Building Fritha – Sailing Sunday

Fritha 4

Building Fritha –  Sailing Sunday

Following on from the stunning WW post on the McMullen & Wing built 74’ brigantine – Fritha, Chris McMullen has shared with us a gallery of photos from the build.
In Chris’s words – it shows a bunch of mainly young guys building a proper sailing ship. Chris commented how lucky they all were to have had that opportunity. The photos should be credited to M&W ex apprentice Grant Thomas who was the leading hand on Fritha.
 
The Fritha was built traditionally but certainly not by eye. You may notice the cabin trunks were well underway before the hull was planked. This was possible because M&W had a very experienced team. The workmanship got better every boat they built but the estimate of time was exceeded. (Chris stressed how lucky they were to have an understanding owner who appreciated what he got). Further, it became almost impossible to get good wood. Chris’s business partner Eric Wing was by then running their haul out yard at Westhaven.
Sadly “Fritha” was the last real boat M&W built. M&W was sold and became a ship yard rather than a boatyard.
While most people associate M&W as metal boat builders, Chris said that they did that, as we had to. There is nothing wrong with a wooden boat providing it is built properly of good timber. There was no wood left so it was metal or frozen snot. They chose to build metal boats but employed mainly woodworkers.
Chris would like to pass on thanks to the late owner of “Fritha” Mr JR Butland and the loyal team he had that built some beautiful yachts. 
 
View the previous WW story on Fritha here – lots of photos  https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/02/24/fritha/

Fritha 18

A Woody Tour Of Helensville / Upper Kaipara

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

Florance M

A Woody Tour Of Helensville / Upper Kaipara  

Following on from last Mondays stunning story on the boats resting in the Tamaki River (link below if you missed it), woody John Bullivant has been out & about again – this time his focus has been the Helensville & Kaipara Cruising Club. I have ID / tagged the photos where known, just scroll over to view the name). Again I’ll let John tell the story 🙂

“I did another boat hunting tour to Helensville on 6 Feb and found a few more wooden working boats and others parked on the mud at the fishing wharf and Kaipara Cruising Club . They are a friendly bunch at the club and allowed me to go onto the private jetties to take some photos, even unlocking a gate for me which was much appreciated. The couple I spoke to have a converted ex fishing boat (Waimiko I think ) with a 185HP Nissan and all the gear, which they say makes a perfect solid pleasure boat. 

The big Miller & Tunnage canoe stern La Vega ? also is Nissan powered but U/S at the moment and may be for sale ( hull looks in good nick and built like the proverbial BSH) and would make a great pleasure convert and sea boat. There are a number of interesting boats there including the nice looking bridge decker further up. Couldn’t get a good pic but looks like she’s having some work done? Also found Florence M (now with M painted over) on the hard there, back to the side she started on ? 

One thing that was of particular nostalgic interest (sort of ) was the little plastic ‘Scuppers tug’ (think that’s what the called them) tucked in the corner. If I’m not mistaken, this little boat resided at Half Moon Bay Marina way back in the early 80s when new, and I have an idea it was their little marina work boat, (I’m pretty sure it’s not from the other Half Moon Bay but would be a weird coincidence if it was). I even contemplated buying one when they came out (under $12,000 from memory) Stange place to find it.

The interesting little boat on the drums and the old planked Mullet boat? are on the Northern end of Helensville over the rail lines. All in all a great day out and finished of with great local fish and chips (found out the shop owner lived not far from me at Whangaparaoa before moving to Helensville,)  NZ is small,- once stayed overnight in the Hunterville motel, and the people who had recently bought it had lived not far from me in Bucklands beach, we Kiwis certainly move around along with our boats.”

CYA Classic Yacht Regatta 2019 – Race #1 – 37 Photos

P1050313

Rawhiti & Ariki

P1050275

Ranger

P1050291

Little Jim

 

P1050315

Rainbow

CYA Classic Yacht Regatta 2019 – Race #1 – 37 Photos

At the end of the day I shot down to Devonport Wharf with the tele-lens & just caught the fleet sliding down the harbour, a little overcast but that would have been a + for the crews.
I’ll attempt to ID the yachts – scroll over the photos to see names – if I get it wrong, let me know 😉
 
As you read this I’ll be winging my way south to Lake Rotoiti (Nelson Lakes) for the 20th NZ Antique & Classic Boat Show, mooching around Nelson for a few days so should have some good southern content next week.
IMG_0578

A Woody Tour of the Tamaki River – 70 photos

A Woody Tour of the Tamaki River – 70 photos

Todays story so needed to be done, and woodys, John Bullivant is a legend for grabbing his camera and heading out on our behalf. I’ll let John tell his story 🙂

“Thought it was about time I got a few photos on the Tamaki River boats before they disappear, (and they are going fast by the look of some). There are only a fraction of the numbers of wooden boats that were moored there in the 1960s and 1970s and as I previously mentioned, living on the waterfront at Bucklands Beach for around 25yrs I had seen most of them go by (was like Queen St on Friday nights most summer weekends) I did 2 trips down from Orewa and took pics from Panmure Boat Club and up to and under the new Panmure Bridge, end of Gabadore Pl (off Carbine Rd), the old Panmure Marina, (going with many houses from Panmure to Pakuranga Town centre, to make way for new highway widening), along the Tamaki River walkway for about 4km (Rotary Walk,- starts at the old Panmure Marina and goes all the way to Gills Rd in Howick, for those who like walking), Half Moon Bay and Bucklands Beach.

