Wooden Boat Yard Visit – 50 Photos

New Zealand Wooden Boat Yard Visit – 50 Photos

Yesterday afternoon, Auckland based woodys got to rub shoulders with an impressive collection of classic wooden boats at one of New Zealand’s leading wooden boat yards – the Peter Brookes ‘Brookes Boatbuilders’ complex in rural Waimauku, West Auckland. I have been privileged to visit numerous times but every visit is a treat, where else would you see over eight classic yachts and launches in varying stages of restorations.


I’ll let the photos tell the story, if I have a photo mixed up, let me know 🙂 – enjoy – remember as always if you click on the photos they will enlarge 😉


Amakura II – 1936 Colin Wild, 52’ Bridgedecker


Impala – 1960 Fife, Teak planking 


Matia A23 – 1939 Lidgard, 50’, triple skinned kauri


Kenya II – 1940 Lidgard, 50’, triple skinned kauri. Gardner 6LXB


Pilot Cutter – 50’ 


Kotiri – 1897 Logan


Ladye Wilma B26 – 1895 Logan Bros, 43’, triple skinned kauri


Katrina II K100 – 1944 Bob Stewart, K-Class

28 Days On Board Waitangi – Auckland > Sydney

28 Days On Board Waitangi – Auckland > Sydney


Hopefully today will be the last day of lockdown at L3 for Aucklanders, so should therefore be the last day of ‘staying-close-to-home’.

A perfect excuse to view this great video from the Royal Akarana Yacht Club, the club are approaching their 125th anniversary and have come up with a cool idea, under the umbrella ‘Club Conversations – Unplugged’- today we get to meet club member Peter Oldham QSM, and hear the story of his passage aboard the classic yacht Waitangi, on her 28 day journey from Auckland to Sydney in 1949 + a peek into his life story.
Enjoy 🙂

Peter Oldham QSM

RSVP via the form below

Log of The Rawhiti – bringing her home – Sydney to Auckland Passage

LOG of The RAWHITI – 1947 Sydney > Auckland Passage

The log is reproduced below via the generosity of the Mahurangi cruising club, who ran an abridged version in the 2020 year book. Click link below to read/view – its a cool story, enjoy

The Log of the Rawhiti

Today’s WW story is an amazing account of the return of the 1905 Arch Logan designed, Logan Bros built yacht – Rawhiti from Sydney, Australia to its place off birth – Auckland, New Zealand.

Almost immediately after her 1905 launch Rawhiti headed off across the Tasman to Sydney where she spent the next 41 years. Sadly the last 10 of those years saw her laid up on the hard, rapidly deteriorating.

Luckily for the yacht and all classic boaters in New Zealand, Sydney Ernest Marler (Hek to most) entered the scene and purchased Rawhiti and immediately made plans to sail her back to NZ. Some rather questionable repairs were undertaken and she set sail on December 17th 1947. Her crew for the passage was Hek + Peter Henley (navigator) Brian Lane (shipwright) Roy Johnson (bos’n and ships ‘surgeon’) Norman Vickery (signaller and radio operator)

The passage was recorded in the form of a ships log, written by Hek to his father Hank ((Henry Maitland Marler) outlining the voyage and the crew’s experiences. The trip took 11 days, said to be a record passage from Sydney to Russell, Bay of Islands, that was unbeaten until the 1970’s. 36 hours of the 11 days saw the yacht becalmed, so woodys she was greyhound 🙂

It would be an understatement to say it was a pleasant passage – Brian Lane is on record saying that they were very lucky, if the weather had got any worse they wouldn’t have made it, Rawhiti was hopeless at laying up into the wind. But very fast, built to race on the Waitemata Harbour not ocean passages. At times they trailed anything spare off the stern in an attempt to slow her down. Brian constantly thought she would split in two when coming down off a wave, no splash just a crash that Brian described as like being dropped off the back of a truck onto a concrete road. If he had known the yachts condition and blue water abilities, he would not have ventured past Sydney heads – but they did and Hek went on to raise a family with salt very much in their veins. Son Bruce and grandson Rod continuing the families association with wooden sailing craft.

In the mid 2000’s Rawhiti underwent a total rebuild / restoration while in the ownership of Greg Lee, Greg and master wooden boat builder Peter Brookes conducted the 7 year restoration. Without a doubt she is New Zealand’s finest restoration of a classic wooden vessel. If you search Rawhiti in the WW search box you will get an insight into the restoration.

I bet her crew on the passage back to Auckland in 1947 would not have imaged that 73 years later she would still be sailing and commanding a prime spot  on the world classic wooden boat stage. One of the worlds most admired (&selling) wooden boating items is the Calendar of Wooden Boats by Benjamin Mendlowitz and Maynard Bray. Rawhiti is centre stage in the 2021 edition for the month of March. As are two of our launches – Jason Prew’s – My Girl (April) and Peter Boardman’s – Lady Margaret (June). Owning 25% of that real estate is pretty good for little old NZ, but it comes at a price and that price is all the time that a small bunch of woodys put in making Ben and Maynard so welcome in NZ.

