About Alan Houghton - waitematawoodys.com founder

What is Waitemata Woodys all about? We provide a meeting point for owners and devotees of classic wooden boat. We seek to capture the growing interest in old wooden boats and to encourage and bring together all those friendly people who are interested in the preservation of classic wooden vessels for whatever reason, be it their own lifestyle, passion for old boats or just their view of the world. We encourage the exchange of knowledge about the care and restoration of these old boats, and we facilitate gatherings of classic wooden boats via working together with traditionally-minded clubs and associations. Are you a Waitemata Woody? The Waitemata Woodies blog provides a virtual meeting point for lovers of classic and traditional wooden boats.
 If you are interested in our interests and activities become a follower to this blog. The Vessels Featured The boats on display here (yes there are some yachts included, some are just to drop dead stunning to over look) require patrons, people devoted to their care and up keep, financially and emotionally . The owners of these boats understand the importance of owning, restoring and keeping a part of the golden age of Kiwi boating alive. The boats are true Kiwi treasure to be preserved and appreciated.

Zephyr

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ZEPHYR
Last month I was contacted by Rowan Lane who had seen the painting of the launch Zephyr I posted on WW, refer photo below. 
Rowan is a blue blooded woody eg his surname – Lane, links him to the clan whose craft frequently appear on WW
pages. I have posted the note Rowan sent me below
“The June posting of the painting of “Zephyr” on the Whangaroa Harbour
prompted a rummage through the family albums. My father Major Lane (family
name not title) rescued Zephyr from the foreshore of the Whangaroa Harbour.
Dad was nephew to Richard Ernest (Ernie) Lane who had relocated from
Whangaroa to Picton.
Zephyr was in a sorry state inviting each incoming tide inside for a chat through its cracks and opened seams. My father set about repairing the hull re-ribbed and re fastened throughout and installed a Gray Marine petrol engine. This was in the 1930’s. 
Zephyr was seconded to the NZ Army during the war years and was used to deliver supplies to the Army post at what is now Kingfish Lodge at the entrance to the Whangaroa Harbour.
In the top photo above we see Zephyr moored at Kingfish Point. Zephyr’s dodger was modified after the war when Zephyr became a commercial fishing vessel RL 36.
My father sold Zephyr around 1950 to Joe Mueller who had emigrated to NZ from South Africa. Joe used the ‘anglicised’ spelling Millar I believe to ally any fears that he may have been of German descent. Joe continued commercial fishing for a while before changing Zephyr to a game fish charter launch.”

 

Zephyr

Stella Rose

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STELLA ROSE

The 33’ clinker built Stella Rose was built by R E Swanson in Queen Charlotte  Sound, Marlborough, South Island and launched in 1967.
The forward motion is via a Lees Ford 70hp diesel engine that gets her along at 8 knots. She sips 4L an hour and given her 2 x 200L fuel tanks – you could lap NZ on one fill 🙂
From her tme listing (thanks Ian McDonald) Stella Rose appears to be a very well appointed woody and good value for the asking price.
Home is the Havelock Marina in the upper South Island.
A Wee Trip To Thames and Coromandel
Woody boat wise, didn’t see anything that hasn’t already appeared on WW but did visit one of my fav spots – Shortland Wharf in Thames, home of the brilliant fish mart that also cooks for you and delivers to the Wharf Cafe & Bar alongside. After a crap day on Wednesday that saw me caught in a hail down pour – today was a stunner, with a sun set to match. The F&C’s were accompanied by my World Famous in Devonport tomato sauce, sneaked it in 🙂 (and to the dietitians out there – the meal was for 2 people)
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Ruamano RIP

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RUAMANO RIP

In the bundle of prints I received from Bryce Strong were the above photos of the 1925 Collings & Bell built launch – Ruamano. Sadly she was abandoned in 2000 off the West Coast of the North Island. I have not come across many colour photos of her, so published these to showcase what a fine ship she was.
Reading reports of the incident she might have been saved, it would appear that her crew were a little too hasty in climbing off her. You can read more about the incident in the first WW story link below.
Given the passage of time, maybe someone would like to tell us more about how she came to be abandoned.

Waikere

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WAIKERE

Today’s woody comes to us from Bryce Strong’s photo collection – another CV-19 clean out bonus.
Above we have the launch Waikere, an unknown to me, so keen to uncover her past and whether she is still around today.
The top photo is dated Easter 1988. The bottom photo lists the location as Ponui Island, and is dated March 1989.  This photo comes with an added bonus – the woodys in the photo are (L>R) Lady Margaret (1940 Dick Lang), Altair and Waikere – the bonus is that I have never seen a colour photo of Altair with varnished coamings and pre the ‘block of flats’ she now carries (current photo below).
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Input from Jeff Norris – Waikere belonged to my brother Dave Norris back then he used to keep it up the Clevedon river on a private marina along side Altair and a another boat called Apacha. He told me she was 32’ and built by Shipbuilders with a carvel hull and powered by a 100hp Ford

Lake Manapouri – Manurere

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LAKE MANAPOURI  – MANURERE

Today’s woody is seen in the Western Arm of Safe Cove, Lake Manapouri, Southland. Photos ex Lew Redwood fb (Hocken).
On fb Daniel Hickes commented that the vessel maybe the Govt. steamer – Manurere., powered by a 1901 quadruple expansion steam engine, built by Simpson Strickland and Co. of Dartmouth, England.
Rather a smart clinker alongside 😉
Harold Kidd Input – MANURERE was only 40ft long. Built by Bailey & Lowe in Auckland in 1905, shipped to Bluff, railed to Mossburn and taken over to Manapouri by wagon drawn by a steam traction engine. She had a Thornycroft high-pressure boiler and Simpson Strickland “patent quadruple engines”. She was in service by February 1906. A neat little steamer.
Some Trivia
Ever wondered where the term ‘hang-over’ came from.
Seems its origin is related to woody boating – back in Victorian England, the cheapest (lowest) form of accommodation was access to bend over a rope for the night at the price of a penny. Usually used by drunken sailors who had spent all their money drinking.
I have always wondered how all the crew on the CYA’s A-Class gaffers managed to sleep 🙂
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Marne (Marie)

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MARNE (Marie)
Today’s woody popped up on Lew Redwood’s fb, the photo is tagged Waitangi River, Bay of Islands and dated 07-01-1924. Those with 20/20 vision will note her bow displays the name Marie, but Harold Kidd has advised that when launched by Collings & Bell in 1919 she was named Marne.
She made a brief appearance on WW back in August 2013. Link below
Do we know any more about her?
Harold Kidd Input – She was built by Collings &Bell in 1919 as MARNE (although God knows why anyone who had been there would name a boat after that French battleground) for J Goodwill. No details of first engine but probably a Doman. That was replaced with a 4 cylinder (Doman?) when J Parker bought her in 1921. In Parker’s ownership she became MARIE and was fitted with a 40hp Fay & Bowen in 1923. The name MARNE stuck however through later owners. She was pretty well set-up and was valued at 675 pounds, a colossal amount at the time.
Alex Stewart bought her in the 1930s and called her MARGARET S.
see

1985 Chas Bailey Gaffer – Ida – Invitation To View

Our greatest champion of classic wooden boating – John Street, has asked that I pass on an open invitation to all woody lovers to attend the official ‘christening’ of Ida, the 1895 Chas Bailey designed gaffer. The occasion will held at the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron on Sunday 19th July between 4 and 6pm.
The location provides a perfect platform to get up close to Ida and view the outstanding restoration by Wayne Olsen and the team at Horizon Yachts.
Ida is the latest addition to the majestic fleet of classic wooden craft under the guardianship of The Classic Yacht Charitable Trust.
Ida Invite
Woody Classics Weekend Clevedon #2 copy
RSVP waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Woody Lake Taupo Boat Tour + Woody Event Details

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WOODY LAKE TAUPO BOAT TOUR + WOODY EVENT DETAILS
One of WW’s most local supporters is Bay of Islands woody, Dean Wright – today Dean takes us on a recent mooch around Lake Taupo’s shoreline, click photos to enlarge –  Enjoy 🙂
WAIROA RIVER – WOODY OVERNIGHT CRUISE
Back in November 2019 we had an amazing woody weekend at the Clevedon Cruising Club. At the time everyone expressed a desire to repeat the trip up the Wairoa River asap, then CV-19 popped up, so we pulled the hand-brake.
Well folks the cruise is back on and for now there are two things to do:
1. Circle August 8-9 in the diary
The CCC is a brilliant venue, with dock-side berthing, undercover BBQ / dining facilities and a great group of members that make the trip so special.
And its dog friendly ! – so fido gets to come along.
Woody Classics Weekend Clevedon #2 copy

Foam

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FOAM
As a result of a wee mishap at the Greymouth wharf, the kauri clinker, double ender ex work boat Foam is offered for sale.
Her tme listing states that she is over 100 years old and its thought she may have been built at Bruce Bay, South Westland on the South Island west coat..
Used as a flax tug towing logs out to ships. She is a tad over 27’ in length and has been submerged.
The listing says the 37hp 3 cyl. Perkins will go again and she needs a few new planks, but what a honey. Track down a small Gardner, redo the cabin and you would have a great woody.
Sadly being currently on the hard in Greymouth, will be a hinderance to her survival.
Foam made a brief appearance on WW back in 2017 – link below

Mistletoe

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MISTLETOE
The photos above of Mistletoe were taken by Dean Wright back in 2007 at the Whangaroa Game Fishing Club competition. She certainly is a salty old girl.
Anyone able to tell us more about her and where she is today?
We also see Little Hinemoa and the yacht Puff.
Garcon – Cute Work Boat
The photo below, ex WoodenBoat fb, is proof that with a good eye and a little love even a 2020 built 21’ work boat can be pleasing to the eye. Built by Doug Cooper at Eldred Cooper Boats in Falmouth, Massachusetts, she is strip-planked cedar on oak – very smart 🙂
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Pirate (Karo)

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PIRATE (Karo)
 

The owner of Pirate, Bryce Armstrong, sent in the above photo of the 32’  Bob Swanson built launch. She was launched in 1977 and was the last launch Swanson built. The original owner in Picton finished the topsides

When launched she was named Karo and her hull is 1” kauri.
That woodys is all Bryce knows about the launch and he would love to find out more. 
Any Southern woodys able to help out?

