Arita > Edna White

 

Screen Shot 2019-07-28 at 9.32.51 PM

AUTA   Arita > Edna White

Today’s photo of Auta is dated 1916 but I’m not sure if that’s the build date or when the photos taken.
Photo comes to us via Lew Redwood’s fb.
Anyone know the provenance of Auta and where she is today?
Harold Kidd Input – That’s a nice pic of ARITA (not AUTA) built by Logan Bros in April 1909 for R.O. Clark of the brickworks at Hobsonville. She was later rebuilt and renamed EDNA WHITE and used as a ferry on the run to Kohimarama. She was totally burnt out in 1927. I’m sure she has appeared in WW before as either ARITA or EDNA WHITE.
She did Harold – link below 🙂




https://waitematawoodys.com/2018/10/09/arita/

Something Completely Left Field
Adrian Pawson is a very talented, clever lad – works with Southern Spars on high end tech projects but his pleasure interests go from restoring VW Combis, Seagull (outboard) racing to ‘turbo charging’ (carbon fibre everything) Townson sailing dinghies.
Arian recently acquired a light weather foil off one of the Oracle AC50 boats – cost new $250,000+ . So too good to bin it, so its been re-born as a swing in his garden. I understand there is 2 ton of concrete under the purpose built carbon mounting bracket.Check out the 316ss bolts – those alone would blow my budget 🙂
67830975_10156706182196492_1215199659975245824_o

Naomi (Huria > Vanora) + John Street taking about the steam crane Rapaki

IMG_2052

IMG_2057

IMG_2056

NAOMI – Huria > Vanora

One of WW spotters, Shane  Anderson was driving thru Whangateau this week and spotted a woody parked up on a yard in the middle of a major restoration.
Turns out the 45’ launch is named Naomi (see interior carving photo) – the boatbuilder – Josh, working on her believes there may have been a name change in the past, but if so, a long time ago – the skylights have Naomi sandblasted on them. There is talk of her possibly being a Logan and even originally steam powered. Also talk of a 1897 build date. Her name board records her builder as Chas. Bailey. Investigation shows the existence of 3 sets of engine beds.
There also appears to be old repairs to both sides of the boat.
Her current owner has had her for 20 years, kept in dry storage in West Auckland.
A suggestion – in a previous WW story (link below) on a launch named Naomi III, Harold Kidd spoke of the original Naomi (I) being built in March 1902 and Naomi II in November 1902, both by Chas. Bailey Jnr and both for M.A. Jenny of Nelson. Could the above launch be one of these boats?
Input from Harold Kidd – The story is unbelievably complex; the NAOMI bit is the result of an assumption on someone’s part, many years ago, that any launch owned by M A Jenny of Nelson and Auckland was a NAOMI. This launch seems to have started life as the oil launch HURIA (twin 2 cylinder Daimler petrol engines) built by Logan Bros in January 1899 for Capt Mercer of Nelson as a trader, bought by Jenny in 1905, fitted with a 30hp Gardner in Wellington and rechristened VANORA. In 1907 Jenny sold her to Lindsay Cooke of Auckland who got Chas Bailey Jr to refit her for cruising. She took part in the 1908 RNZYS Rudder Cup race around Sail Rock.
Need several pages more to bring her up to date.
In summary, the current name and builder carved into her is bs.

JOHN STREET – ONE MAN’S TREASURES VIDEO SERIES – Part 5

IMG_1663
Every day this week WW we are featuring a video filmed at John’s recent speaking engagement at the New Zealand Maritime Museum. The language is a tad ‘blue’ in places, but thats how John rolls 🙂 NOTE VIDEO IS COPYRIGHT DO NOT DOWNLOAD WITHOUT PERMISSION. Videos edited & enhanced with the help of Andrew Christie. 
PART Five – The Steam Crane Rapaki (turn your sound up)
UPCOMING VIDEOS
MONDAY–         Fosters The Beginning
TUESDAY–        History of The Breeze
WEDNESDAY– The schooner Daring
THURSDAY–     Amercias Cup
FRIDAY –            The steam crane ship Rapaki
SATURDAY–      Tug Boat Racing on the Waitemata
 

Arita

Arita

ARITA

Todays photo is ex Lew Redwood / NZ cars, boats……. FB page. (Originally ex Auckland Museum, Winkleman collection). It shows the 1909 Logan Bros built launch Arita, seen here in the Bay of Islands
Zoom zoom was via twin 15-20hp 2 cylinder Kelvins.
Details ex Harold Kidd.
Do we know what became of Arita?

Harold Kidd Input – ARITA had a sad end. She was a double tunnel hull 48 footer with twin 15-20hp 2 cylinder Kelvins built for R.O. Clark & Co of Birkenhead by Logan Bros in April1909 but sold to H H Adams in June 1910 to replace ELIZA (now KUMI). Adams owned Moturoa Island in the Bay of Islands so this is where the pic was taken. She was active in NZPBA races and events until Adams sold her in 1919 to Charles Hansen (later of Moturekareka) who renamed her WAIOURU.
She reverted to ARITA for a while until Capt. G H White bought her in 1924 and rebuilt her for carrying 94 passengers on the run to St Heliers, Kohimarama, Orakei and Beachlands. A 45hp 4 cylinder heavy duty Gardner costing 500 pounds was fitted. He renamed her EDNA WHITE.
On 30th April 1927 she caught fire, was beached and burnt out at Kohimarama.She was valued at 3000 pounds, an enormous sum at the time.
All the buffs who rely on the Register of British Ships for source material say she was built in 1912 by Arch Logan because that’s what Capt White put down on the registration form in 1924. Maybe he thought “Arch Logan” carried more weight than “Logan Bros” and “1912” was preferable to “1909” or maybe he was just wrong/careless. I’ll bet on the latter, but this is how bunkum becomes history.
Here endeth the lesson………..

