raglan.
Contact Neil on nscouch@outlook.com 
 
Now back to the launch – anyone able to tell us more about her? She is very distinctive so someone must recall her.
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Woodys Waiheke BBQ & Pizza
RSVP TO: waitematawoodys@gmail.com
 
 
 

Zodie

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ZODIE
I have a request from Barrie Abel (MV Matira) in regards to a 19’ Shipbuilders launch that he purchased in 1995 from a long forgotten address in Otahuhu, Auckland.
Zodie is built with double diagonal kauri construction and when purchase was powered by a single cylinder Yanmar 8hp diesel. Barrie replaced the Yanmar with a 2 cyl. Ford which Barrie commented “bounced her along at 5 knots.
Barrie paid $1,500 for the boat and sold her 1997 to someone on Auckland’s North Shore.
Barrie is keen to learn if 23 years later she is still afloat and if so where ?
Update – 2 more photos from Barries  archives –  the Yanmar installed as purchased.
And the Ford installed under new engine box.
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Woodys Waiheke BBQ & Pizza

SS Alice SOS

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SS ALICE SOS

Yesterday I was contacted by Paul Drake in regard to the 26′ steam ship Alice. Alice has been sitting on trademe for over a year, crying out for a buying.
She appeared on WW back in Feb 2019 –  
 
Paul told me their local paper – the Taupo Times yesterday ran a feature on the boat and the owners desire to find a good home for her.
Alice is from the Kaipara and was completely and very thoroughly rebuilt by a partnership at Taupo in the 1990’s. Paul’s brother Michael was one of the partners. 

Paul commented that she is a remarkably successful boat of her type but needs TLC to get her going again.

Remarkably she carries no ballast – the heavy boiler sits in just the right place
longitudinally and sits her down to her marks perfectly.
She is beamier than many of her ilk which makes her a very good load carrier and very stable.
The owner is currently in Taupo (from UK) for not much more than a week, and intends to see her off before he leaves. So woodys – sounds like a bargain.
 
Would be a perfect candidate for a berth at the CYA’s Heritage Landing – but my spies tell me that venue may / will be lost to the waterfront redevelopments.
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A Woody Boating Day Of Two Halves 

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A Woody Boating Day Of Two Halves 
When I woke up yesterday, the first major decision was – “may I driving to Lake Rotoiti for the annual Classic & Wooden Boat Parade?” Almost didn’t, and I’m so glad I did – its such a cool event – brilliant location – cool boats – and the nicest people. Tomorrows WW story will be mammoth , so many boats to show you.
But today I thought I would share with you the two extremes of woody boating I enjoyed today.
At the end of the Parade I hitched a ride across the lake to the picnic venue aboard Gillian & Grant Cossey’s 1911, Collings & Bell built, 22’ launch – Elva. Grant does the shore based commentary for the parade, greatly appreciated by those that gather lakeside to view the parade. Grant also did the same gig for this years Mahurangi Regatta launch parade.
On my return trip from the picnic I was offered a ‘ride’ on Florence & Rod Prosser’s just rebuilt and launched speed boat – powered by a very souped up 1960’s small block Chev 327ci V8. Earlier in the day I went for a blast that saw us doing 45mph with the engine only at 1/2 throttle – the acceleration is startling, one minute your idling allow, next thing you are pinned to the seat. Sorry taking photos was impossible.
A couple of videos below (turn your sound up), to give you an idea of the sound and speed – no windscreen !
Back Monday with a snapshot of the Parade and picnic.
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Steam Launch Estral

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STEAM LAUNCH – ESTRAL
Marine engineer (retired) Bill Voisey sent in the above photo of his 21’ kauri steam launch – Estral. Estral has a a beam of 8’6” and draws 3’, and was originally built in Port Chalmers, for a Riverton Rocks farmer c.1940s. Bill understands this family (Jaimison) owned and used her until the 1990s.
Bill restored Estral and converted her to steam in the 1990 > 2000 period with the installation of a Stewart Turner 6A steam engine, and a Stirling  water tube boiler.
Video below of engine prior to clean up and painting
Video below showing back of engine showing boiler feed pump, and condensate pump.