Lady Jane

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LADY JANE
The 32’10” Lady Jane was built in 1930, her builder is unknown, a previous owner believed it was built by Lidgards at Kawau Island but others have suggested Sam Ford. The black and white photo above is dated 1948.
Engine is a Ford 80hp diesel and LJ over the last 9 years has undergone a ‘rolling-restoration’ to see her in the condition she is presented in, on her tme listing.
I’m not sure which of the cabin window configuration I prefer – the x3 TV monitors eg  or the x3 ‘eyebrow’ version on the b/w photo.
FYI – there have several Lady Jane launches on WW, seems she was a popular lady 🙂
Would be nice if we could confirm the design / builder?
Harold Kidd Input – The LADY JANE in the black & white photo is clearly a built-up flush-decker of the period 1910-15. The arch-topped side windows are a dead giveaway. Sam Ford was at school at the time.

Llandallah

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LLANDALLAH

The above photo popped up yesterday on Lew Redwood’s fb and its just such a great photo it shot to the front of the ‘upcoming WW stories’ list.
The photo is ‘credited to a Deb Green and is captioned ‘ 1948 Whangarei Harbour’.
Harold Kidd has commented that he believes she is now based on the Kaipara Harbour, and had a name change c.1948, and wonders, as we do, what she was built as?
A google search comes up with a launch named Llandallah owned by a Ivan Laurence Covacich, a press clipping is titled ‘Another Launch For Whangarei Fishing’ – so this may support Harold Kidd’s reference to the launch and another boat named Sceptre in a Boating NZ Nov 2019 article on the Swales family.
I couldn’t read the Covacich related article (added below – ex HDK) as it was on Ancestory.com and signing into that is like giving the CIA full access to your digital footprint 🙂 Maybe an existing member can view it and advise if there is any further reference that might help ID the boat/s.
So woodys – any input as to her provenance ?
Harold Kidd Input – I had quite forgotten my own Boating NZ articles on the Swales family when I postulated that LLANDALLAH was SCEPTRE. “I Covacich” owned SCEPTRE at Whangarei in 1949 according to the APYMBA records. So it’s more than probable that LLANDALLAH was SCEPTRE, renamed by Ivan Covacich when he bought her from the Bay of Islands in 1948. If that’s what happened, then,
1. SCEPTRE/LLANDALLAH was built by the Swales brothers in 1913 (possibly at David Gouk’s yard in Freeman’s Bay) not by Dick Lang although she is of the wholesome type that Dick built.
2. The Swales sold her to the Mason brothers in Whangarei in 1924. They probably re-engined her in the 30s with the St. Lawrence (VALERIE had one from new)
3. Ivan Covacich bought her from the Bay in 1948 and renamed her. But why did a man of proud Croatian ancestry give her such a name which is not even Welsh???
4. One problem with all this is that the 1948 Northern Advocate piece says LLANDALLAH is 32ft when SCEPTRE was 38ft. Journalistic slip?
Input from Lew Redwood – press clipping below from the 26 October 1949 edition of the Northern Advocate.
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Input from Chris McMullen 

Chris’s eye eye has reminded me of a ‘Mystery Launch’ photo we had once on WW, it showed a launch with a Lug sail (see below). At the time Chris printed it off at as he thought of fitting a Lug sail to Wirihana.  Reading the newspaper story on Llandallah Chris picked up on the large lug sail, he thought that was unusual for a launch and went back through his files. After reviewing the older WW photo Chris believes this is the same launch prior to having the raised cabin added. Lugsail drawing nicely. The portholes and sheer line the same. 
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More Input from Lew Redwood
The article below ex the Northern Advocate 9th November 1949 – again listed Liandallah as being 32’ and the 2nd article that shows Sceptre (licensed to carry 40 passengers) in Whangarei 31 Dec 1949. This all backs up Harolds view (below) that they are two different vessels 🙂 
 
01-07-2020 Harold KiddInput Just to take the cat away from the pigeons, I’ve satisfied myself that LLANDALLAH is NOT SCEPTRE. Not only is she too small (32ft v 40ft) but also SCEPTRE was still operating as a commercial vessel in Whangarei in December 1949, weeks after LLANDALLAH had been trucked to Dargaville.
Watch this space…..or maybe not?

Classic Wooden Boat Riverhead Cruise

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Classic Wooden Boat Riverhead Cruise

Yesterday’s creek (river) cruise to the Riverhead Tavern was another successful gig on the Woodys Classics Weekend calendar. 14 boats made the trip up the creek and with no ferries working, we had the wharf to ourselves. Always nice to be greeted at the wharf by the publican and woody boater – Stephen Pepperell. We enjoyed brilliant support and service from the rest of the team at the tavern insured the day went like clockwork and 85+people enjoyed a great catch up, chat and lunch. The sun shone at the right times (most of the day) so a good times was had by all. Wonderful to see the support from the people that made the trip by car.
Details on the next event soon 🙂
MORE PHOTO’S @ link below
My crew for the day Chris Miller has posted some great photos on his weblog, I was concentrating on helming the ship and given CM is a pro photographer I left the camera work to Chris. Enjoy 🙂

Matatua & Floss – Sailing Sunday

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MATATUA

Picton boat builder Mike Coutts is doing a shout out to see if anyone would be interested in getting involved in the restoration of the 1938, Jim Lidgard built, 32’9″ yacht Matatua that he has taken over. Any help, advice or information would be welcome. I’ll let Mike tell the story.
Anyone able to help out – contact Mike via email at kootamac@gmail.com
 
“I have been given Matatua to restore , i can do anything given the time and money but both are in short supply here at present ! she has a lot of history in Wellington with Port Nick and has sailed to all corners of the Pacific several times that i know of. I served my time with John Lidgard and i have asked him and he said she was one of Jim Lidgard’s designs and built at Kauwau Island but he cant recall much more . Some one bolted a steel rudder and skeg , mounted a Coventry engine on steel engine beds, put an alloy mast on a steel mast step and extended the hull by about a meter . As you can imagine the dilignafication in some of these areas is quite severe, I told 2 previous owners that they had to get the steel out of her to no avail 25 years ago ! i have her on the hard at $150 a week and have got the steel rudder skeg off and working on the engine beds, mast out next and remove the steel mast step, chainplates etc . I would like to restore her but at this stage just trying to preserve whats left , which is surprisingly good, another testiment to Kiwi boat building and heart kauri” 
02-07-2020 Input from Robin Elliott and Harold Kidd

Harold and I have finally sorted the mystery of Matatua (well it was only a mystery to us, the rest of the world couldn’t care less 🙂 ).

Matatua was built as a 33-foot ketch by Roy Lidgard in 1938 at their yard in Freemans Bay Auckland for C.T. Jonas who originally named her Landfall.
NZ Herald 13/8/1938 has a photo of her on page 12 being built ‘for C.T. Jonas’.
Landfall was launched 19/11/1938 and described as an ‘auxilliary ketch’ 33ft overall, 26ft on the waterline with 9ft 6in beam. She carried 600 sq ft of sail and it was reported that her owner intended making a cruise to the islands at the end of the 1938-39 season.

From then on, no more mention of Landfall and it appears that C.T. Jonas and his co-owner Harry Gillard, renamed her Matatua quite soon after launching.

The ketch Matatua first appears in print in February 1939 racing with other boats in the Lidgard employees picnic from the Freemans Bay slipway to Motuihe. She raced regularly with RNZYS and RAYC for the rest of the season. Her registration number was B-9.

The ketch rig clearly wasn’t a success because in September 1939 the NZH 26/9/39 reports ‘aux yacht Landfall owned by C.T. Jonas which made an appearance last year under ketch rig has been converted into a cutter’. This reference to Landfall is odd because she had been named Matatua since at least the beginning of 1939, but maybe they were just making the connection back their earlier articles.

In the winter of 1940, yet more improvements.
NZH 2/7/40: B-class yacht Matatua owned by C. Jonas has had 2ft 6in added to her counter by Lidgard Bros. OA length now 35ft 6in and will enable carrying a permanent backstay,
NZH 9/12/40: Photo of Matatua with her new cutter rig, B-9 on the sail.

The war intervenes and Matatua ceases racing.

During this time the Auckland yacht registration records, probably having been moved about or in storage during the war, had fallen into disarray. By the time a new list is published in July 1946, Matatua has been registered twice, first by Harry Gillard, who retained B-9, and again by C.T. Jonas who got a new number B-24. The error was picked up and B-24 lapsed but it remained in the official lists for a couple of seasons until another purge of obsolete registrations in 1948.

Clarrie Irvine raced Matatua, as B-9, for the next couple of seasons and sold her in 1949 to R. Campbell of Wellington. The trip to Wellington under delivery skipper Terry Hammond was hard and they were missing for several days after hitting a nor’westerly gale just off Cape Palliser that blew them as far south as Kaikoura. After getting back to almost the same spot, they ran into a westerly gale that blew them back out to sea. Eventually Matatua got to Wellington, her crew had been battered for 84 hours.

Matatua remained in Wellington (registered as Wellington A-10) for the next 12 years or so. She was purchased by K. Stutter in 1957, and in 1962 was sold to D. Fletcher of Epsom who brought her back to Auckland where she picked up her old number of B-9. Fletcher didn’t appear to do any racing but in 1968 he sold her to George Retter of the Richmond Yacht Club who owned and raced her until 1981.

Matatua has had no registered owners since then. Her NZYF number is 109

One major confusion with Matatua has been the Bob Stewart design Mata-a-tua built for George Gresham of Tauranga in 1947. When Matatua was sold to Wellington, her B-9 registration became vacant and was issued to Gresham’s Mata-a-tua thus beginning a series of tortured confusions in boating magazines and newspapers between the two boats.