PS Note the “conning tower” control position right forward on the coachroof, an early move towards the bridgedecker.

 

 

Karoro

Unknown

KARORO

Another photo bought to us via Lew Redwood’s FB postings – this time the Karoro, the Logan Bros built launch.

In the above photo we see her just after her launching on 21st February 1906.

If I have the facts right & she is the same bought – Harold Kidd has previously commented that Karoro went north to Whangarei in 1916 as a passenger launch owned by H H Jagger of Taurikura and had a name change to TUNA around 1932 when she was sold to the Thames (HDK – correct?)

Anyone able to comment on what became of her?

Harold Kidd Input – Like most launches she had a complex history, name changes etc. She was in Whangarei from 1916-1921, then to Gisborne 1921-1925, back to Whangarei, back to Gisborne 1928-1932 then Thames then to Auckland in 1934 to be sold by auction in a mortgagee sale on 13th July 1934 as TUNA, bought by J J Craig then sold to A.E. Hite. I think she might have been the fishing boat TUNA that reported a floating mine off Coromandel in late January 1941 owned by N. E Owens of Auckland, but there were many TUNAs.

 

Maxie

MAXIE

image1

image2

image3

 

 

 

MAXIE

Greg Noble sent me the above stunning photos of Maxie; Logan Bros built the launch in 1903. These photos mostly show her in The Sounds. Greg’s granddad owned Maxie through the 1920’s. In recent times, Greg has seen her on Lake Taupo, with topsides reworked by Bruce Askew.

Now here is where the story gets a little unusual – Greg’s interest these days in the launch, is only as a working boat, not a cruiser. He has set his sights on building her anew, with original hull and sheerline, open fore and aft of a small doghouse, somewhere between what she had and that of Matareka 1 (her sister). None of the mod cons, oiled timbers rather than varnished, a tiller rather than a wheel and an electric power train and batteries stored in-line with her keel below waterline. He wants to build her on the grass 10m from the shore and in a very traditional and economic way. He has native timbers at hand: pohutakawa for her prow, keel, stern and gunwales and kauri for her splashboard and fore and aft decks, doghouse and floorboards.

However, Greg wants to have her hull delivered in two pre-made fiberglass pieces which he will fit either side of her spine. The whole job done in 3 months start to finish for two (older) men – Greg, a very hands on architect and his brother, a life long sailor.

Greg is seeking help / advice from the WW brains trust – he would like to talk this built concept through with some of your wiser members. He is thinking of guys who know the timbers well but in particular, needs help in confirming the exact dimensions of her hull – could any original drawings exist? He has sent a message to Bruce Askew who might have measured and drawn her in the early 1990’s. Any advice & leads would be much appreciated.

Input from Greg Noble“Yes, two boats appeared in Alan’s original article – both sets of photos are from my grand dad’s journal and I thought it opportune to share with WW at the same time. Of the two, the Maxie was my grand dad’s boat (Perceval Noble), my dad often talked of her and my aunt most recently recalled her being mored in the lower reaches of the Hutt River, close to Percy’s home, so she must have crossed the straight many times. Maxie is the sister to Matareka 1, both Logan, 1903. I have looked at her in Taupo and am delighted to see her alive and loved, but also frustrated that she has moved on and gone “up in the world” and is beyond any possibility of a return to her routes a working boat. By way of explanation for what might seem to most – madness, I believe the world is losing control of growth and that we all need to step back and refocus on a what is immediately around us. I find that I cant discuss this without an overwhelming negativity descending on both preacher and listener. So, I have set my mind to doing it – using traditional processes, local materials and skills together with the appropriate modern technologies in a creative and positive way that will serve a regenerating local environment and need. So, for anybody who dares to open the discussion with me, I promise to focus entirely on the creative task ahead, and I will spare you the drudgery of knowing the reasons why. Fingers crossed and thank you the air time”.

16-02-2018 Input from Ray Morey

MAXIE got an 8 page write-up in the “Wooden boat magazine” August 1995 no.125 story by Peter Freeman. There are some beautiful photo’s in there too.
Greg Noble, your concept has been done here where I live in Sth.East Queensland Australia. The boat concerned was built around 1900 and used to tow log rafts and later, log barges before becoming a fishing boat. The owner built an outside skeleton then stripped the inside, all ribs framing and such then used the hull as a female mold and layered up a fibre glass skin. He retained the original backbone, stem-keel deadwood and stern post. The power unit is a 110 hp. Iveco Fiat with 2:1 red. She is ready to go in the water now but the owner has health issues and probably won’t finish her. Photos below

Rawhiti – Revisited

So far there have been over 2,000 classic wooden boat stories featured on waitematawoodys & the viewing numbers (3,300,000) have grown from a dozen people to over 80,000, I have had some loyalists from day one but the big numbers have happened in the last 2 years – so not everyone will have been exposed to all the stories. Over the Christmas / NY period I have decided to take a peek back in time & feature some of the gems from the early days. Enjoy.