Copies of the 2021 edition are available at

 https://www.woodenboatscalendar.com/wooden-boats-calendar.html 

 

 

Huria > Vanora > Naomi

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HURIA > VANORA > NAOMI

This photo ex Williamson Family Collection, recently popped up on fb and thanks to Harold Kidd we now know a lot more about the vessel.

She was built as – Huria in Jan. 1899 by Logan Bros. for Capt. Mercer of Nelson with a 2 cyl Daimler engine.
She was bought by MA Jenny in1905 and re-named – Vanora. Jenny re-engined her with a 30hp Gardner. Lindsay Cooke (Auckland) bought her in 1906. The NZ Government bought her in 1914 and based her in Tauranga. She got renamed – Naomi, probably because Jenny had owned a succession of Naomis. As Vanora, she took part in the Rudder Cup race in 1908.          
Interested to hear what others think re the year of the above photo -there are some very ’sad’ apparel on display. The gent in the yellow budgie smugglers would have to win the prize for the most outrageous  kit.
Sadly as we see in the photo below, ex Daniel HIcks fb, Naomi has not travelled well over the years and now languishes on the hard at Whangateau. It’s the same woody but somewhere along the way, she has been let go.
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Arita > Edna White

 

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AUTA   Arita > Edna White

Today’s photo of Auta is dated 1916 but I’m not sure if that’s the build date or when the photos taken.
Photo comes to us via Lew Redwood’s fb.
Anyone know the provenance of Auta and where she is today?
Harold Kidd Input – That’s a nice pic of ARITA (not AUTA) built by Logan Bros in April 1909 for R.O. Clark of the brickworks at Hobsonville. She was later rebuilt and renamed EDNA WHITE and used as a ferry on the run to Kohimarama. She was totally burnt out in 1927. I’m sure she has appeared in WW before as either ARITA or EDNA WHITE.
She did Harold – link below 🙂




https://waitematawoodys.com/2018/10/09/arita/

Something Completely Left Field
Adrian Pawson is a very talented, clever lad – works with Southern Spars on high end tech projects but his pleasure interests go from restoring VW Combis, Seagull (outboard) racing to ‘turbo charging’ (carbon fibre everything) Townson sailing dinghies.
Arian recently acquired a light weather foil off one of the Oracle AC50 boats – cost new $250,000+ . So too good to bin it, so its been re-born as a swing in his garden. I understand there is 2 ton of concrete under the purpose built carbon mounting bracket.Check out the 316ss bolts – those alone would blow my budget 🙂
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Naomi (Huria > Vanora) + John Street taking about the steam crane Rapaki

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NAOMI – Huria > Vanora

One of WW spotters, Shane  Anderson was driving thru Whangateau this week and spotted a woody parked up on a yard in the middle of a major restoration.
Turns out the 45’ launch is named Naomi (see interior carving photo) – the boatbuilder – Josh, working on her believes there may have been a name change in the past, but if so, a long time ago – the skylights have Naomi sandblasted on them. There is talk of her possibly being a Logan and even originally steam powered. Also talk of a 1897 build date. Her name board records her builder as Chas. Bailey. Investigation shows the existence of 3 sets of engine beds.
There also appears to be old repairs to both sides of the boat.
Her current owner has had her for 20 years, kept in dry storage in West Auckland.
A suggestion – in a previous WW story (link below) on a launch named Naomi III, Harold Kidd spoke of the original Naomi (I) being built in March 1902 and Naomi II in November 1902, both by Chas. Bailey Jnr and both for M.A. Jenny of Nelson. Could the above launch be one of these boats?
Input from Harold Kidd – The story is unbelievably complex; the NAOMI bit is the result of an assumption on someone’s part, many years ago, that any launch owned by M A Jenny of Nelson and Auckland was a NAOMI. This launch seems to have started life as the oil launch HURIA (twin 2 cylinder Daimler petrol engines) built by Logan Bros in January 1899 for Capt Mercer of Nelson as a trader, bought by Jenny in 1905, fitted with a 30hp Gardner in Wellington and rechristened VANORA. In 1907 Jenny sold her to Lindsay Cooke of Auckland who got Chas Bailey Jr to refit her for cruising. She took part in the 1908 RNZYS Rudder Cup race around Sail Rock.
Need several pages more to bring her up to date.
In summary, the current name and builder carved into her is bs.