This was continued when Mata-a-tua was also sold to Wellington in 1958 where she became Wellington A-9. Her owner Brian Millar brought her to Auckland in 1964 and she entered the 1965 Anniversary Regatta under her Wellington number A-9. (A-9?.. A-9??.. That’s Moana and We can’t have that!!) In February she was re-registered as B-47.

Another tedious ‘golly gee’ point. Both Clarrie Irvine and George Retter owned the Bailey built C-class Matua C-54. Both of them sold Matua to buy Matatua

I have been told to ‘get a life’ by many people.

 

FLOSS – 4sale
Recently Baden Pascoe sent me details on Floss – the sailing dinghy below. Baden’s father Howard, built the glued ply dinghy which is now for sale. Owner Jock Speedy is only the second owner. I understand Jock is open to reasonable offers. Contact via email at jmspeedy55@gmail.com
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Jean Marie + Build A 1/2 Model Boat

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JEAN MARIE

Today’s woody popped up on Mitchell Hutchings’s fb, the photo was taken some years ago and Mitchell was unaware of the woodys name. The photo came from the Williamson Family collection.
Avon Cruel has commented that she appears to be Jean Marie and was owned by George Irvine during the 1980’s, on the Kaipara Harbour (West Coast of NZ)
Can any woodys confirm, enlighten us on the vessel?
Looking For Something Really Cool To Do – Build a 1/2 Model
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Master craftsman Allan Hooper is running another of his weekend (2 day) courses at the NZ Traditional Boat Building School in Auckland – next weekend (July 4/5th).
You will learn the basics of lofting and develop a great understanding of how lines are used to design a boat hull. At the end of the 2 days you will walk away with your own half model.
Course bookings at the link below
Check out the last workshop review below ex attendee Christine Beech.
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Classic Wooden Boat Dockside Tour

CLASSIC WOODEN BOAT DOCKSIDE TOUR
Today’s woody story takes us on a woody tour of the Cowichan Bay Maritime Centre, in Southern Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Our host is Mike O’Brian, a few years ago I entertained Mike and wife Peggy in Auckland, they were on a cruise liner and just in port for the day. I picked them up and took them on a dock tour of a selection of our finest wooden classics, made even better by each skipper turning up and opening their boats up.
NEW WOODY OWNERS
Pleased to be able to report that the classic wooden launches Centaurus, Mahanui, Kailua and Haunui have all recently changed hands. All will remain in Auckland 🙂 and are in the care of passionate wooden boat enthusiasts.
SUNDAYS WOODY CLASSICS RIVERHEAD CRUISE – IMPORTANT DETAILS
(If you RSVP’ed I have sent you further details via email)
WCW Riverhead June2020

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CAROUSEL

Today’s woody is another photo from Bryce Strong’s collection – the launch is named Carousel and is a mystery to the WW data-base.
Can anyone help us uncover her provenance?
REMEMBER WOODYS – ONLY 3 DAYS TILL THE LUNCH CRUISE TO THE RIVERHEAD TAVERN
 I’ll be emailing out meeting times etc today to attending boats and those attending by car 🙂
WCW Riverhead June2020

Antares

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ANTARES
Recently I received from Bryce Strong an envelope of ‘old’ boating photos – the result of a CV-19 lock-down cull of the family photo collection. Its a flash back of woody boating on and around the Waitemata.
The above photos show the 34’ Antares, built in the 1950’s by Supreme Craft in Auckland. I suspect that at the time, Antares was owned by Bryce’s brother-in-law, Ron Philips.
Antares has appeared on WW several times  and you can see / read more of her past at the link below, be sure to check out the additional links in the story to experience more.

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/09/25/antares-2/

Who Can Help ID This Yacht
The vessel below was snapped by Cameron Pollard at the entrance to the Tamaki River – Cameron estimate her length around 55′.
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Input & photo below from John Mellars – owner built, spotted Whangaparapara 15 March 2019.
Not very woody though.
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WCW Riverhead June2020
RSVP waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Mystery Launches – Mansion House Bay

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Mystery Launches – Mansion House Bay

Today’s photo of Mansion House Bay, Kawau Island comes to us via Lew Redwood’s fb and is tagged 1920 – 1939 so that date spread isn’t much use to us.
An unusual photo given that no yachts are seen.
Any eagle eyed woodys able or brave enough to ID any of the boats?
Ken Ricketts was probably there (in nappies) and will remember the sound of each boats engine 🙂
WCW Riverhead June2020
RSVP  waitematawoodys@gmail.com

An Epic Tale of Whalers, Fishermen,  Farmers & Commercial Launch Masters

Prima Donna built by Lanes 1911 for Herman & Darcey Baldick 001

Primadonna built by Lanes for Ernie & Darcey Baldick 001

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An Epic Tale of Whalers, Fishermen,  Farmers & Commercial Launch Masters
 

The story below without doubt is the best to appear on WW, author Pete Beech talks at one stage about writing a book – he needs to. Surely there is a funding channel available – what’s the literary equivalent of ‘NZ On Air’?

The story came about via the recent WW story on the ex whaler chaser – Primmadona and her relocation from the South to Aucklands Waitemata waters. I will let Pete tell you his story, as he told me – its a cracker – enjoy
 
As an aside I spotted Pete’s ‘work’ boat – Tutanekai, mentioned in the story in Queen Charlotte Sound two years ago, I admired her then, sadly I was too busy pushing bacon and eggs down the gullet at the rather swanky, Bay of Many Coves resort, to say hi – my loss, but I’ll be back. Photos of her at the WW link below:
 
Previous WW Primadonna stories:
PART ONE
Kia Ora Alan,
Thanks for making contact, I was sent a link to your site by my sister who lives on her yacht in an Auckland marina. She thought I’d be interested in your story on our old waka, Primadonna.
You and I obviously have a lot in common, 40 yrs ago there were a lot of old Sounds launches coming to the end of their days, my old dad worked for Ernie Lane as a young man then for Jack Morgan and Rodger Carey.
He and his old mates had been Sounds farmers, whalers , fishermen and commercial launch masters, when ever they got together conversation would always revert to “Boats ! “
We lived in a bay down the Sounds, old pa could identify the older boats by the sound of their exhausts, before they rounded the points and came into view. The old guys would tell you who built them, what year, how much they cost, what they were planked out of, some were sister ships (2 keels cut out of the same log) where the logs were sourced from for the planking, what timber they used for the ribs, what make of engine they used, how much it cost, what horse power they developed and how many GPH they burnt and  what revs  they run at.
They took pride in knowing the whole whakapapa of all the old waka, how many hours the engines did until they were worn out and rebuilt or replaced, in those days after 5/ 10 yrs they would replace with bigger more powerful engines, they would also tell you how the engine was taken out of one boat and put into another and so on.
I grew up hearing all these oral histories and like a couple of your writers mentioned the accuracy of some of these stories was lost in the telling, then my old dad passed on and I got to thinking that if someone doesn’t write down these oral histories within 50 years, they will pass from living memory and be lost to time.
So I went around and interviewed a number of the old timers and collected all the photos I could, so pleased I did because those old boys are all gone now and their kids tossed out their photos.
It was funny, they just loved to talk about their boats, often their wives used to ring me up and say “could you come back and talk to dad again, hes driving me mad ! “
For years I have fostered an ambition to compile a book using this material and feel a bit precious about it, however no one has a monopoly over history and it should be shared, who knows the millennials may have no interested in our nautical treasures .
I have been a mechanic, a marine engineer, a fisherman, a commercial launchmaster a boat builder and for the last 30 years have run an eco tour with our old waka the near 90 yr old Tutanekai. I used to think that the day would come when people would regard the old classics like they do vintage cars and would restore them.
However it hasn’t really happened here and sadly many of our old classics have  been sold out of the area many finding their way to Auckland, I will miss seeing the beautiful counter stern of the old Primmadonna on the Sound, she is so much part of our local history.
I’m so pleased to see the resurgence of traditional boats in Auckland and sure a lot of credit should go to you for the sparking peoples interest in the classic wooden boats.
I remember when she was sold to a feller up on the Foxton River, he eventually put her up for sale but no one wanted her, so he rang me up and said “I’ll sell it to you for bugger all, if you don’t I’m going to cut the side out of her with a chainsaw and turn it into a road side stall. 
I contacted Ian Baldick, nephew of the original owner and said that old girl is your family heritage, you should buy her back, he said OK boy , you’re right, I’ll do it on one condition, that you come with me to bring her back home.
So away we went, made the deal, checked out the old Lister, changed the oil and fuel filters and set off for home, when we got down close to the bar there was a big swell and old Ian said theres something wrong, she’s not lifting to the swell, he said pull her up, he went down into the front cabin, lifted up the bunk swabs and found that the whole forward section was full of river boulders, (this had been done because when you run the old lady on full throttle the stern would suck right down until the water was level with the deck and if you were steering from inside the cabin you couldn’t see over the bow).
We tossed all the boulders overboard and charged out over the bar, there were 3 very big waves, she rode up over the first then put her head down and dove under the second and in what seemed like an eternity finally lifted, rose over the third and burst out into the open sea, old Baldy said if we hadn’t thrown those boulders out she would of gone straight to the bottom !!!
He told me that she had been build too fine with not enough buoyancy in the bow, straight stemmed with no flare, he said that one time they we steaming out around Cape Jackson when they went thru the big rip where the Pacific and the Tasman seas meet there are often half a dozen big waves, he said that she responded the same way a stick does when you throw it into the water. He said you had to shut the throttle off and pull her out of gear,   she went down by the head and kept going down until her buoyancy finally made her shoot back out back wards just like a stick !  He said that on this occasion one of their mates was standing on the foredeck, he said that when this occurred he wrapped himself around the mast and held on for grim death, he said that when she popped out they went forward and couldn’t get their mate to let go of the mast, he said he had squeezed it that hard he ‘d squeezed all the sap out of it and they needed a screw driver to prize his finger nails out of the mast !
I also owned the old Fleetwing at one time, but that’s another story.
The old waka in my shed is a true classic launch, is just the bare hull and is in beautiful condition for its age, has been in my shed for 30 years waiting for attention, I’ll never get around to it , I only rescued it because I knew her history and wanted to see her preserved, she had a 5 HP Frisco Standard in her for years, shes only 6 ft beam, they didn’t start building them with 8ft beam until the twin cyl 8 hp Friscos came out in the 1920’s.
The Baldicks said that they flush decked her for gropher fishing and that when they were steaming around Dieffenbach Point in a strong southerly she would roll over that far that your shoulders would be in the water.!
What I could do is send you the story of her builder Ernest Berg who  was a real character, was bankrupted 3 times but kept reinventing himself, a real conman but he built beautiful boats, back at the turn of the century, 3 of them left that I know of.
That’s enough for now, Keep up your good work mate.
PART TWO
Kia Ora Alan,
My pleasure, always interesting to look at a series of photos taken of a wooden boat that shows how their superstructures  were changed to suit their roles and how their engines got bigger and bigger with advances in technology.
My old waka “Tutanekai originally had an 18 hp twin cyl Regal, that was replaced by a 40 hp 4 cyl sterling, then a 60hp, 6 cyl Hercules, a 110 hp  471 GM during the war, currently has a 120 hp GM and have a 6 cyl 340 hp Yanma  in the shed to replace the GM, ( but it refuses to die.)
My apologies, but I don’t know (or don’t remember )  what the original engines were in the Primadonna,  most of the early launches back in the 1920’s had 5 hp single cylinder Frisco standards when they wore out were replaced by 2 cylinder 8 hp Friscos, they were replaced in the 1940’s with car engines then in the 1950s with truck or tractor diesel engines like 4 cyl Fords or GM’s , (lucky ones had Gardners ! )
When Alf Baldick finished whaling he used the Primmadonna as a farm boat and for transport to and from town, there were no roads in the Sounds.
He sold to a guy McManaway who was a gropher fisherman, he did away with the rear wheel house to give him more deck space and fish hold, he built a pilot house over rear of front cabin. He sold to Rex Baldick, Alfs nephew, he was farming in East Bay and spent a lot of time hunting, you would often see her at the Picton wharf with stern deck covered with carcasses of pigs and deer.
Rex sold to Ken MacArther who fished her out of the Wairau Bar, she caught fire on him, he took the 4 cyl Ford out that Rex had put in and replaced with a three cylinder Lister.
That was the end of her commercial fishing era, she had several owners and more changes to her superstructure, they replaced the rear wheelhouse, when I had it she had a coal scuttle that stuck up above the cabin top so you didn’t have to duck , getting in and out of the cabin. Before Ian Baldick bought her back into family ownership he threw the Lister out and put a reconditioned 4 cly Ford back in her, cut the coal scuttle off and replaced with a sliding hatch, put a new S/S shaft in her and did a great job of tidying her up. When he retired he put a line hauler on her for gropher fishing and spent a lot of time out fishing and deer shooting, when he past on she was sold but a couple of owners latter his son in law bought her back again for running the whanau to and fro to their bach.
Sad that she has been sold out of the Sounds, but who knows some day she may find her way home, it has happened before !
Nga Mihi,
Pete.
Woody Classics Weekend #5 Riverhead
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Mana