Have a great holiday & remember to take the camera / phone with you & snap a photo of any woodys you see. Email them to waitematawoodys@gmail.com

 

Rawhiti – A Once In Your Life Time Opportunity
photos ex Classic Boat, Chris Miller, Alan H & owner

Firstly – a challenge – can anyone dispute that Rawhiti is New Zealand’s finest classic yacht afloat? From all angles she is simply beautiful, a true classic from the drawing board of Arch Logan & built by Logan Bros.
Rawhiti was completely rebuilt by Peter Brookes at Brookes Boatbuilders in 2011. For her owner Greg Lee, it was a pure labour of love, he extensively researched every aspect of the project & worked alongside Peter on a daily basis, the end result being a Logan that is better than launch day in October 1906 & thats pretty bold statement to make about a Logan.

Yachts like Rawhiti only come along once in a life time, to get the chance to buy one is even rarer. That opportunity now exists, to do that – to own this beautiful piece of New Zealand’s maritime heritage, a floating work of art.

So my 2nd challenge today is to all classic boating aficionados – gather your friends or business associates & form a syndicate, sell that bloody ugly Colin McCahn, sell a few shares, sub-divide that section – do what ever you have to do, to put the money together to acquire Rawhiti.

Interested? – read on

Without boring you with details, Rawhiti’s owner is serious about selling her & now via another business transaction has the opportunity to offer Rawhiti for sale to the right owner for a fractional of the restoration cost i.e. in the $400k range.
The time window in which the business transaction is available is short and therefore there is a limit to how long Rawhiti will be marketed in this price range. If you are interested in discussing the sale, please initially, contact the owner Greg Lee on the email address below.
For anyone with an interest in acquiring Rawhiti who is unsure what they might be doing with her in the short term (but wishing to secure the opportunity to acquire her now), her owner has had provisional discussions with Peter Brookes about storing her under cover at his yard at favourable rates.

Owner email contact:       greg-lee@xtra.co.nz

Update 29-09-2019 Below is a  sneak peek at Rawhiti when she was in Australia – the photo appeared in the Sept 1925 edition of the ‘Australian Motor Boating and Yachting Monthly. Sent in by Andrew Christie.

IMG_6571

Memories of Ariki – A3

Screen Shot 2017-12-07 at 11.50.35 am

Memories of Ariki A3

I was sent the great story below by Mark Newcomb via woody Brian Fulton, Mark wrote it for a recent Ariki (the 1904 Logan Brothers gaffer) reunion. Enjoy the read, it’s a great peek back into yachting in the 1960’s, so many familiar names & locations. Thank god the claret & lemonade early morning eye-opener drink did not make it into the 21st century. (photo above ex Mac Taylor collection)

“I started crewing on Ariki around 1963, aged 19, and sailed with the team for some 15 years, continuing through to the Northerner with them.

Hugh Littler worked as a valuer for Neville Newcomb Ltd., and dad (Pat) of course knew Arthur Angel well through RNZYS, as did my uncle Hal.

The crew then was going through a bit of a change as the friends of Hugh were getting married, children, etc.  Arthur and Hugh shared ownership I think.  Cove Littler had own Kitenui at that stage.

Regular crew when I joined were Jim (Boom Boom) Bailey, Ted Grey (plumber Devonport), John Downer, Dr Ray Talbot, Bill Donovan, Bob Fenwick, young Bruce McKay, Peter Svenson, Peter Cooper, and I introduced John Compton, Laurie Gubb, and Tom Taylor. John Denley sometimes crewed.  Also some others, can’t remember! Warwick Jones (subsequent owner) joined the crew a little later. 

The yacht was moored at Devonport near the RNZN dockyards.

There was keen competition between Bruce, Peter, and myself to become the main topmast hand, as we saw this as a glamour job.  I loved coming into a bay with all rag flying, and showing off my skill at whipping up the mast and letting fly the gaff topsail.  Peter, Bruce, and I became the main foredeck hands.  Hugh was sailing master, Arthur main helm, Jim B on main and spinnaker, John D and Bill D on headsail trim.  Foredeck was pretty dangerous with wildly flapping wooden blocks on clew strops and stiff canvas, big sails.  No winches at all. Bob was enthusiastic steward.

A racing crew of around 13.  Sometimes full 12 hands on main sheet, stretched out along leeward deck, up to your knees in rushing water.

Double purchase ‘handybillies’, rove to advantage, were used to get the last few feet in on the sheets.  New set of Rattray(?) sails a big deal. 4500 sq. foot sail, huge spinnaker, and newfangled genoa/gennaker. Heavy gear.

Seamanship was necessary. The most wonderful powerful yacht, a sailing delight.

Winter haul out at Devonport Yacht Club, old winch, and dangerous shunting of 19 ton ‘Rik on ways greased with mutton fat and timber jacks.  Old local guy always took charge of this, a big day.

Masonic Hotel was very close and ‪6am opening was a constant attraction for crew when we were supposed to be scrubbing down, sanding, varnishing, Singapore Copper antifoul, etc.  Pin line on hull was picked out in gold leaf, but this was changed to gold paint in later years.

After winter make over, trip down to ‘Drunks Bay’, (Islington) under motor, with minimal rig, then the big task of stringing up the running rig.  Ropes everywhere, but fun.  Ropes to be spliced, whipped, wormed/parceled/served/, and riven through the many blocks etc.