The vessel is currently being re painted and tidied up to put it back in the water. Below is a summary of her set up:

Engine. Stewert Turner No 6a, 2 cyl compound,
Pumps engine driven condenser pump and boiler feed pump.
Keel condenser with return to hot well.
Prop 16″x 18 pitch. Hull speed 6 knots .
Stern tube oil filled with mechanical seals?
Thrust block fitted with forward and reverse thrust bearings.
12 volt alternator v belt driven from prop shaft.
Water tube boiler,pressure tested to 600lbs static pressure,stamped by inspector at 400lbs (not marine certified.)
oil fired automatic pressure controlled with Beckett oil burner fitted.
Water level kept by manual control via needle valve bypass.
Engine can be run to atmosphere
Tanning type boiler water treatment used.
Boiler always left with the total boiler system full of treated water filled from hot we’ll by hand boiler feed pump.

30-01-2020 Update – Russell Ward requested more details on the boiler. The below was supplied by Ben Voisey

“The Boiler design is of the type of water tube boilers common in the late 1890’s, taken from an article in book No 5 of the Modeltec magazines Sept 1988 page 27.
I adapted the design to suit the available space in the hull of Estral.
As you can see the design can be varied as to width, height and length with ease.
The headers at each end have only a 1.5 “ gap and the total of the boiler’s water capacity is under 30 litres .
Fuel type can be whatever suits the furnace that is designed, in this case oil fired.
These photos were taken when I did the last boiler clean.”

 
Hopefully I’ll See Some Of You Tomorrow At The Mahurangi Regatta – If You Don’t Make It, We Will Have Coverage In Tuesdays WW Story 🙂

 
WAITANGI DAY WOODY BEACH PICNIC – FEB 6 – Put A Circle In Your Diary, All Woodys Welcome. RSVP Below
Woody Waitangi Picnic

Maharatia (Anita Bay / Te Repo Repo Relaunched

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MAHARATIA RELAUNCHED
 
Last week in the WW inbox up popped a note from Troy and Dave Searle the owners of the 1947 Roy Lidgard built – Maharatia, the subject line said “Maharatia (Anita Bay) Update”. Well woodys that was an understatement, I can report that Maharatia has been relaunched 🙂
Firstly excuse me while I rewind – back in August 2015 Paul Drake sent me a single b/w photo (c.1960’s) of a rather large woody on the back of a truck in Taupo. Paul commented that the launch was Te Repo Repo as she was named while operating commercially on the lake.
That single photo (below) ignited one of the biggest chat sessions on WW, there have been over 64 comments posted around the boats provenance.
I attempted to summarize it into one read, which you will find along with a great photo gallery of her past at the WW link below. Make sure you read the comments, start at the bottom 😉 
 
 
Now back to the the Searle’s email – I have reproduced it below – rather a big project – well done guys, amazing effort – email me your T-shirt sizes and I will gift you a couple of WW t-shirts. Hopefully in person at this weekends Mahurangi Regatta.
 
“Well finally after a 4 1/2 years restoration we have relaunched Maharatia.
Last Wednesday (8th Jan 2020) Boat Haulage safely transported her up to Dockland 5 in Whangarei from the boat shed at Omaha. 
She is now berthed in Marsden Cove Marina
Colin Brown, Josh Hawke and owner Dave Searle have worked hard to help bring her back to a very solid representation of her former glory.
Just a brief overview of the restoration work
– Replaced 23 frames in hull
– Replaced garboard plank
– Replaced all keel bolts
– Replaced all through hull skin fittings
– Re-corked hull
– Replaced worm shoe
– Rebuilt shaft logs
– Rebuilt rudder logs
– New diesel tanks 
– Motors (2 x 6LX Gardner) rebuilt by Shaw diesels Ltd
– Replaced all fuel systems, lines and filters.
– Complete rehire and re-plumbed.
– All new toughened glass windows
– New dash panel, gauges and instruments
– New Interior, saloon and galley
– Raised and built new roof to increase headroom by 80mm
– New shower/head room built in.
– New capping on rail
– New exhaust system
– All porthole windows removed, new glass and seals fitted.
– 2 new hatches made. Fwd cabin and roof top.
– New anchor winch
– Aft deck, seating and storage compartments made and hatch to lazarette installed.
 …and Lastly a full repaint.
 