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MANA

Back in late February, David Cooke sent me the above photos which were sent to him by Ken McGill.
I’m not sure of the location, possibly Mana ?
Can anyone ID the yacht?
Input from Jason Prew – It’s the Col Wild built and designed Mana with the (in)famous Sam McGill looking after this haul out.
And at the other end of the scale – some eye candy below – the 1934, 30-Square Metre, 43’ yacht – Tre Sang, seen here leaving the Robbe & Berking, Flensburg Germany, shipyard.
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Diana S (Oke Bay)

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DIANA S

Today’s woody story is in response to an email I received from Diana Dummett in Australia, Diana’s Auckland sister was mooching around the web and came across the WW site, a quick search for the families old launch and jackpot up came the June 2017 story on the launch Oke Bay (formally named Diana S)
So – some background – Diana is Diana S, her father was Henry Durban Slyfield. Diana commented that the family spent many summer holidays cruising around the Bay of Islands. At the time Diana was 6>7 years old and that is her in the photo below sitting on the bow of Dianna S 🙂
Its great to see this photo of Diana S and to see that she has retained her look over all these years – photos and more detail at the WW link below. Lots of chat in the comments section 😉
Diana
WCW Riverhead June2020
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Pal O Mine

Pal O Mine

PAL O MINE
 
One of WW’s more loyal followers is Barrie Abel, owner of the c.1912 classic woody – Matira. Barrie lives in Kawakawa Bay and approx. 7 years ago on a visit to his neighbours property he spotted a cool photo of a wooden boat on the neighbours wall. Barrie recalled launch was named Pal O Mine. Being a shy, reserved type (yeah right) Barrie didn’t ask more about the boat. Fast forward 7 years and Barrie recalled the photo and asked his neighbour, Tosy Joyce  about it. Turns out that Pal O Mine was owned by Tosy’s fathers.
Barrie learned that Pal O Mine had spent some time down in Kawakawa Bay,  but Tosy’s not sure when. He is confident that in the photo above its the father at the helm.
 
Pal O Mine has appeared on WW before, primarily for two reasons
1. She was* a looker
2. In her day she was a seriously quick boat – you just have to look at the above photo is see that
 
* in point (1) above I say ‘was’, this is because sadly Pal O Mine was washed a shore in a storm and wrecked on the rocks near OBC, Tamaki Drive, Auckland.
Built in 1924 by the Tercel brother, famous for the builders of the stunningly fast yacht – Ranger. Pal O Mine has a 125hp engine – rather large for those days – thence the zoom zoom.
Link below to view more photo 
 
 
 
GREAT RESPONSE TO THE UPCOMING RIVERHEAD LAUNCH CRUISE – FLYER BELOW. Could I ask if you haven’t RSVP’ed that you do, makes planning re anchoring and catering easier 😉 FYI – this isn’t  CYA organised gig so any woody owner / lover is welcome to come along. Its always a great day and lots of catching up / chat.
RSVP (boat name and approx. numbers)      waitematawoodys@gmail.com
 
Woody Classics Weekend #5 Riverhead

Zephyr

Zephyr

ZEPHYR
 
The rather good painting above of Zephyr comes to us via Wally Herbert’s fb, and Wally commented that it showed his father Albert and Joe Miller on Zephyr at the Whangaroa Harbor entrance.
There has been a lot of previous chat on WW regarding another launch named Zephyr (link below) , keen to ID this one and learn her provenance.
On the fb post a Peter Rooke commented that helots saw her in Tauranga.
 

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/03/20/could-this-be-zephyr/

A Floating Block of Flats
WW readers will know that I occasionally poke fun at boats that have been ‘altered’ or had cabin additions and end up resembling a block of flats. Well today woodys we see the reverse – a block of flats that float.
The below appeared at Bayswater marina last year and is someones home, each to their own but if I owned a marina alongside it, I wouldn’t be impressed………
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WCW Riverhead June2020
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Westland

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WESTLAND

For a 1971 build, the 33’6” – Westland has a nice classic look to her.
Power is via a Ford 180hp turbo diesel that has her cruising at 9>12 knots.
Built with twin skin timber and glassed over (….. it is 1971).
From her tme listing (thanks Ian McDonald) she appears to be very well fitted out.
Home port is the Marlborough Sounds.
Anyone able to tell us the design / builder?
WCW Riverhead June2020

Mystery Taupo Launch + Woody Eye Candy

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MYSTERY LAKE TAUPO LAUNCH + WOODY EYE-CANDY
The above b/w photo comes to us from Lew Redwood’s fb.Details on the launch are un-know, can anyone help ID the boat.
Paul Drake Input – Probably RHODESIA. Photo shows her at Waihora Bay. The post sticking out of the water would be from the jetty which used to be there a long time ago. There are eight short stumps there to this day. Little is known of RHODESIA, but patrons of Domino’s pizza joint on the Lake Front in Taupo can study her, as they wait for their order, in the large format photo which is part of that establishment’s decor.

Harold Kidd Input – RHODESIA was built in Auckland in September 1912 and railed down to Rotorua. She was 30ft loa 8fft beam 2ft 9in draught. Her first owner was Marshall Ryan Shipping Co who used Bailey & Lowe for their new builds so it’s a fair bet they built her too. Roy Forrester of Helensville ran her for the company in the years immediately after WW1. When Taupo Shipping Co was liquidated and its assets sold off in August 1925 she was sold off. I am not sure she was then renamed TUWHARETOA because Sam Crowther was running a TUWHARETOA for hire in 1923.

There’ll be an answer which I suspect Paul Drake will ferret out.
Paul Drake Input / Reply to HDK – The idea that RHODESIA became TUWHARETOA is very interesting and quite possible. I remember her in the 1950’s. She had a raised cabin, to the full width of the original cabin, which was very well done. To my eye, she was a looker.
Continuing on with the Taupo thread, over the weekend Dean Wright sent in a gallery of photos from the marina at Lake Taupo, included was the stunner below of the Drake Brothers (Michael / Paul / Nigel / Roger) launch East Wind. When I shared the photo with Paul Drake he advised that it was him in the cockpit homeward bound from one of his recent weekly fishing expeditions.
In the photo Paul is seen taking soundings with the boathook. The lake is quite low and that day the bottom looked very close in that part of the channel. You can see that he has the boat hook at the ready, the minimum sounding was about four feet.
He also commented that the fishing since the lifting of lock-down seems to be rather good.
The Drake family have owned East Wind for approx. 50 years, but know little of her early provenance (<1920). She was clearly built as an open boat with motor. She still has the original foredeck and coaming under the newer raised deck. See 1932 photo below – East Wind, centre with another of the Drake boats Romance directly astern. 
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WCW Riverhead June2020

Lolita II – SOS

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LOLITA II (Wondabyne)
 
This fine old girl with a great provenance has put her hand up for help. 
The story goes like this – woody Keith Brady was visiting the Bay of Islands at the end of May and called in to see the owner of Lolita II, Peter Deeming as part of his research into boat builder Dick Lang and his boats.
You will have observed from the above photos that Lolita II is in a poor state, but in Keith’s opinion is in a condition that is able to be restored by an enthusiastic person/s with the skills and vision of restoring an old classic. There is a significant amount of work involved, but with time and funding the boat is able to be restored to its former days.
Keith commented that after talking to Peter Deeming he found him approachable and interested in the boat going to someone who will restore it.  
B/W photos ex Andy Donovan collection.
 