Another young man’s job was releasing the fixed prop and shaft prior to racing.  One of us young bucks would dive over and dive down with the heavy bronze 3 blade prop and 2 meter shaft (secured with a lanyard to the top), insert the shaft into the A Bracket, push it home into the stern gland, knocking out the internal wooden bung, to be attached to the engine drive. Then untangle the lanyard, and surface.  The test was to do this in one breath!  A whiskey/milk was usually the reward.  The process was reversed at the end of the race, often in a crowded anchorage, much to the astonishment of the observers.  Another glamour job!  Unbelievably, a few years earlier this job was done by Hugh, who not being a diver, was strapped into a diving bell made of a kerosene can with a glass window puttied into it.  This was put over his head, he sat in the Bosun’s Chair with some chain wrapped around him for weight, then was lowered over the side from the swung out main boom.  A rope slung under the stern pulled him under the counter to line up the shaft with the A Bracket etc.  It had some sort of bicycle air pump, and I think a speaking tube up to Cove on deck.  I saw this contraption under their Vauxhall Road home, and now wish I had saved it! (Mark, later discovered that this tale was an urban legend, created to motivate junior crew members (i.e. Mark) to go over the side)

Having no prop power meant a lot of our manoeuvring was under sail only, often including back winding and stern boards, highlighted the skills of these sailormen,.

Our competition included Ranger, Rawhiti, Ta Aroa, Kahurangi, Achernar, Moana, Thelma, Fidelis, and another dozen or so.

With our gaff rig, no winches, heavy boat, we struggled to take line honours, but did OK on handicap. After a few years the light displacement yachts started to appear- Innnesmara, Infidel and Buccaneer, Neville Price’s Volante, etc.  We expected these new wonders to fall apart, but usually just saw them zoom past us.

The fleet was littered with strong personalities, Joe Kissen, Tom Clark, Lew Tercel, the Duder’s, Bressen Thompson, Jim Davern, Andy Donovan. Fraters, Arnold Baldwin, Peter Cornes, Gordon Pollard, Bill Endean, Roy McDell, Wilf Beckett, Cove Littler,  ……. the list goes on, and on.  Of course there was our own Arthur Angel, Hugh Littler, Ray Talbot, Jim Bailey. Kahurangi under Willie Wilson always seemed to have a team of female followers, as did Arohia with Speed Alan and Pussy Catlow coming to mind.

We had many notable visitors on board- Lord Cobham, Francis Chichester, Adlard Coles (Heavy Weather Sailing), etc.

Cake days, normally a Sunday, were always great fun.  Long Christmas cruises to Bay of Islands very special- my uncle Hal based at Opunga keenly awaiting his play mates Bob, Arthur and Hugh.  Cruises up to Whangaroa wonderful.  Te Kouma race and Squadron Weekend at Kawau.  Somehow, being another era before the cell phone, we all stayed away on endless adventures without a thought, or the means, of rushing home.

Gordons Gin and water was the tipple of the senior members, beer for us- and plenty of it.  A strange drink, Claret and Lemonade, was often our early morning eye opener.

There was a strong sense of heritage, ceremony and formality amongst the merriment.  Flags, watch keeping, dress, respect of senior members, nautical customs, shipshape and Bristol fashion! – not strongly enforced, just understood and expected.  Arthur an ex Commodore, and Hugh a Flag Officer- later Commodore on Northerner- so expectations high.

These are just some random memories- there are many others.”  

2017 Centreboard Cup – Herne Bay Yacht Club – TODAY  9th Dec –  @ Sloanes Beach, Herne Bay

Starting at midday today, the Herne Bay Crusing Club are hosting their legendary Centreboard Cup Regatta. Its one of the coolest sailing events in town & the venue is rather special.

Details here   http://hbcc.net.nz/centreboardcup2017/

And check out my photos from a previous regatta. https://waitematawoodys.com/2015/12/20/whats-the-coolest-yacht-club-10-minutes-from-queen-st/

 

Pirate – Sailing Sunday

Pirate being built at Little Barrier Is.

Under construction c.1903 at Little Barrier Island

Pirate Port Fitzroy GBI

Port Fitzroy GBI – May 1903

Pirate in cave

Big cave – NE Coast – April 1904

 

Ilex & Pirate Port Fitzroy

Ilex & Pirate at anchor – Port Fitzroy GBI – May 1903

Pirate Ashore

June 27 1907

Pirate wrecked again

 

Pirate wrecked & final resting place

Final resting place

PIRATE – Sailing Sunday

Pirate was built by Robert H. Shakespear in a shed alongside his house on Little Barrier Island c1903.

Shakespear was a talented boat builder & worked for the Logan Bros and was involved in Ilex (seen in the above photos) and built Frances at Logans’ yard as a close twin to Victory.

He also had the Logan built clinker keeler Pandora to service his little farm on Little Barrier where he was custodian for a while.

Sadly, Little Barrier was not a friendly home to Pirate & she was ‘wrecked’ twice, the first time during a hard SW gale in June 1907, she was repaired but the second in July 1908 was fatal & she was winched ashore & put to rest under the tress on the Island.

(Photo credits & details – J Russell via the Hocken Collection, University of Otago, Nathan Herbert & Harold Kidd)

The 1895 C&W Bailey Yacht IDA For Sale

Ida resides in Australia these days & her owners have advised that they are interested to hear from anyone that would consider purchasing her (& hopefully repatriating her home).