Looking forward to spending our summer on the water this year! 
We hope to be at the Mahurangi regatta In a few weeks time and catching up with other woody enthusiasts.”
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The South Passage – A Short Wooden Boat Film

SOUTH PASSAGE

Todays woody story comes to us from Andrew Christie in Brisbane, Andrew filmed and edited the short film on the glorious launch – South Passage, built in 1952 in Brisbane by Percy Tripcony.
South Passage is 50’ in length with a beam of 13’4”, and she draws 4’6”. The sound and footage of her Gardner 6LX diesel will be music to Dick Fisher’s (Akarana) ear and hopefully inspiration to Jamie Hudson (Lady Crossley) to get the tooth brush and Brasso out 😉
Sit back and enjoy 6 minute of wooden boat porn 🙂

Valerie – Gets A Birthday

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VALERIE – Gets A Birthday
During my recent trip up north, aboard Lady Crossley I visited the Opua Marina to attend the launch of Lady Ellen. While mooching around the hard-stand I spotted the 1929, Lane Motor Boat Co. built, 35’ launch Valerie. I last saw her in early 2018 in Whangaroa.
Valerie has had a change of ownership and is getting a ‘make-over’. When I spotted her at Opua , boatbuilder Ian Wood was hard at work getting her ready for a pre-xmas re-launch. The work would be best described as a ‘rollin restoration’. Included in the work to date is a re-power – out with the 65hp Ford and in with the 115hp Yanmar, check out her new prop – me thinks his old lady will be able to lift her skirt and dance 🙂

Read / see more on Valerie here:

LENORA – Woody Runabout

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Mystery  LENORA – Woody Runabout

John Wicks sent in the above photo of this very cute woody. John spotted her at the West Harbour marina launching ramp, mid December. John’s first thought was an early Mason Clipper, but the shape isn’t right for that. 
The blokes with her thought she could be an import, possibly from the US, and that she’d spent some “lake time” (Taupo?). She’s certainly been looked after.
John couldn’t tell how she’s planked, but it’s over stringers on web frames. The Volvo Penta engine and stern drive are apparently original gear. 
Anyone able to enlighten us on this woody?
Input from Angus Rogers – It is Lenora now back on Waitemata Harbour owned by John Stephens. It was a home build by Mr John Tonkin who was a dental surgeon. He built it on his basement in Auckland and then used it at his holiday home in Taupo for many years.

The Folly of Buying A Fixer-Upper With Mates

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The Folly of Buying A Fixer-Upper With Mates

Click the link below to read / view this great tales from ABC News – Australia, about 6 mates that took on the restoration of  – Southwinds (previously named Valhalla), a 70 year old, 18m, Hueon pine built classic ketch.
Thanks to Andrew Christie for the heads up on the story.

A Spirit of Tradition Woody + Win Prizes

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A Spirit of Tradition Woody

Today’s launch was designed American designer – Ted Brewer and appears to be based on the traditional Maine lobster boat. She was built in New Zealand in c.1989 from strip plank cedar epoxied and glassed. She measures 30’ overall with a beam of 9’1″ and draws 2’4”. A fully reconditioned Nissan SD22 provides the forward motion.

Her tme listing (thanks Ian McDonald) is very impressive and she appears to be good value for the asking price. Home port is Kerikeri.

WIN YOURSELF A COPY OF THE HOT OF THE PRESS BOOK – K CLASS

This could be the final WW competition before Santa slides down the chimney. As always – entry is via email only to waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Entries close midnight Friday 20-12-2019 . All correct entries will go into the draw for a copy of the book – K Class by Jenni Mence. Plus a bobby prize – a waitematawoodys t-shirt, drawn from all email entries received – correct or not.

Q waitematawoodys editorial assistant – Flora McKenzie shares her name with a pioneer  Auckland business women from the waterfronts past. What line of business was Flora in? Remember – enter via email only.

 

 

1958 16′ Runabout

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1958 16′ Runabout

I first saw todays Woody at the Lake Rotoiti (Nelson Lakes) Classic Boat Show and now thanks to tme & Ian McDonald, we get to see her ‘in the flesh’.
The woody is one of only 320 16’ Century Resorter runabouts built in the Michigan factory. 
She is still powered by her original (rebuilt) Ford Interceptor 272 / 150hp V8 engine.
The custom built trailer is a work of art and compliments the boat perfectly.
 