She made an appearance on WW last year, where we uncovered some of her past – WW link below.
 
Boat S/S Water Tank Advice

Asking for a friend (yeah right)……  are there any solutions to repairing small leak (seam) to a boats water tank without removing the tank?
There was talk of a bladder system / product that can be inserted into the existing tank – anyone come across it?
Feedback / suggestions to waitematawoodys@gmail.com.
Woody Classics Weekend #5 Riverhead
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Herne Bay Yacht Club + Primadonna Update

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HERNE BAY YACHT CLUB

I love the above photo c.1930 of the Herne Bay Yacht Club, a lot of classes on show.
These days there is a better chance of seeing a helicopter taking off from that spot 🙂
15-06-2020 Input below from Robin Elliott

The photo of the boats from the Herne Bay JUNIOR Yacht Club (as it was known then) was taken probably 1933 not long after it was formed for boys under 18 and the location is the foot of George Dennes’s slipway at Sarsfield St, Herne bay.
George Dennes was the commodore and the only adult in the club. All other positions were held by the boys, who ran all the meetings. Vice Commodore Geoff Hodgson was 9, Rear Commodore Jim Faire, aged 13, Hon Sec Colin Dennes ages 16.

At first the boats were a mixed bag of local sailing dinks, the odd Zeddie, ‘anything with a sail’ and as you can see there in sail number 10, what looks to be a Zeddie with a bowsprit and jib.
In the winter of 1934, George Tyler built the 12-foot Silver Fern to an Arch Logan design for Colin Dennes. Others followed and the club consolidated around the new Silver Fern Class.

The administration experience gained from running their own affairs was put to good effect when many of the members, once they reached 18 years joined Richmond Yacht Club. By 1939, the RYC Commodore was Rupert Thorpe, Vice Comm Jim Frankham; Rear Comm Colin Dennes. All three HBJYC graduates and all under 21.

George Dennes died in 1942 and the Commodore’s role was taken over by Alf Thompson (Chad’s father) and continued until the Silver Fern’s demise around 1952, swept way by the new fangled Cherub, Moths and Pennant classes.

Notable yachtsmen, in no particular order, who came through the Silver Ferns were Laurie Davidson, John Lasher, Jim Faire, Des and Ray Hurley, Roy and Frank Dickson, Alan Barclay, Brian Woods, Des Townson, Murray White, Neville Thom, Shirley &amp; Roy White, John Taylor, Roly Moreland, John Peet ….. and on and on…..

It was a very important club in its time and its unique structure actually trained young yacht club administrators. No other club did that.

 

PRIMADONNA – Comes North
These days most woodys that you see on the back of Boat Haulage’s rig are heading south, so its great to see one arriving in Auckland. The 1910 ex whale chaser – Primadonna, arrived Friday afternoon at Pier 21.
A few days of TLC from new owner James Hutchinson and then she will be back in the water. Hopefully another candidate for the Anniversary Day Tug/Work Boat race on the harbour 🙂
She came with a lot of documentation from pervious owners, so when I sight that, hopefully we can establish / confirm her provenance.
Read / view more at this previous WW story https://waitematawoodys.com/2017/04/19/primadonna/
16-06-2020 Input from Peter Beech (petethedeep)

“We had the pleasure of care taking the old Primadonna for a number of years over 40 yrs ago, we did a lot of cruising and have many wonderful memories of her.
 She was powered by a 3 cyl water cooled Lister about 30 hp, being long and skinny with a beautiful counter stern , she ran like a skinny hogget, was good for 9 kts and was miserable on fuel. (less than a Gallon per hr.)
I’d like to comment on the issue of “hearsay history”, I remember researching the whakapapa of the Primadonna by talking to the descendants of original owner, Alf Baldick who farmed in Onapua Bay in Tory Channel.
His nephew Ian Baldick told me that his uncle had her built in 1913 by Ernie Lane.
During the Great War they whaled out of Te awai iti, I have an old photo of her along side a beached whale in Tar White. 
From memory there were 4 Baldick brothers, Alf, Herman and Darcy (twins) both stood 6 ft 4″ in their stocking feet ! and Billy Baldick who farmed on Blumine Island,( another sister Ida lived with him, ) Billy was reputed to have built 200 clinker dinghys on the island, selling them to Sounds farmers.
One of their sisters married a Guard, a descendant of Jackie Guard, ( the famous whaler) and another married a Jackson, of the Jackson Bay whaling dynasty, so whaling was very much in their blood.
I was talking to Hermans daughter Grace one day about the Baldick boats, she said –
“The old people are dead and gone but their boats live on”
She also said that their lives revolved around their boats, they were their daily transport, their farm boats, their fishing boats, they built many of them themselves and repaired and modified them.
She said that once a year they would all gather at Maraetai Bay, line their boats up and have a regatta! Alf had the Primmadonna, Herman and Darcey had the Greyhound and the Daphnee,  Billy had the Waiata .
I dont know what become of the Daphnee, the Greyhound  with her beautiful clipper bow and counter stern eventually rotted away, the Dreadnaught was built by Herman and Darcey for their sister Emma Guard, very similar to the Greyhound but Emma wanted more beam and draft for stability so they could carry farm produce over Cook Strait to the Wellington markets.
Last time I saw her she was in Wellington, not sure where she is now. Gracey told me that when they were planking her, towards the end they ran out of copper rooves so used Halfpennies. 
I have Billies old Waiata  at home here in the shed, she would be one of the oldest boats in the Sounds, built by Ernest Berg around 1900′ ish..  she is a pretty, double diagonal, straight stemmed, with a lovely counter stern, she originally had a Glouster stern, or cut off counter, Billy took her to Ernie Lane and said “put a descent counter on her.” (she is a real classic and for sale to the right buyer, who wants a restoration project.
Local people in my fathers generation used to tell stories, like folk legends about The Guards and the Baldicks, they were probably illiterate, they spoke with a real south of England Cornish drawl that was so distinctive, they lived a very isolated but fascinating  lifestyle.
So these are local oral histories, they are not researched to see if we have got our facts straight, the old lady was right, the old people are dead and gone and now their boats are well over 100 yrs old and wooden boats no matter what their condition are all restorable.
Unfortunately the old people never wrote down their stories and when boats outlive living memories they become fairy tales.
30 yrs ago I went around alot of the old timers and wrote down alot of their memories about the old Sounds launches and collected a lot of old photos, I’m pleased that I did that because all those old boys are dead and gone now.
Waitamata Woodys is doing just that in digital formate which is wonderful and should be encouraged because it ensures that the stories and the spirits of our old people in these wonderful craft live on”
Primadonna heads north
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WCW Riverhead June2020

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Te Kouma Woody Mooching

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TE KOUMA WOODY MOOCHING

Dennis Macconaghie sent in the above collection of photos from Te Kouma Harbour. Dennis had just finished a charter and in his words ‘did a quick flick around the harbour to take a few picks of some local woodys’. Many thanks Dennis also good to see what’s wintering on the Coromandel side.
I have to say the all white double-ender (1st photo) is very salty – anyone able to enlighten us more on her?
Input from Jim Lott
The ketch shown in the photos is Aorangi II, a Bert Woollacott 34 ft design (Ladybird?). She was built by Ron Evans who lived at Bucklands Beach out of full length kauri planks over frames, launched late 60’s. From about 1977 until 2017 she was owned by AAH (Hubert) Schulte of Howick and berthed at HM Bay. Around 1980 the original Kelvin engine was replaced with a Yanmar and centre line shaft.
LAUGHING LADY STRUTS HER STUFF
Always look forward to getting the email from WoodenBoat advising my digital copy of WB is available for download – so pleased to see James Dreyer’s Laughing Lady has made the front cover of the July/August issue – well done James and everyone that rubbed up against her during her restoration.
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WCW Riverhead June2020
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Lotus + Next Woody Event Details

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LOTUS

The photo above of the launch – Lotus comes to us from ‘Whangaroa County Old Photos’ (Gaylene Harrison) via Lew Redwood.
And that woodys is all we know – but I’m confident we will be able to shed some more light on the launch and her skipper – Alan Sanderson.
Input and photos below from Cameron Pollard – Cameron used to work on Lotus when she was owned by Grahme Kenyon. She was a longliner down in the viaduct. Fished for years by Vern Mcaw.
Input from Harold Kidd
This LOTUS was possibly the one owned by D Astwood in Auckland in 1935 and sold to V J Judd of Maungaturoto for use on the Kaipara in 1935. It certainly is the launch owned by Alan Sanderson, of the well-known Sanderson family of Totara North who used her for big game fishing out of Whangaroa from early 1946 on.
ITS BEEN TOO LONG BETWEEN DRINKS
Get the diary out woodys and circle Sunday 28th June for the next Woody Classics Weekend (#5) – we are off up the creek to The Riverhead, for a long overdue catch up and pub lunch. Flyer below.
Be a polite woody and RSVP with boat name and est. crew numbers so we can warn the tavern. Always a great trip, so rug up and give the boat a long over-due run.
Woody Classics Weekend #5 Riverhead

The Evolution of Pleasure Craft Communication

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THE EVOLUTION OF PLEASURE CRAFT COMMUNICATION

Next time you pick up a mobile phone to chat to another boat or log a trip report via the Coastguard APP, spare a thought for the boats of days gone by that had only one option (other than flags) for communications at sea. As a child I was fascinated by all these strange random words Zulu Mike Bravo Lima etc – my father being an ex-army comms man, morse was his thing. On holidays, myself and brothers were ‘made’ to listen to ships at sea and try to record the message, the winner i.e. most accurate, would win a chocolate.