Harold Kidd has commented on WW that IDA was built by C. & W. Bailey for the Jagger brothers and Frater and launched on 21 December 1895. She was a contemporary and competitor to the other 5 rater of that season, the Logan Bros’ MOANA. You can also view/read an excellent article on Ida by Harold in the November issue of Boating NZ (pages 148>151), on sale now.

Interested parties can contact Catherine Shirley  cathshirley@gmail.com

You can read more about Ida here.

https://waitematawoodys.com/2016/05/15/ida-sailing-sunday-more/

UPDATE: Photos below ex Harold Kidd of IDA hauled out at Noakes yard in Sydney last week.

P1020432

Seacraft Woodys

054

058

052

001

003

SEACRAFT WOODYS

I was recently contacted by Chris Laird & his first words were “are you guys interested in small woodys?”. My answer was ‘if its wood, its good’ 🙂

The above photographs show two dinghies that Chris restored  a couple of years ago. The 12ft 6in Seacraft Tuna has been stripped back and had new rib sections, one or two splines to cracked planks, seats, foredeck trim and beltings before being painted up to original Seacraft colours with original badging.

The varnished 12’6″ Brin Wilson has been stripped back, seats  etc removed, some rib sections scarfed in, several splines to cracked planks and varnished / painted up to original colours.
Chris commented that it is a lovely boat to row.

Also included are photos of a 6hp Norman and original cone clutch that is in a 16′ Seacraft cabin boat that Chris is currently rebuilding. I have asked Chris to send in photos of that project.

OOPS THAT IS EMBARRASSING
Over the Anzac weekend a lot of the classic fleet headed north to Kawau Island. Anchoring room near the Kawau Boating Club is always at a premium on long weekends & no one likes a long row in the dark……….. but even the old salts can get it wrong – the crew on the  1905, Logan Bros, ex pilot boat ‘Ferro’ must have been in a hurry to make the KBC as they anchored rather close in. As it turned out, too close in – the below photo was 1/2hr before low tide & mid Sunday morning – would have been a long / embarrassing day waiting for the tide 😉

Ferro @ Kawau April2017

Queenie – Whangaroa Harbour

p1090755

p1090754

Queenie On The Whangaroa Harbour

Woody Robin Elliott sent in the above photos of Queenie sailing on the Whangaroa Harbour over the xmas / ny period. Queenie was built by Logan Bros & launched January 1904 for James Kirker.  She is a ’25-foor Linear Rater’.  Her current owners are Henry and Theresa Roberts of Whangaroa.

REMEMBER AUCKLAND ANNIVERSARY DAY REGATTA TOMORROW, GET OUT & ENJOY IT. ON THE WATER OR FROM ONE OF THE MANY VANTAGE POINTS 🙂

A Call For Help

hauiti-about-ot-be-manurere-tauranga-1929-3

HAUITI – 1929

A Call For Help

I was recently contacted by John Ellingham, a kiwi now residing in country Western Australia. Johns inquiry centered on two little ships (Iranui & Hauiti) that were built in Auckland in the early 1900’s. Johns interest is mainly on Hauiti, because of a family link. This Grand father Alf Hassall was a shareholder in this vessel with Faulkners and was killed aboard her off Whakatane in 1931.
John has researched as many avenues as he can but I would like the gaps filled.
Any photos of the Hauiti / Manurere / Morocotcha / Three Kings would be appreciated.

hauiti-about-ot-be-manurere-tauranga-1929-2

HAUITI – 1929

HAUITI / MANURERE / MOROCOTCHA / THREE KINGS

Built 1906, possibly by Logan Bros, for  either the Tolaga Bay Lightering Co., Gisborne Sheep Farmers Company or Messer’s Glover Lockwood and Holder.

Length 47.75′ x 11.75′ x 3.66′ with a 21.32 Gross Tonnage / 5.92 Reg Tonnage. Originally Powered by two Standard Frisco petrol engines each 24 BHP. Used as lighter for transporting wool bales to vessels anchored off shore. Sister ship to “Iranui”

Sold in 1929, according to reports by the Gisborne Sheep Farmer’s Company Ltd to Barley & George Falkner and Albert Edward Hassall of Tauranga -‘Mount Ferry Co’ & renamed – Manurere. Converted from cargo vessel to passenger. Only made one trip found unsuitable. Converted to (a) Seine boat. (b) Trawler depending on which report you believe. Re engined with twin Gardner Diesels.

First registered 1932 – ID 153993 – 13/1932 – 06/12/1932  Port of Auckland (IR). Registered to Esther May Hassall (John Ellingham’s Grand Mother, John’s  Grand Father was killed on board Manurere off Whakatane on 29/03/31, dragged into winch by coat tails).

Sold again in 1933 to Mrs Bertha Robinson Auckland & renamed Morocotcha. Possible engine change 03/01/1934

Sold again in 1937 to McFarlanes Fisheries  (mussel / oyster farmers ) & renamed Three Kings. Reg  AK 516    06/03/1937

Registry closed 17/05/1948 – Believed to have foundered in Firth Thames with wreck located 15/12/62. Salvaged by Bert Subritzky 16>30 December 1962. Engines salvaged, hull scrapped.

iranui

IRANUI

IRANUI

Built  1900 possibly by Logan Bros, Auckland for a Mr Glover of Tolago Bay. Delivered to Tolago Bay as deck cargo aboard “Flora” 23 October 1900. Records also show the ownership as Glover Lockwood and Holder. Later articles refer to “Iranui” being owned by the Gisborne Sheep Farmers Company. The full title of this company was Gisborne Sheep farmers Frozen meat and Mercantile Co who had a store in Tolaga Bay.