Mahurangi Cruising Club 2020 Yearbook OUT NOW
Just in time for Christmas – the Mahurangi Cruising Club 2020 Yearbook is now on sale. For most of us the best option to grab a copy is via Boat Boats in Westhaven (on-line as well) or order via the MCC facebook page. 
Design guru Steve Horsley is back on board and the book looks amazing. At $20 its the perfect Santa sack filler. 
The MCC are the powerhouse behind NZ’s biggest on-the-water wooden boating event -the Mahurangi Regatta , so pull the wallet out and buy a copy, as well as a great read you will be helping the MCC run the regatta.
MCC YB 2020 Cover

Twilight

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TWILIGHT
The 32’ carvel planked launch Twilight was built in 1954 by Strongman in Coromandel.
Power comes from a Perkins 4. 108 diesel engine.
Over the last 8 years Twilight has undergone an extensive ‘rolling restoration’ that included reconditioning the engine and gearbox, photos below.
Thanks to Ian McDonald for the tme heads up.

Martha

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MARTHA

We haven’t had a small clinker on WW for a while so Andy Hammond’s 14’ Sea Craft gets to shine today. Martha is kept in Cambridge but is a regular attendee at the Lake Rotoiti Classic and Wooden Boat Parade.
She was built c.1950 and is powered by a 6hp Petter diesel from the 1970’s, and sports a forward and reverse gearbox.
Andy is moving onto another woody project and needs the room so Martha is on the market for what I consider is a fair price – $4k, this includes a very smart tilt boom trailer. Break all my rules today – anyone looking for a very cute day boat contact Andy at. atepushrods@gmail.com.

Promethius

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PROMETHIUS

Mark Erskine was prompted when reading the recent WW article on the 1957 Owen Woolley launch to dig out the above photos of the 1967/68 Owen Woolley, twin 140hp TS3 powered launch – Promethius.
Todays photos were sent to Mark  by the then new owner, Terry Poole in November 2018. Terry had just purchased the launch – that had been moored in Wellington for years and had the launch transported by road to Auckland. The launch had been neglected and remained unused for many years before selling to Terry, and both TS3 engines – that would have been fitted from new – had done low hours. In the 3,500hrs range each from memory.

 

Both engines have rare, locally made, cast alloy marine conversions, including water cooled exhaust manifolds, coolant water reservoir that bolts to the engine thermostat housing, incorporating a mounting for Lees type heat exchanger, separate oil coolers, etc. Mark commented that he had seen this marine conversion on a previous single TS3 engine launch and although that conversion was badly corroded by decades of mindless neglect, the conversions appeared well designed and made. Mark doesn’t know who designed them or where in NZ they were cast, but possibly a long gone foundry in Otahuhu.

Mark has not seen Promethius in person and like us would be keen for an update on the status of the vessel. She does looks very similar to the Wellington based 1968 Owen Woolley launch – Acheron (also twin 140HP TS3 powered), but without Acheron’s  6 foot extension to the stern.

So Woodys – does anyone know where Promethius is (Gulf Harbour?) and intel on her?

Westhaven Marlin

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Westhaven Marlin

Now the headline might have excited a few fisherman but todays story isn’t about a game fish being sighted in the Inner Harbour.
Last Friday while driving along minding my own business, I spotted the above Marlin Marauder  parked up outside the Mercury dealer – Marineworx. Appeared to be receiving some TLC to the stern drive/leg.
Rather a smart woody in very good condition – anyone able to tell us more about her? There was no name on her stern. Her builders plate stated she was ‘Custom built by Sutton Mason & Co Ltd, Mt Roskill, Auckland.
Now on the subject of big game, I would be amiss if I didn’t remind the Auckland based Woodys about the big garage sale today at Salthouse Boatbuilders – details below and folks, a very nice bronze and timber game chair is centre stage.
ADDRESS: Salthouse Boatbuilders, 84 Rame Rd, Greenhithe, Auckland 0632
WHEN: TODAY – 9th November 
TIME: 10.am > 2pm
 
REMEMBER – CASH ONLY

Someone Stop Me

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Some One Stop Me
If I lived near a lake or Mahurangi etc – I would not be posting this story, I would be on-route to New Plymouth to buy this very cool double diagonal cold moulded kauri double ended day boat (thats a mouthful).
She measures approx 14’4” with the rudder on, built in 1970 in York Bay, Wellington.
Her motion is via a Petter 3.5hp diesel inboard, that was fitted c.1980s and has only done 40 hrs. Gearbox has N/F/R.
Her trailer hs been refurbished and fully road worthy.
Rod Prosser / Shawn Vennell – one of you must need another woody at the lake – perfect for the kids…………………
Thanks to Ian McDonald for the trademe heads up 😉

Lady Ellen Restoration – October Update

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LADY ELLEN RESTORATION – OCTOBER UPDATE

With a December launch date, Lady Ellen’s owner Bruce Mitchinson is on the downhill run – putting all the expensive bits on and hooking everything up.
Bruce’s words below tell us the status / list of things to do + the two videos show us the workmanship that is being ‘applied’ to the Lady.
Looking stunning 🙂
 

“Started painting the interior last Thursday.