WW follower Ken Ricketts is of an age that he has seen and experienced the evolution of New Zealand maritime radio communications and recently he wrote a comprehensive chronicle on the subject, which you will find below. It is worth a read to either educate or refresh yourself on the huge advances that have been made in the field. The story is peppered with a few tales directly relating some of our woody fleet (scroll over photos to ID the woodys) so hopefully that will keep those of you with a short attention span –  awake 🙂 Enjoy

Maritime radio-telephony in Auckland pleasure craft, had its first & humble beginnings in 1946, at which time, Ken’s father, Ralph Ricketts, entered the fray, with the second ever such installation, in Auckland, (the original first one was on the REHIA owned by Bill & Phyl Ryan at that time — who told RR about it) RR immediately bought, (as ultimately almost everyone did, once they knew about them ), an ex WW II war assets double side band, (DSB),  ZC1 MK II R.T., for  20 pounds, & fitted it to the Rickett’s launch – JULIANA, after which RR had a visit from a Govt radio inspector, who took diagrams of aerial format & layout, made various notes on his file of the installation, checked RR’s ability to use the set, made a test call himself, to “ZLD Auckland Radio,” sited  at Musik Point at that time, on the entrance to the Tamaki Estuary, & made sure RR had a “Restricted Radio Operators License,” which was required in those days, by all radiotelephone operators, on all pleasure craft, – now long since discontinued, & he allocated JULIANA the call sign of ZMYP.

REHIA 1948

JULIANA &amp; AOMA c1953

Originally, there was only one call frequency, & that was 2012Kh, in 1946, used for all purposes, but not too long after that, 2012  was reallocated exclusively for harbour control use, to the Auckland Harbour Board, & pleasure boaties were allocated 2182, the international distress frequency for initial calling to government shore stations, & 2162 for ship to shore working, & 2456 & 2638 for ship to ship gossiping. 

The 2162 working frequency, was later changed to a duplex frequency, with 2162 for listening to ZLD, & them receiving on 2207. 

The frequency of 2045, was allocated around 1950, for use for transmission between privately owned shore stations & boats, such has Port Charles Radio, (the legendary Jim Smith owner/operator ), Gt. Barrier radio , Awaroa Radio etc. 

These shore stations were used extensively, for many years, from around 1950, by many commercial fishing boats, working throughout the Gulf, many of whom, reported in daily their positions, usually around 6 pm. There were also many pleasure craft which used the service, & RR was one of them. He joined the Port Charles association for most of his boating life with legendary Jim Smith the owner/operator. RR or Ken would call Jim every evening at around 6pm & report in our position at that time. 

You paid a small annual fee usually, to join their non profit associations, to cover their running costs & they kept records of your locations, times of calls, assisted in any way they could, with any problems you may have had, etc., & these associations usually operated, for several set times, of about 15 to 30 minutes, each day. Ken thinks some may still exist on the VHF channels, possibly there is one on Gt. Barrier Island.  

Auckland Coastguard was also allocated the frequency of 2128, (from recall), for ship to Coastguard use. 

By the early 1950s ZLD had introduced a radio telegram service to land based recipients who had a telephone number available, as the address & the telegrams would be sent by ZLD to any entity via that phone number ( & later delivered in hard copy via normal post to the address of the phone number), & if a reply was quested, or anticipated, they would telephone it through immediately, whilst the ship waited on standby, & ZLD would call back with the reply ASAP. 

The cost, was fairly expensive for the era, & on a cost per word basis & the costs were charged to the landline phone number. This service stayed in place as far as Ken knows right through in to the VHF era.

Land based parties, could also send radio telegrams to boaties, with the address, via the P & T telegram phone number, which must include the call sign & was as follows; (as a example) Mr. Smith Vessel ZMYP JULIANA C/- ZLD AUCKLAND RADIO. 

ZLD at the end of its 3 or 4 hourly daily weather forecasts & shipping information, would give a list of all telegraphic traffic held for all vessels including of course, & very importantly, their call signs, & most would listen to these broadcasts, as often as possible, & advise friends on other boats, if they were near at the time, that  ZLD had a message for them.

By about 1983 this communication with the outside world was taken a step further, &  ZLD introduced a VHF radio telephone service, which many mature old time boaties may recall, where a ship could call ZLD, on channels 22 & 23, in the  Auckland region, give them a landline number, which they would dial & then patch your call to ZLD through, to enable you to talk direct, to the subscriber, which whilst it was a good service, it had its shortcomings & limitations, shall we say, as any boatie who by chance or otherwise, dialled into ch. 22 or 23 on his boat, would inevitably be privy to what were sometimes surprising, & very private conversations, also necessarily, only one party at a time in the conversation could speak, & the other had to listen, & one had to say “over,” at the end of each segment of conversation, to enable the other party to know when to respond, 

Calls to boaties from landlines could also be booked with ZLD & ZLD would call them back, when they were able to make contact the vessel, the land based party wished to contact.

There was one other form of radio communication which evolved & inevitably found its way in to the boating world for a period in the 1970s/80s & that was  Citizen Band (CB) radio transmitting communication equipment, for short distance communication, unrestricted in it use, & it could be used by any person, at any place for any lawful purpose, but it was restricted, to a very low aerial output power in all sets, which could be bought & licensed extremely cheaply, much more so, than proper marine  purpose built equipment, & this medium became popular for a period, in the  1970/80s, with some  boaties, mostly in the smaller cheaper craft range, where cost was a really important issue for some, but whilst it was cheap, it had many shortcomings, including its very short transmission range, & as there was no structured organisation of any type, either private or govt., monitoring it, one simply in event of distress, had to rely on someone within the range for your set, hearing your call, & helping as best they could, one way or another. So whist it was so very limited in its rescue value, nevertheless it was better than having no communication at all, if in need of help. 

These sets had a good number of preset channels  & operated on the HF 26.500 Mh band in NZ., which was a different frequency range to many other countries, including Australia, which used 27.500Mh), & call signs were allocated to owners on a regional basis, depending on where you lived.

Ken installed one on his 40′ launch TIARRI, when launched in 1979, in order to have maximum possibility of assisting boats, in times of distress or breakdown. TIARRI’S main call sign was ZM3199, which, along with the radio, Ken took from his first boat, FLYING SCUD, which was issued to F.S. in December 1953, when she was built & launched by Roy Lidgard, just after the advent of the letter number era – only 1100 numbers in to the new system.  

TIARRI

FLYING SCUD 1975

There were the very odd exceptions, to the above early days policy, & call signs, mostly around the 1940s era, almost all of which, were for boats, where they were owned by the owners of private islands, in the Hauraki Gulf & Northland, & perhaps the Sounds, where they had a licensed, private, island based set, on their island, & a special boat call sign allocated to their boats, for keeping in touch with their home bases, usually where these boats were their sole means of access, to the outside world, & these sometimes, were of a number letter combination, with just one or two numbers usually, & had just one specific frequency, to operate with.  

All transmitting in DSB & SSB sets was technically very accurately totally controlled, often by a plug in type internal “Chrystal Control unit,” or similar, for each frequency,& fitted to all sets for all transmitting frequencies. 

There were later several lower end of the High Frequency, (HF) band, frequencies added in the 3, 4, & 6, Mh bands, mostly used by off shore boats, out at sea. 

This cumbersome, & red tape process, of registration, continued for a good number of years, right through the initial era of “ Double side Band “ transmission, & in to the upgrading of that era, to “single side band” (SSB) transmission, circa 1970s

After single side band transmissions became compulsory, around the 1970s this required the purchase of a new set, & the only double side band frequency which was still legally usable, was the international distress frequency of 2182 Kh,  & this could only be used for calls to govt shore stations (ZLD for Auck)  or ZLW for Wellington, as examples),  for emergencies only, & craft which did not wish to outlay for a new SSB set, or alternatively still keep a 2182 set after they bought a VHF set after they were introduced, could modify & keep their old set, & were then reallocated a compulsory special “ZMX” based call sign, starting at ZMX2001.

These days ZLD has left Musik Point, & the government’s ZLD & ZLW (& ZLB in the South Island,) which all later came under the umbrella of Telecom, being the replacement that took over from the old P & T., which in turn, has now become a totally new entity, as “Maritime Radio,” & under the umbrella through various subsidiaries, to “Maritime NZ.,” being another different Govt Dept, with the  transfer becoming effective from midnight, & starting on the 1st October 1993 & the operators of which, are now all based in the Old Radio NZ Avalon building, in Avalon, Lower Hutt, Wellington, with transmission facilities, in Wellington & Taupo, plus a network of repeaters, scattered around the country monitoring the whole country, which is now all controlled from this one location.

In the later 1970s early 80s Very High Frequency, (VHF) maritime radio was introduced, which gave many benefits, with all its ongoing ever increasing refinements, & installation of shore based repeaters, on high ground, throughout the country, which  has now ultimately totally replaced the old Medium Frequency DSB & SSB sets, with many advantages to all users, for all local NZ & inshore boating, along with the discontinuation of licensing of individual operators, & inspections by govt inspectors, of all boats so fitted, with RT equipment. 

Also, Radio Spectrum Management, the govt department which these days controls allocates & administers all radio & TV transmissions, call signs & frequencies, has vested in NZ Coastguard, the authority to issue calls signs on its behalf, of a mixed letter number type, such as, (possible examples only), ZMQ 2947, ZMW4526, ZMR 2937, & so on, as a result of the huge demand for these, these days, & the time consuming process it used to be, for R.S.M.

Originally in 1946, this was all under the umbrella of the Post & Telegraph Department to later become Telecom, & remained so for many years, until 1987, when it all started to change & we have ended up, for a good number of years now, with RSM, as the entity in control.

The pleasure craft call sign evolution, & changes to it, are as follows;

As above, all craft up until c1953, were all 4 letters alone.

As they were beginning to run out of call signs, around 1953, the Govt. wrote to all pleasure craft owners, requesting they approve the replacement of their existing all letter call signs with a letter number combination, starting originally, with the first reissued call sign of ZM2001. 