Her use was as a Wool Lighter and Towing. Mainly out from the Uawa River to larger vessels anchored off shore. She measured 42 ft O/A – 10ft beam – Draft 2ft 3 inches aft  Carried 10 – 15 tons cargo under hatches. Power came from a 10hp Union Oil engine ( Supplied by Messers Ryan & Co)

The last known reference to “Iranui” is in 1918 (Papers Past Poverty Bay Herald 6 May 1918) where it is reported that she had been slipped at Gisborne and was returning to Tolago Bay.

NOTE: This “Iranui”  is not to be confused with the vessel “Settler” wrecked at Tairua. Confusion arises via the article ex NZ Museums web site reference Kelvin engine gifted by David James Mays Mason with comment by Daniel Hicks “MV Settler was ex “Iranui ex “SS Settler“ build 1905 by C. Bailey Jnr Auckland.

Moerangi

Moerangi 1

MOERANGI
photos & story from NZ Life & Leisure magazine

Today we feature the Logan Bros ex work boat Moerangi. When launched in 1901 she was schooner rigged & also had one of the first oil engines in New Zealand.
Built for Archibald Weir Jnr. she started her working life towing the commercial fishing fleet in & out of Moeraki, as the fleet started installing engines her role became redundant & she became a passenger ferry with the Peninsular Ferry co. in Otago. Around 1920 she was converted back to a fishing boat & moved around several ports – Port Chalmers > Lyttlelton > Akaroa. Her past is a lille cloudy after 1920 until the early 1980’s when she was converted to a pleasure craft. Her owners Alice & Mick Sinclair would love to know more about the ‘missing’ years.
ww has a great relationship with the crew at NZ Life & Leisure magazine, the #1 selling magazine in its field & we thank them for sharing this story with ww readers. You can find out more about the magazine here    http://nzlifeandleisure.co.nz/

More details & photos on Moerangi’s past here https://waitematawoodys.com/2014/12/15/moerangi/

 

Moerangi 2

Moerangi 3

Moerangi 4

Moerangi 5

Moerangi 6

Moerangi 7

Kotiri B20 – Sailing Sunday

KOTIRI B20 – Sailing Sunday

Today’s post is an amazing story – firstly Nathan Herbert tipped me off that a 1897 Logan yacht was in a boat shed in the Auckland suburb of Herne Bay & had not seen the light of day (or water) for over 30 years. Next thing I’m on a RIB at Westhaven with the son (Don Webster) & grandson (Nick Webster) of the gent (Blair Webster) that purchased Kotiri back in 1947 & locked the boat shed doors sometime c.1986 & we were heading around to Herne Bay to view the ‘extraction’ of Kotiri from her boat shed. We were joined by Don’s younger brother Charles & a film crew from TV3 that were filming the event as part of an upcoming (semi-related) progamme. The day was a big boys dream – tug boats, barges, cranes, old shed full of cool stuff & the odd yummy mummy watching from the beach 🙂
It was a treat to watch a team of pro’s doing something that is beyond what most of us could do.
Some details on Kotiri – LOA 40′, LWL 28′, Beam 8’6″

Also in the shed was very cute dinghy / runabout that will be a winter project for Nick.

Below is some history on Kotiri & how she came to be sitting on a Boat Haulage transporter on-route to Peter Brookes yard.

Details below & photos above ex Classic Yacht Charitable Trust

Kotiri was designed and built by Logan Brothers in 1897 (launched 18th October 1897) at the height of the boat design and racing rivalry period between the Logans and the Bailey Brothers. The Baileys launched Meteor in the same month, both boats being built to the 30ft linear rating of the time.

Kotiri passed through many owners, including a period in Wellington, where she was renamed Kotiri II to differentiate from a smaller 30 footer of the same name. She was owned for a time by Laurence “Bruce” McCallum, the son of R H McCallum of Marine Parade Devonport who owned the family business Winate and Co based in lower Queen Street opposite the Central Post Office. Bruce MCCallum died in a bomber crash over Belgium on a mission to Cologne in 1943. The McCallum’s won the Devonport Yacht Club’s Duder cup in 1941 & 1942. The trophy is still held by a family member Tom McCallum of Pakuranga. Tom is also caretaker for another small trophy inscribed “RNZYS Kotiri 1939”.

Kotiri was purchased by Blair Daniel Webster in 1947 who converted her to marconi rig c1949. She was still sailing in 1952 but Blair layed her up in his boat shed at at 75 Sarsfield St Herne Bay in 1953 as her decks were leaking badly. In 1961 Blair commissioned R L (Bob) Stewart to draw up plans for conversion to a K class. From 1962 to 1968 Blair, with his closest friend J S G (Jock) McLanachan and a boat builder Jim Dennerley of Coxes Creek, worked on the comversion by increasing the height of the freeboard by 3 planks (approx. 9 inches); fully rib her; add new Bob Stewart “Patiki” style coamings; cut off rotten counter stern and build tuck. Boat shed ramp and railway tracks were laid for her ultimate return to the water. In November 1968 Kotiri was relaunched and moored on pile moorings at Westhaven. A second masthead rig and used sails were subsequently purchased. The boat shed at Herne Bay was regularly used for cleaning and antifouling haulouts. Kotiri sailed on rare occasions over the following years. Circa 1985 she sailed in a Classic Yacht regatta and by the late 80’s she had “retired” to the boat shed.