JOHN STREET – ONE MAN’S TREASURES VIDEO SERIES – Part 5

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Every day this week WW we are featuring a video filmed at John’s recent speaking engagement at the New Zealand Maritime Museum. The language is a tad ‘blue’ in places, but thats how John rolls 🙂 NOTE VIDEO IS COPYRIGHT DO NOT DOWNLOAD WITHOUT PERMISSION. Videos edited & enhanced with the help of Andrew Christie. 
PART Five – The Steam Crane Rapaki (turn your sound up)

UPCOMING VIDEOS
MONDAY–         Fosters The Beginning
TUESDAY–        History of The Breeze
WEDNESDAY– The schooner Daring
THURSDAY–     Amercias Cup
FRIDAY –            The steam crane ship Rapaki
SATURDAY–      Tug Boat Racing on the Waitemata
 

Arita

Arita

ARITA

Todays photo is ex Lew Redwood / NZ cars, boats……. FB page. (Originally ex Auckland Museum, Winkleman collection). It shows the 1909 Logan Bros built launch Arita, seen here in the Bay of Islands
Zoom zoom was via twin 15-20hp 2 cylinder Kelvins.
Details ex Harold Kidd.
Do we know what became of Arita?

Harold Kidd Input – ARITA had a sad end. She was a double tunnel hull 48 footer with twin 15-20hp 2 cylinder Kelvins built for R.O. Clark & Co of Birkenhead by Logan Bros in April1909 but sold to H H Adams in June 1910 to replace ELIZA (now KUMI). Adams owned Moturoa Island in the Bay of Islands so this is where the pic was taken. She was active in NZPBA races and events until Adams sold her in 1919 to Charles Hansen (later of Moturekareka) who renamed her WAIOURU.
She reverted to ARITA for a while until Capt. G H White bought her in 1924 and rebuilt her for carrying 94 passengers on the run to St Heliers, Kohimarama, Orakei and Beachlands. A 45hp 4 cylinder heavy duty Gardner costing 500 pounds was fitted. He renamed her EDNA WHITE.
On 30th April 1927 she caught fire, was beached and burnt out at Kohimarama.She was valued at 3000 pounds, an enormous sum at the time.
All the buffs who rely on the Register of British Ships for source material say she was built in 1912 by Arch Logan because that’s what Capt White put down on the registration form in 1924. Maybe he thought “Arch Logan” carried more weight than “Logan Bros” and “1912” was preferable to “1909” or maybe he was just wrong/careless. I’ll bet on the latter, but this is how bunkum becomes history.
Here endeth the lesson………..

PS Note the “conning tower” control position right forward on the coachroof, an early move towards the bridgedecker.

 

 

Karoro

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KARORO

Another photo bought to us via Lew Redwood’s FB postings – this time the Karoro, the Logan Bros built launch.

In the above photo we see her just after her launching on 21st February 1906.

If I have the facts right & she is the same bought – Harold Kidd has previously commented that Karoro went north to Whangarei in 1916 as a passenger launch owned by H H Jagger of Taurikura and had a name change to TUNA around 1932 when she was sold to the Thames (HDK – correct?)

Anyone able to comment on what became of her?

Harold Kidd Input – Like most launches she had a complex history, name changes etc. She was in Whangarei from 1916-1921, then to Gisborne 1921-1925, back to Whangarei, back to Gisborne 1928-1932 then Thames then to Auckland in 1934 to be sold by auction in a mortgagee sale on 13th July 1934 as TUNA, bought by J J Craig then sold to A.E. Hite. I think she might have been the fishing boat TUNA that reported a floating mine off Coromandel in late January 1941 owned by N. E Owens of Auckland, but there were many TUNAs.

 

Maxie

MAXIE

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MAXIE

Greg Noble sent me the above stunning photos of Maxie; Logan Bros built the launch in 1903. These photos mostly show her in The Sounds. Greg’s granddad owned Maxie through the 1920’s. In recent times, Greg has seen her on Lake Taupo, with topsides reworked by Bruce Askew.

Now here is where the story gets a little unusual – Greg’s interest these days in the launch, is only as a working boat, not a cruiser. He has set his sights on building her anew, with original hull and sheerline, open fore and aft of a small doghouse, somewhere between what she had and that of Matareka 1 (her sister). None of the mod cons, oiled timbers rather than varnished, a tiller rather than a wheel and an electric power train and batteries stored in-line with her keel below waterline. He wants to build her on the grass 10m from the shore and in a very traditional and economic way. He has native timbers at hand: pohutakawa for her prow, keel, stern and gunwales and kauri for her splashboard and fore and aft decks, doghouse and floorboards.

However, Greg wants to have her hull delivered in two pre-made fiberglass pieces which he will fit either side of her spine. The whole job done in 3 months start to finish for two (older) men – Greg, a very hands on architect and his brother, a life long sailor.