It is important to note that the Govt., could not insist on this by law, & only request it, & if the owners did not consent to the allocation of a new call sign, the original then remained with the boat, & there are a few of boats that still have their original all letter call signs even today. 

Neither Ken’s father nor the owner/builder of GAY DAWN, Bill Waters, who RR bought the boat off in 1956, surrendered their original all letter call signs, for their respective boats, —  (see image above of GAY DAWN taken c1965, showing clearly, a typical DSB aerial set up as used for many of the DSB, SSB, medium frequency sets of that era), —  RR sold JULIANA in 1956 with ZMYP, (which was somewhere along the way, later either abandoned, or replaced, with letter number combo call sign), & now, as referred to below, is reinstated to her for life. RR bought in 1956 & sold in 1970, GAY DAWN, with ZMIV in place, which however, also later along the way, was replaced by persons unknown, with a letter number combo, at least once, note: ZMIV has now been reallocated to the Rickett’s family and used on the vessel ROSEANNE, which is owned by Ken’s daughter.

GAY DAWN C.1965

Such was the ever increasing size of the “snowball,” of pleasure craft sets, that it was not all that long, before the original issue of the ZM2001 to ZM9999 were all allocated, & we then saw the issue of  ZMA2001 to ZMA9999, followed by the final issue to the SSB era, which was ZMY2001 to ZMY9999. 

It is important to note, that all call sign issues right from ZM 4 letter, ZM+, ZMA, ZMY, & ZMX, & all Coastguard issued call signs are approved & provide for use of all VHF sets.    

All letter only call signs, which are all just 4 letters alone, must still be issued by R.S.M. direct, & are mostly reserved for all Govt vessels,(eg., all the Police DEODAR launches were & still are, all allocated ZMIH, during their term of service to the Police), also some very large off shore fishing vessels, & some NZ based pleasure boats, that cruise off shore, or are capable of cruising offshore have these call signs allocated as well. 

Other pleasure craft, that have some classic, historical, or other special significance, are also issued these, at the discretion of RSM.    

Ken has enjoyed a close & good relationship with RSM, for many years, & there are some interesting background stories relating to the issue of some of these special allocations of all letter call signs, which Ken has been associated with, & some of these are as follows. There are a tiny number of pleasure craft that were built prior to about 1953, where the owners did not approve replacing their original call sign, which the dept. would have requested, but could not insist upon in c1953. 

Two examples of this are as follows; 

One with its original 1946 issued call sign is RAKANOA, which still has her original call sign ZMTF as issued when new, & the other, is Owen Foster’s WAIRANGI, also with her original call sign of ZMTM.

RAKANOA c1948

WAIRANGI 2020

A fairly recent approval exception, is the issue of ZMPY, to Peter Loughlin’s Colin Wild built LADY MARGARET, which was first issued to her, in 1941, by the Navy, & is recorded as such on her British Ship registration, (see below), & as a classic craft, with this history of her call sign, Ken assisted Peter, to secure this for her for life, when he bought her.

LADY MARGARET

LADY MARGARET Registration certificate P1 (TOP) jpg

Likewise Francis Uren’s “W1”, was issued with ZMWI in 2014, which is another detective story. W1 was originally brought to NZ by the Royal New Zealand Air force in 1941, as their extremely fast, & prize patrol craft, & given in the circumstances, the logical Air force number of “W1”, which has now been reinstated to her, as her name, by present owner Francis, after a long period of being known as CARROMA.  

W1 c.1942

As she is now W1 again, Ken approached RSM, gave them her history, & they in turn, approached their counterparts in the military, to see if they could uncover her original WWII call sign, but unfortunately all those records have been lost, so as an alternative, RSM offered Francis the call sign ZMWI. – They could not offer ZMW1 as international radio spectrum law, prohibits that type of call sign, worldwide, so she now has ZMWI for life, free of charge.  

W1 2014 - 1

El Capitan is another interesting story, as she now has ZMEC. It goes like this; She was built c1961, by a farmer, in a shed on his farm, to a Chris Craft design, in Ohakea, & he carted her around on a big trailer, & used her at Taupo, & the Sounds, until 1976,  after which time, she sat in a shed on his farm, never to move again, until bought by Tony Mitchell, of Lake Rotoiti, off his estate, post 2000. When Tony bought her, she had a Coden 2+ Mh multi channel, medium frequency, marine RT,  which would have been fitted almost certainly, when she was new, which has now been replaced with a VHF, but for which, there had never been a marine call sign issued, as the original owner, was also a radio ham, with a “ZL#### ham radio licence & call sign, which automatically allowed him to use this call sign for his boat. Ken provided on Tony’s behalf, all relevant info to RSM, & requested, & they approved, ZMEC (El Capitan), which she also has for life.

EL CAPITAN 2012

Ralph Rickett’s JULIANA, now renamed MARJORIE ROSA, now also of Lake Rotoiti, has been reallocated for her life, her original call sign ZMYP, as issued to RR in 1946. Ken told RSM of her history, as the second ever pleasure craft in Auck., to have marine RT, in 1946, & they have approved the reissue to her of her original ZMYP, to Fraser Wilson, her present owner, for her life. 

Marjorie Rosa : Juliana 2019

Marjorie Rosa : Juliana 2018

Story told by Ken Ricketts, edited by Alan H.

Aquarius – Restoration Update

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AQUARIUS – RESTORATION UPDATE
I have done two previous WW stories on the 38’ Supreme Craft, 1955 built launch Aquarius. In September 2018 it was an SOS reaching out for someone to save her and bring her back from Waiheke Island where she had been hauled out for approx. 6 years. Then in April 2019 we reported that she was being trucked / ferried back to the mainland. WW links to those stories below.

https://waitematawoodys.com/2018/09/01/aquarius-sos/

Today I’m rapt to share the above work-in-progress photos ex Dave Brown and John Wright, who are restoring Aquarius. These boys are light on chat, they just get on with the work, which is impressive – we will continue to follow this project with great interest – well done guys 🙂
Photos below – first one is from 2018 and the bottom two are from the island ‘extraction’ in 2019.
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Parua Bay Woodys

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Waipeke

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Aveline

PARUA BAY WOODYS

Alistair McRae snapped the above woodys in mid May 2020 in Parua Bay, Whangarei.
The first photo is of Waipeke, once owned by Barbara and David Cooke. 30’ in length, built in 1963. Unsure of the builder.
The 2nd & 3rd are of the 23’, 1932, Ralph Shephard built launch – Mandalay. After a long period on the Clevedon River, Parua Bay is now her home.
The last photo is Aveline, the Roy Parris built launch. A new arrival in the Bay, owned by friends of Alistair’s.
Tomorrow on Woodys we have a great rescue story – a woody recovering from a near death experience 😉

Brin Wilson 1958 Classic Wooden Launch – Mandalay

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Brin Wilson 1958 Classic Wooden Launch – Mandalay

Today’s woody was designed by Brin Wilson and built in 1958 by Dave Jackson, so that makes her a special woody. Carvel planked and measuring 35’9” with a 11’1″ beam and drawing 2’11”.
She is powered by a Moon Engines – reconditioned (2000) Ford 120hp diesel, that sips 7L an hour at a cruise speed of 7>8 knots.
Anyone able to put a name to the boat. I understand her owner has had her for approx. 30 years. Its Mandalay (thanks Geoff Bagnall)

Tall Ships Regatta – Bay of Islands 2013/14

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Ranui

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Undine

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Colonist

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TALL SHIPS REGATTA – Bay of Islands 2013/14

 
Today’s photos come to us from professional photographer Dean Wright’s sailing archives and show a selection of woodys partaking in the annual BOI event.
Nice to see Ranui with all the washing on the line 🙂 , these days she tends to motor sail around the Hauraki Gulf.
 
There are not a lot of yachts these days that look even better out of the water – one such beauty is hauled out at Pier 21 in Auckland at the moment – Waitangi , designed and built in 1894 by Robert Logan Snr. Like most of these old girls, a killer for marina fees i.e. 36’ waterline but 58’ on deck – with a 74’ sailing carrying length. Photos below ex Larry Paul
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Royal Falcon Restoration – Update June 2020

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Royal Falcon Restoration Update June 2020

I had a reason to be pointing the car towards what used to be called ‘Nappy Valley’ (Pakuranga) so decided to call into the Panmure River boat shed where Steve & Colette Pople are having the 38’, 1934 Cox & Filmer built bridge-decker – Royal Falcon restored, ‘having’ isn’t the best word because both are actively involved in the project.
As you will see in the above photo gallery, the team are working at an impressive pace. The Commer TS3 engine is back in and looking very shinny. Very impressed to see the team re-purposing as much timber as possible – we like that 🙂
While there I dropped off an age appropriate search light that I had promised Steve, it didn’t suit Raindance so – ‘spread the love’. Thank you Jason Prew who gifted it to me originally 🙂
You can read / view Royal Falocn’s past at the link below + earlier project photos
Below is a video walk by/thru that I did. Have to say it is so cool to see a real, working, waterfront boat shed. Anyone remember something called ‘Heritage Landing’ aka the Vos Shed………….