I also went down to the 1960s site of the private ex RNZAF W1  haul-out ramp below the old Alright property (well covered in bush now and a near vertical climb down a 30ft bank), – lost a bit of blood but well worth it for me, as I last stood on that spot 50yrs ago when we sneaked on board W1 to have a look around while she was up there. Original ramp and haul-out dolly is still there (see pics) although time has taken its toll. I’m amazed, looking at the crude set-up today, how Mr Alright got a 64ft boat weighing many tons, sitting on rubber tyred dollies (which ran in grooved concrete) lined up and hauled out with a winch and by the looks of it, the large tree in line with the ramp, not to mention getting it back out again (I’m assuming he must have winched it back out somehow). Massive effort not only to build the ramp on mud, (all by hand, no concrete pumping trucks) but to be able to use it.

Hope these photos are of interest to people who may be able to identify some of the mystery boats (especially the light blue launch with the chrome ventilators and light, (looks ex RNZAF ?). The yacht hidden near the big boatshed is around 45ft looks very old and has been there for many years, as has poor old Imatra, a once grand yacht which is in a very sad state and in urgent need of care (must have been there 30 yrs odd now). I have included a few other launches and yachts to show the sad state of many good looking (and once expensive) boats on the river crying out for attention, but I guess many people have other priorities and sadly their dreams are just floating slowly into oblivion. It’s pretty hard to get rid of a rusty rotten hulk, so there they will stay till it’s “business time” (flight of the Conchords) for the 20 ton digger.

I may have some of the boats names wrong as I was using a telephoto lens for most of the pics and with enhancing colour, contrast etc was as near as I could get. I’m sure someone will correct any if wrong.”

NOTE: With the photos that John has named, I have tagged the photos with those names. Scroll over the photos to view the names 😉
I could have used the individual images on WW over an extended period, but they need to be together in one spot. Enjoy 🙂

Chalyn

Screen Shot 2019-02-19 at 8.51.50 PM

Screen Shot 2019-02-19 at 8.49.51 PM

Screen Shot 2019-02-19 at 8.49.31 PM

CHALYN
 
Being built in 1978 Chalyn certainly slides into the Spirit of Tradition category, and there are not a lot of those on WW – what twisted my arm was the 1 1/4” kauri planked hull, with ribs every 6” – she is built like the proverbial brick out house. 
She is listed for sale on trademe and being sold as her two aging brother owners have reached a stage where maintaining a 52’ wooden boat with a 14’ beam is too much for them. 
Power is via a 318hp Detroit diesel that sees her cruising at 10 knots with a 12 knot top speed.
 
I know everyone has their own view on beauty and practicability but Jason Prew with a battery powered tungsten tipped mini skill-saw could do wonders for her looks 😉

Australian Wooden Boat Festival 2019 – Photo Parade – Part 3 – 90 photos + video

Photo 8-02-19, 18 21 59

Photo 8-02-19, 18 22 14

Photo 8-02-19, 08 45 37

TAMARIKI – Peter Mortimer

Australian Wooden Boat Festival 2019 – Photo Parade – Part 3 – 90 photos + video

For the few of you that have seen enough beautiful boats in the last few days, I promise today will be the last AWBF photo gallery. But for the record Tuesdays AWBF WW story out performed Mondays story and had in fact the highest number of views of any story on WW in the last 12 months 🙂
Today our gallery comes to us from the camera of CYA NZ Chairperson – James  Mortimer. On top of capturing some great photos, James was in a very unique position at the festival – his father Peter was exhibiting the 1979, Gary Wheeler built yacht – Tamariki (photo above), which was the only NZ flagged boat in attendance, and they briefly had the past two NZ CYA chairs and the current one on board for a beer at the same time, nice.
Again, different person = different perspective – enjoy and remember , click on photos to enlarge.
And as a bonus we also have a video of the James Craig leaving her dock – would be nice to have a vessel of her presence based on the Waitemata. Filmed by Andrew Christie.

Australian Wooden Boat Festival 2019 – Photo Parade – Part 2 – 337 photos

DSC05566

DSC05184

DSC05461

DSC05551

Australian Wooden Boat Festival 2019 – Photo Parade – Part 2 – 337 photos

One of the interesting things reviewing all the photos that have been sent in from the festival is that each person ’sees’ the festival through different eyes – so what they end up photographing is very different from someone else.
Todays collection from Fiona Driver and Rod Marler is a perfect example, it is a very different view from yesterdays and also shows the scale of the event. Worthy of its own WW story.
I could have edited the collection down, but the photographer/s are very passionate woodys so if the image appealed to them, I’m confident it will to you. Enjoy 🙂
Scroll down after todays photo gallery to view more of the festival in Part 1 of the coverage.
And remember , click on photos to enlarge.