Greg is seeking help / advice from the WW brains trust – he would like to talk this built concept through with some of your wiser members. He is thinking of guys who know the timbers well but in particular, needs help in confirming the exact dimensions of her hull – could any original drawings exist? He has sent a message to Bruce Askew who might have measured and drawn her in the early 1990’s. Any advice & leads would be much appreciated.

Input from Greg Noble“Yes, two boats appeared in Alan’s original article – both sets of photos are from my grand dad’s journal and I thought it opportune to share with WW at the same time. Of the two, the Maxie was my grand dad’s boat (Perceval Noble), my dad often talked of her and my aunt most recently recalled her being mored in the lower reaches of the Hutt River, close to Percy’s home, so she must have crossed the straight many times. Maxie is the sister to Matareka 1, both Logan, 1903. I have looked at her in Taupo and am delighted to see her alive and loved, but also frustrated that she has moved on and gone “up in the world” and is beyond any possibility of a return to her routes a working boat. By way of explanation for what might seem to most – madness, I believe the world is losing control of growth and that we all need to step back and refocus on a what is immediately around us. I find that I cant discuss this without an overwhelming negativity descending on both preacher and listener. So, I have set my mind to doing it – using traditional processes, local materials and skills together with the appropriate modern technologies in a creative and positive way that will serve a regenerating local environment and need. So, for anybody who dares to open the discussion with me, I promise to focus entirely on the creative task ahead, and I will spare you the drudgery of knowing the reasons why. Fingers crossed and thank you the air time”.

16-02-2018 Input from Ray Morey

MAXIE got an 8 page write-up in the “Wooden boat magazine” August 1995 no.125 story by Peter Freeman. There are some beautiful photo’s in there too.
Greg Noble, your concept has been done here where I live in Sth.East Queensland Australia. The boat concerned was built around 1900 and used to tow log rafts and later, log barges before becoming a fishing boat. The owner built an outside skeleton then stripped the inside, all ribs framing and such then used the hull as a female mold and layered up a fibre glass skin. He retained the original backbone, stem-keel deadwood and stern post. The power unit is a 110 hp. Iveco Fiat with 2:1 red. She is ready to go in the water now but the owner has health issues and probably won’t finish her. Photos below

Rawhiti – Revisited

So far there have been over 2,000 classic wooden boat stories featured on waitematawoodys & the viewing numbers (3,300,000) have grown from a dozen people to over 80,000, I have had some loyalists from day one but the big numbers have happened in the last 2 years – so not everyone will have been exposed to all the stories. Over the Christmas / NY period I have decided to take a peek back in time & feature some of the gems from the early days. Enjoy.

Have a great holiday & remember to take the camera / phone with you & snap a photo of any woodys you see. Email them to waitematawoodys@gmail.com

 

Rawhiti – A Once In Your Life Time Opportunity
photos ex Classic Boat, Chris Miller, Alan H & owner

Firstly – a challenge – can anyone dispute that Rawhiti is New Zealand’s finest classic yacht afloat? From all angles she is simply beautiful, a true classic from the drawing board of Arch Logan & built by Logan Bros.
Rawhiti was completely rebuilt by Peter Brookes at Brookes Boatbuilders in 2011. For her owner Greg Lee, it was a pure labour of love, he extensively researched every aspect of the project & worked alongside Peter on a daily basis, the end result being a Logan that is better than launch day in October 1906 & thats pretty bold statement to make about a Logan.

Yachts like Rawhiti only come along once in a life time, to get the chance to buy one is even rarer. That opportunity now exists, to do that – to own this beautiful piece of New Zealand’s maritime heritage, a floating work of art.

So my 2nd challenge today is to all classic boating aficionados – gather your friends or business associates & form a syndicate, sell that bloody ugly Colin McCahn, sell a few shares, sub-divide that section – do what ever you have to do, to put the money together to acquire Rawhiti.

Interested? – read on

Without boring you with details, Rawhiti’s owner is serious about selling her & now via another business transaction has the opportunity to offer Rawhiti for sale to the right owner for a fractional of the restoration cost i.e. in the $400k range.
The time window in which the business transaction is available is short and therefore there is a limit to how long Rawhiti will be marketed in this price range. If you are interested in discussing the sale, please initially, contact the owner Greg Lee on the email address below.
For anyone with an interest in acquiring Rawhiti who is unsure what they might be doing with her in the short term (but wishing to secure the opportunity to acquire her now), her owner has had provisional discussions with Peter Brookes about storing her under cover at his yard at favourable rates.

Owner email contact:       greg-lee@xtra.co.nz

Update 29-09-2019 Below is a  sneak peek at Rawhiti when she was in Australia – the photo appeared in the Sept 1925 edition of the ‘Australian Motor Boating and Yachting Monthly. Sent in by Andrew Christie.

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