Bunks have been removed to provide room to spray and some of the trim is out and being finished off site.
Moving from the forecastle backwards through to the cockpit, then we will tackle the decks.
Windows all patterned and should be in production tomorrow.

Bronze castings in the system and should be ready in a couple of weeks time.

Old mast is in the process of being remodelled to take hidden conduits for lights and gps antenna, and beefed up a bit to the right scale.
Galley and cockpit timber decking still to do after painting.
Electrics and plumbing gear all sorted but final fix still to go
 
VIDEO – PART ONE
 
VIDEO – PART TWO

Doreena / Dorina

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DOREENA / DORINA
Taupo woody Paul Drake was recently in Tauranga helping his brother Nigel give his boat – Freelance, some TLC. They spent some time reviewing Nigel’s colour slide collection from the 1970’s with a projector and screen.
One of the woodys in the collection was Doreena (not sure on the spelling could be Dorina), previously named – Argument and Doreen, when owned by the Pointon family. They bought her in a dilapidated condition. She was built in 1928, and sold to Auckland in 1978. Paul understands she slipped off the truck on her way north and ‘broke her back’, but was fitted with a magnificent new laminated douglas fir keel.
Both Paul and I would love to know what became of her?
Woodys Trip To Clevedon Cruising Club 16>17th November Update
On Saturday morning Barbara and David Cooke  and myself drove to Clevedon to check-out the location for next months Woody Classics Weekend cruise up the Wairoa River to the Clevedon Cruising Club.
The photos below give you a peek at the set-up, its perfect – big wharf, waterfront clubrooms with huge BBQ and ‘party’ area. The club is BYO, so pack that favourite bottle/s of Pinot. And yes Rosanne, its dog friendly 🙂
Given distance and tides, this is an overnight event. The location and clubrooms fit the bill of the perfect classic kiwi boating club – it will be a great night.
Thank you everyone that has RSVP’ed – great numbers, but if you haven’t replied yet – do it now. I do not want to scare you, but due to available space we may have to put a limit on the number of boats doing the trip – so now there’s an incentive to pull finger 🙂 We are working with the club to ensure we can fit everyone in.
RSVP to waitematawoodys@gmail.com   Just need you and your boats name.
REMEMBER WOODY CLASSICS WEEKEND EVENTS ARE NOT RUN BY OF THE CLASSIC YACHT ASSOCIATION – SO ATTENDANCE IS OPEN TO ALL NICE CLASSIC WOODEN BOAT OWNERS
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NIGHTINGALE + waitematawoodys hits 5,000,000 Views

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NIGHTINGALE + waitematawoodys hits 5,000,000 Views
The 55’ trawler cruiser started life in 1925, in Invercargill as a sailing ship, Later owned by the Leask family (Stewart Island) who strengthened and converted her to a trawler ‘ fright ship in the area for many years. In 1987 she was taken to Nelson and converted to a pleasure cruiser. In recent years (last 10) she has seen timber replacements and modernising too systems.
Her trademe listing (thanks Ian MacDonald) describes her as a floating bach and that is a good description of the life she has had in the Marlborough Sounds. Sleeping for 8 people and all the home comforts aboard (42” TV) would make for enjoyable Sounds cruising.
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Her beam is 11’5” and she draws 5’5”. Power is via a Detroit 671, that has her cruising at 7 knots.
Any one able to tell us the designer / builder?
Waitematawoodys Gets 5 Million Views
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At some stage last night or early this morning the waitematawoodys.com site clock clicked over the 5 million views mark – I got the biggest buzz when it hit 5,000 and then 1,000,000 – these days its a freight train – just keeps on rolling 24/7.
Why do I do it? – the #1 reason is to motivate people to use their wooden boats more and to enjoy the classic wooden boating lifestyle.
Some of you have been around since day one and stayed the distance, some are what I call ‘flirters’ you come and go and that’s all good.
The back library is very impressive – over 1/2 the daily views these days are people using the site as a reference tool eg searching for details on a particular boat. Sometimes the odd story  might be a bit lame but it gets into the WW system and over time can grow e.g. someone searches the boats name and next thing we have a new (better) story on the same boat and it kick starts the old story.
It is always try to be to be entertaining and informative. I also try very hard to be factual but if we get it wrong – tell us and if you are in fact right, we will correct it.
I never started out to create an encyclopaedia of classic wooden boats – the idea was to create some good chat around what’s happening in the classic wooden boating community.
I also never intended for the stories to be daily, but the appetite was there and I soon discovered there was no shortage of content out there.
Sometimes, not often, after some moron has sent me a nasty email, I question why I do it, but then I have some chat (on-line) with cool people that make it worthwhile e.g there are a lot of blokes that have spent their life in and around wooden boats and these days reading WW is a highpoint in their day. I like that 🙂
I encourage you to use the comments section.
To those of you working on woody projects – send us updates / photos, we love projects. Send to waitematawoodys@gmail.com
Thank you for your support ‘flying the WW flag’ via wearing the WW t-shirts – they pop up all over the world.
Best Regards
alan houghton – waitematawoodys founder
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Andiamo