Blair Webster passed away on the 16th August 2000 and left Kotiri to his eldest son Donald. After 66 years ownership in the Webster family Kotiri was gifted to the Classic Yacht Charitable Trust on 14th March 2013 by Donald Webster. The token sum of 20 cents passed hands, for which 10 cents “change” was given, to mark the change of ownership.

Having been stored in a sound shed, over water, with good airflow, her hull was preserved in exceptionaly good order.

The Classic Yacht Charitable Trust are looking to raise funds to restore Kotiri to original sailing condition and preserve her for the long term enjoyment of New Zealander’s.

UPDATE 13-01-2019
WW has been contacted by Lesley Brennan those father, Lex Dowling, owned Kotiri in the mid 1960’s.
If anyone now related to the yacht would like the photo below – contact Lesley via email
alesley@actrix.co.nz
kotiri photo

Ethel

ETHEL
Info below ex Capt. Tom Leary    B.V.A. (Syd.)  C.L.M.  N.Z.W.G. – sent in by Judith Gardiner (+ b/w photos). Colour photos ex Alan H
Designed and built by the Logan Brothers at their Devonport shipyards in 1896 (Nov 16th) for H. Dawson the owner of Greater Mercury Island. She was 60′ LOA, 11’8″ beam & 5’8 draft. Triple skin kauri & copper roved. Ethel was built as a family cruiser/ racer with slightly more beam than those of her contemporaries. Ethel spent her early years cruising and racing mainly around Auckland but also in Wellington.

Around 1918 Ethel was taken along with other larger vessels into the snapper fleet and given the sail # 33. After the war years she moved to Waitara on New Zealand’s West coast where she remained for fifty years long lining for snapper, it was during this time she had an engine fitted. Whilst in Waitara where she had her own wharf, she was called by the locals ‘The Queen of Waitara.’

About 1970 she returned to Auckland and continued to fish out of Westhaven.

In approx. 1975 she was purchased by John Smith from Thames who did extensive restoration work including new decks new cabin, new interior work and restored her original yawl rig as the mizzen mast had been removed for fishing.

In 1999 I purchased Ethel from John and again an extensive refit began.

Half of her port side was replaced due to dry rot. New fuel tanks, a recond. engine was fitted, new electronics/ wiring including smart charging systems, electronic toilet  and fridge installed she was completely recaulked including scarfing in slithers to her garboard plank. All this work was done under the guidance of Nortel surveyors. 2003 saw more work done during a winter refit her coach roof was glassed over, her main mast and gaff had another two meters added to them to take her back to her original rig. Her cockpit area was increased with self drainage this was done to take six to eight people comfortably. Wheel steering was added and her decks were recaulked with sika. A yard was added and new sails cut to fit. All Ethel’s standing rig is new galv. most of Ethel’s running rig is also new. Ethel is a very well appointed and maintained classic and has been chartering successfully for the past three years.

The Auckland museum has many early photographs of Ethel, as with today, she is a much admired and photographed yacht.

Alan H – Ethel is now owned by Keith Munro & has again undergone an extensive refit & you will see from the photos below is looking rather smart.

Info ex Judith Gardiner on Ethel’s first owner – Herbert Dawson, who was Judith’s great grand uncle through her mothers line.

Herbert Dawson was born 19 April 1859 In Leeds Yorkshire. He married Jane Eleanor Darrell  on 29 December 1886 in Hutton Buscel East Yorkshire & they had two children –
Ethel Fanny Dawson
Born: 14.11.1887 – Lebberston, Filey, Scarborough

Eleanor Sybil Dawson
Born: 03.05.1889 – Falsgrave, Scarborough

Herbert, Jane, Ethel and Eleanor (known as Sybil)  emigrated to New Zealand and landed at Port Chalmers.  They had sailed on the ship Tainui which had left London on 12 May 1892. Herbert purchased Great Mercury on 02.10.1893. Herbert sold Great Mercury Island on 26.02.1912 to John Kemp of Epsom and Frederick William Kemp of Tauranga.

Herbert contracted Logan Brothers of Devonport shipyards to build a ‘boat’ to accommodate his need to transport to and from Great Mercury Island.  It was launched on 16 November 1896.  It was probably sold within the year that Herbert left Great Mercury Island.

Judith would very much like to know who owned it after Tom Leary any other information would be appreciated.

Herbert & Jane Dawson

Herbert Dawson Jane Eleanor Darrell

Rawhiti – A Once In Your Life Time Opportunity

Rawhiti – A Once In Your Life Time Opportunity
photos ex Classic Boat, Chris Miller, Alan H & owner

Firstly – a challenge – can anyone dispute that Rawhiti is New Zealand’s finest classic yacht afloat? From all angles she is simply beautiful, a true classic from the drawing board of Arch Logan & built by Logan Bros.
Rawhiti was completely rebuilt by Peter Brookes at Brookes Boatbuilders in 2011. For her owner Greg Lee, it was a pure labour of love, he extensively researched every aspect of the project & worked alongside Peter on a daily basis, the end result being a Logan that is better than launch day in October 1906 & thats pretty bold statement to make about a Logan.

Yachts like Rawhiti only come along once in a life time, to get the chance to buy one is even rarer. That opportunity now exists, to do that – to own this beautiful piece of New Zealand’s maritime heritage, a floating work of art.