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ANDIAMO

The 20′ Andiamo was originally  known as the  ‘Yellow Boat’ on Lake Rotoiti near Rotorua. She was built by a farmer from Gisborne in 1949 and was reputedly the fastest boat on Rotoiti back then.

She came to her current owners 10 years ago, who undertook a 4 year restoration project to bring her back to her former glory. The work included partial hull replacement, structural framework enhancement and strengthening using marine grade ply, kauri and stainless steel fixings. All timber used was locally milled kauri in keeping with the original construction, and came from a single tree thus the beautiful consistency in the decking – handcrafted piece by piece using kauri with a kahikitea accent and mahogany surround.

The original Dodge 6 was replaced with a 275ci alloy V8 producing 280hp, running through a Borg Warner gearbox to the bespoke brass prop. The engine is computer controlled, inter-cooled and muffled, providing amazingly smooth, quiet and reliable power.

Andiamo is an iconic piece of New Zealand maritime history that has been preserved and is now offered for sale. Her owners  want her to go on to her next adventure with a new family – and are selling well below value. to make that happen.

Andiamo will be available for viewing at Lake Tarawera over Labour Weekend.

(thanks to Rod Prosser for the trademe heads up)

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RSVP   waitematawoodys@gmail.com

 

 

 

Jaguar – mini me

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JAGUAR – mini me
 
John Bullivant is a very talented man, one of his talents is building classic boating models – not the kit-set ones, we are talking about drafting them by eye from what ever resources are still around. John had mentioned he was keen to build one of the 40’ Jaguar, which he had wanted to build since back in the days when she was moored down the road from John’s place at Bucklands Beach in the 1960’s > 1980’s, (the photo of her on the hard at Bucklands in the 1970’s below). 
John didn’t have a plan to go off, just this photo, some movie grabs from Ken Rickets and some info from on-line sources. The model is R/C and powered with two water cooled (pump) 540 brushed motors and has independent motor control. It also has twin sound units (unfortunately they haven’t got Detroits in the program, but they make a reasonable sound – check out the youtube link below.
Has the usual lights etc, and cooling water comes out of the exhausts and side telltales. Model is glass over planked balsa with a ply deck and balsa coamings.

Youtube video of the model –https://youtu.be/VqUNmWlKdGw

 

 Previous WW story on Jaguar.  https://waitematawoodys.com/2014/08/16/looking-for-jaguar/

 
Its the 2nd Woody Classics Weekend today – 20+ boats cruising to the Stillwater Motor Camp for a picnic – lots of photos tomorrow 🙂
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UPDATE: Photos below showing John’s attention to detail – the one of the original boat under way (ex Ken Ricketts video footage, filmed in the 1970’s) and the one of the ‘as launched’ model (also ex KR) – shows matching colours on the deck and dinghy.
Plus more from KR of the launch day.

Governor

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GOVERNOR
I got a subtle dig in the ribs yesterday that (a) I hadn’t featured anything very quick of late and (b) there had been a noticeable lack of varnish – So todays woody is a very ‘fresh’ restoration / rebuild i.e just launched (2019).
Governor started life back in the 1960’s, with the hull being built by Brin Wilson, her trademe listing comments that she was originally built following the lines of Chris Craft boats.
The project saw her totally rebuilt (in fact lengthened by 6’ – now 21’3″), glassed and a reconditioned 2016 4.3L 214hp Mercuriser TKS engine installed. One of the lake boys needs to buy her……….
Thanks to Rod Prosser for the elbow in the ribs 🙂