So my 2nd challenge today is to all classic boating aficionados – gather your friends or business associates & form a syndicate, sell that bloody ugly Colin McCahn, sell a few shares, sub-divide that section – do what ever you have to do, to put the money together to acquire Rawhiti.

Interested? – read on

Without boring you with details, Rawhiti’s owner is serious about selling her & now via another business transaction has the opportunity to offer Rawhiti for sale to the right owner for a fractional of the restoration cost i.e. in the $400k range.
The time window in which the business transaction is available is short and therefore there is a limit to how long Rawhiti will be marketed in this price range. If you are interested in discussing the sale, please initially, contact the owner Greg Lee on the email address below.
For anyone with an interest in acquiring Rawhiti who is unsure what they might be doing with her in the short term (but wishing to secure the opportunity to acquire her now), her owner has had provisional discussions with Peter Brookes about storing her under cover at his yard at favourable rates.

Owner email contact:       greg-lee@xtra.co.nz

Celox SOS

CELOX – SOS      (Sailing Sunday)

photos from Harold Kidd + historical info. Salvage details ex Pam Cundy
1921 incident reporting ex paperpast

The 26′, 107 year old Logan Bros built classic mullet boat Celox sank last week while sailing from Opua to the Cavalli Islands.  She struck rocks off Motukawaiti Island.  Luckily her owner was rescued, but unfortunately Celox did not fare as well & while re-floated & dragged ashore, she is now in two pieces, the cabin & the deck have separated from the hull. The mast is intact & has been removed.
The owner shall have assistance with getting her back to Opua, but is feeling defeated at this point is offering her to anyone wanting to restore her.

Some history ex Harold Kidd
CELOX was built by Logan Bros (not by Arch Logan) in November 1908 for Tom Percy of Parnell. She had an illustrious racing history for many years.
Sadly this is not the first time she has sunk, in March 1921 she drove under while carrying her spinnaker sheet to weather (as was the rule at the time) between Motihe and Matiatia. Boatbuilder Dale Spencer owned her at the time. His 8 year old boy was trapped in the cabin and went down with the boat. Two boats were on the scene and sent out dinghies which got to the rest of the crew but, when Dale heard his son had gone, he refused to be hauled aboard the dinghy and sank.
She has been at Matauwhi Bay and thereabouts for 40 years or so.

Moerangi

MOERANGI

Moerangi is a 1901 Logan Bros 55’ 9” trawler style classic launch that spent most of her life as a fishing boat and ferry before undergoing 2 separate restorations the last in Whangarei costing I understand over $300,000.

Being royalty i.e. a genuine Logan, she has a wonderfully documented pedigree of ownership and escapades detailing her life over the last 113 years, which makes my life very easy when doing a ww post. Click the (blue) links below to view/read. Built in the Logan style triple skin heart kauri she has been restored by the expert shipwrights of The Wood Shed in Whangarei who obtained suitable heart kauri and replaced in the traditional manner all that was required, its interesting reading & you can see where the $300k went.

Powered by a 1950 Gardner 5L3 reconditioned in 1986 she has traveled approx 500 hours since and cruises 7-8kts at 750 rpm using approx 8 liters per hour. Accommodation is in 2 double staterooms forward with ensuite and aft plus 2 single berths. The wheelhouse has a large saloon and dining area, aft galley with 2 burner stove grill & oven, 3 way electric fridge, pressure H&C water, 1 heads and a separate full size shower. Electronics VHF, autopilot, GPS radar, depth-sounder & TV/DVD.

Moerangi is for sale (sales brochure below) & this really is one of those situations where someone can ‘profit’ at the expense of someone else e.g. all the money has been spent & the work done to sympathetically modernize this unique classic motor launch while retaining her graceful lines. Her next owner gets to enjoy the vessel without all the hard work & I’m sure at a discount to what was actually invested in her restoration.
If you looking for a true classic motor launch, contact Charles Clark Ph 09 428 3287 or Mob 021 248 4591.

Sales brochure 1901 Logan Launch

Older photos

 

Akaroa Mail article 15/1/1988 click to enlarge

October 2014 ‘The Wood Shed’ shipwright work summary / report link Shipwright report October 2014 (2 pages)

Boating NZ Oct 2007 feature link Boating NZ Oct 2007 Article (5 pages)

Ownership history link Some Ownership history

 

 

Severn

SEVERN

photo from  Paul Drake, details ex Harold Kidd

Severn (actually in the Register of British Ships and RNZYS records as The Severn), shown in the above photo at Three Mile Bay, Taupo where she resides,  was built by Logan Bros for Colonel G. Arnold Ward of Tauranga and launched in March 1910 when she steamed down to Tauranga. The event was reported in the Bay of Plenty Times of 18/3/1910. She originally had an 8hp (rated) 2 cylinder Union engine, a make much favoured by the Logans because of its simplicity and reliability. Ward sold her to H J Day of Tauranga in 1922. Day sold her to B. Sladden of Tauranga in 1925; Sladden had her until 1947 when a half share was bought by P D Simmonds.

Harold has pics of her at Tauranga in the 30s when Charlie Millett worked on her.

In 1964 she was still in Tauranga owned by D W Reid and fitted with a 4 cylinder Graymarine.

Mike Leonard owned her at Whangamata in 1994 when I had extensive correspondence with him. I photographed her on Taupo in 2008.

This launch is super-easy to track as she was a British Registered Ship until relatively recently plus most of the owners were Squadron members and reported any changes of ownership and engine.