Manaroa Bay (Lady Leila)

Manaroa Bay

MANAROA BAY (Lady Leila)

The above photo of Manaroa Bay was sent by Cameron Pollard. Cameron believes that she may be a reincarnation of a well known New Zealand built motor-sailer. Home these days is Australian.
Any one able to ID the graft stock?
Input from Gary Lidgard – Original name Lady Leila, designed and built by Roy Lidgard 1961, hull and decks at Kawau and fitted out at their yard at Bayswater. They sailed her to Sydney for the owner a retired Sea Captain a Mr London based on Sydney’s Pittwater. From memory this was probably their last new build at Kawau. This was a larger boat based on my grandfathers Rongamau, the owner had spotted her when he visited Kawau cruising in his then yacht and placed an order.
Remember When You Could Haul Out At Westhaven
Photo below is a blast from the past. I spent many days knee deep in mud sanding off and racing to apply very toxic anti-foul paint before the tide came back in. Captain Dennis Ross promised the youngest crew members that it was 100% safe……….. yeah right.
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Help ID This Boat
When I get an email that starts off by saying they are 29 years old and have just bought a wooden boat – I action it fast – we need to encourage the next generation 🙂
Michael van der Putte has just purchased the launch – Crystal Dean, pictured below on the Kaipara.
Michael has been told its a Carl Augustine design, but would like to get confirmation and if possible uncover any known history.
And my question – anyone able to tell us more about the green/red launch – Betsy, making a cameo appearance in the top photo below?
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Alpheus – A Peek Down Below + Lady Ava In Trouble

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ALPHEUS – A Peek Down Below

Alpehus has previously made a brief WW apperance and today we get to have a peek down below. The 42’ carvel kauri planked Alpheus was built in 1962 and launched in 1963, thought to be a McGeady design, built by Ben Hipkins.
Power is via a 120hp Ford diesel that gets her along at 8>9 knots.
From the photos (thanks Ian McDonald for the tme heads up) she is very well fitted out, a little ‘dark’ for my taste but who am I to comment 🙂
LADY AVA
I have been advised by Cameron Pollard that Lady Ava has had a wee opps.  A fine ship in her day, good enough to have caught the eye of Harold Kidd. Lady Ava, built in 1931 by Ernie Lane (Picton) was once named Miss Ava has popped up on WW b4, links below. + recent photos below.
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2006 – Mahurangi – Jason Prew

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Auckland Harbour – John Wright

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John Wright

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2015 – Panmure River – Jason Prew

Update – photos below taken by John Bullivant in Feb 2019 of LA on the Tamaki River.

Hudspith – Bay of Islands Game Boats

Marie J

Marie J – 1956 – 30′ Master-Craft

Venture

Venture – 1964 – 36′ – M.G. Palmer

HUDSPITH – BAY of ISLANDS GAME BOATS
David Clarke sent in the above photos of the Bay of Islands launches – Marie J (top) and Venture (bottom) that were both owned and operated by the Hudspith family (father Don, and sons Cyril and Norm) of Kaikohe.
Marie J was owned in the early 1960’s and moored in the Waitangi river on the piles. She was used mainly for game fishing in the BOI and Whangaroa areas with many days trolling over the Taheke reef for marlin. In the photo is David’s father, Colin Clarke, a regular crew member sitting on the cabin top left, beside him is Cyril Hudspith and in the cockpit is Tammy Weir another regular crew member.
The Marie J was sold in the mid 1960’s and in and around October 1966, the Hudspith’s family’s new launch Venture was purchased and brought up to the BOI.
She then spent the next 30 years or so mainly game fishing and Norm Hudspith was a prominent member of the BOI Swordfish Club and indeed the IGFA.
The photo of Venture shows her with a new clear flying bridge (added c.1968) and about to be launched at the BOI Yacht Club slip way in Waitangi after her annual haul out.
The Hudspith’s also installed a Perkins wing motor for trolling around 1968.
David commented that it was great to see that both vessels are still in very good condition, a credit to the owners.
Read and see more on Marie J 
Read And see more on Venture 
 

Valerie

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VALERIE 

In the above 1963 photo we see the launch Valerie towing an ex Whangarei Harbour Board shed to Port Whangarei, at the time river transport was judged to be the best option.

Input from Robin Elliott and Harold Kidd (previous WW story) – Valerie was designed and built by the  Lane Motor Boat Co. in 1929. She is 35’ in length with a 9’ beam. For many years she was owned by the Reynolds family, close friends of the Pickmeres, who owned her up until the late 1960’s. Apart from a short period in Auckland during the 1960’s she has spent almost all her life in Whangarei and the far North. It is believed Valerie was sometimes used by H. Pickmere when he was charting the far north.
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Launch day 29 August 1929 & Whangaroa 2013

I spotted her in December 2019 hauled out at the Opua marina getting a serious refit that included being re-powered with a Yanmar 115hp. Read / see more here
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Time – For Sale

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TIME – 4 Sale

Several years ago Bay of Islands woody Dean Wright shared with me a gallery of photos of a yacht built by his friend John Gander. At the time the photos were just for my eyes only, so they have been burning whole in the back-pocket ever since. Then one day out of the blue a marina buddy, mentions he has just bought a yacht that will ‘blow-my-mind’, tells me its called Time and he was a little disappointed to learn that I knew as much (if not more, at that stage) about her as he did.
Some background – the yacht Time was launched in 2001, having been built and designed by John Gander. John felled and milled the kauri for her planking in the Far North (photos below). John’s a very modest man and would want me to mention that a very large cast of helpers and trades people helped with the project and woodys it was a very large project – because John built two boats, the sister ship, Whisper is still owned by John.
Time’s specs are 38 ’x 12’ x 5’8” and she displaces 12 tonnes. Power is via a Yanmar 30hp diesel.
The standard of workmanship and design ergonomics are 2nd to none, you won’t here me say this many times but I could easily go to the dark-side (sail) with a boat like Time. On the water she is a knockout / head turner and down below just gorgeous.
After several years of ownership, a change in circumstances has bought Time on to the market. For anyone looking for a once in-a-life-time classic woody – Time deserves your inspection. Expressions of interest to waitematawoodys@gmail.com
Her owner is realistic in his sale exceptions, so Time will sell rather quickly.

Clarionet – Sailing Sunday

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Clarionet – Sailing Sunday

Today’s woody is the Chappelle designed schooner- Clarionet, seen here early one morning in Whangamumu, Northland getting ready to get underway.

The photo was taken in 2011 by Dan Wright.
I understand these days she calls Mahurangi home.
Update– more photos & details at this link
WoodenBoat Magazine Live Chat
Click the link below to join WB editor Matt Murphy in a live discussion with Reuben Smith. Reuben is boatbuilder and owner of Tumblehome Boatshop in the Southern Adirondacks town of Warrensburg, New York. The shop has restored some of the finest canoes, skiffs, guideboats, runabouts, launches, and one-design sailboats in the region. The conversation includes a ‘ walk-about’ of some of the shop’s past and present projects.

Shalimar

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Shalimar

I had Shalimar all lined up to be a mystery boat story and I received an email from Leane Barry advising that they had purchased the boat last week.
Shalimar’s past is a little cloudy as the previous owner (Andrew) purchased her off a deceased estate, with zero background on the boat. On board there is a small brass plate with the word ‘Jedda’, so maybe a name change at some time.
What we do know is she is 28’ in length, designed by William Atkinson c.1960. Powered by a Volvo 30hp diesel engine.
Check out the interior photos, at some stage she has had the hands of a good wood worker on her.
With some attention to the exterior she will be a smart entry boat into the classic wooden boating movement. I would paint the coamings a ‘varnished wood’ like colour, something similar to La Rosa (photo below) Or go all out and strip back and varnish which would look spot on.
Anyone able to shed some light on her background?
Harold Kidd Input – SHALIMAR was owned by KLE Upton of Merchant Ave Te Atatu South in 1973. He was a member of RNZYS. As far as the cutter at Okura is concerned, the Redvale Lime works were developed during and after WW1 by the Durey and (I think Pye) families. Driving home to Dairy Flat I drive along Durey Road to avoid the current road works bottleneck at the top of the Albany Hill. I haven’t been able to trace this vessel today.
La Rosa May2020

 

Mystery Work Boat Question

I have been asked by Ken Durey if we can ID the boat in the photo below – seen here landing lime in the Okura River in the late 1920’s. Behind the vessel, on the shed, is a sign ‘Redvale Agricultural Lime’.
Ken found the photo in a family box of photos belonging to his father. Ken’s sister (aged 89) suspects the boat may have been called ‘Joan Glide’.
Can we help put a name to the boat and any other details?
(nice looking clinker on deck)
Input from Ken Durey – Vessel was loading lime for delivery to Barrys Point Road gardens .
My Dad started Redvale Lime Co. from a small quarry 1km from the river.
He was also engineer on the Huia for a time and worked for Aspen Shipping Co. His first trip at sea was on the scow the Scot
Joan Glide?

Shandi

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SHANDI

I have lots of question re Shandi

1. Wood / steel
2. Work boat conversation or purpose but
3. Design / builder
4. Home port – Tauranga
5. Length, beam etc + engine
Update – Photo below appeared previously on WW, photographed by Dean Wright in Jan 2017, anchored at Mangonui – I was reminded of it by Craig Ogle
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Update  ex Ian MacDonald – Shandi is owned by the Sanderson family (Bruce & son Bruce Jnr.) Members of the Whangarei Game Fishing Club. Below is a link to a ’Northern Advocate’ article on Bruce Snr., check out the video.

A couple more of Sandi attached leaving Paroa Bay one morning, again ex Dean Wright
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Thanks Dean Wright for sharing the photo  – and the last question is for Dean – when are we going to see Arethusa with her new wheelhouse? My spies tell me its very close to an unveiling 😉
BOAT SHED TO RENT or BUY
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Shenandoah

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SHENANDOAH 
 
I was recently sent the top photo of the 1929 Chas Bailey & Son built launch Shenandoah, moored at Parua Bay, Northland. 
Sadly she appears to not be getting the TLC that an old lady of her pedigree deserves.
The last I heard of her she was still moored in the creek opposite the Te Atatu Boating Club,as seen in the 2nd photo above.
To remind us of how majestic she was back in the 1930’s I have attached a few photos below.
Message to the owner – if you want to move her on – I’ll find a buyer 🙂
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Arahi

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Arahi

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ARAHI

Today’s woody is the launch – Arahi, she made a brief appearance on WW back in December 2015, when Pam Cundy spotted Arahi moored in Tryphena Harbour at Great Barrier Island (photo below).
At the time there was considerable chat re her provenance but it was pretty well agreed that Arahi is an ex Auckland Harbour Board (AHB) survey hydrographic work boat, that finished with the AHB in the mid 1970’s.
On a recent dog walk around Westhaven Marina, I spotted Arahi on a marina berth, looking very smart.
Would love to hear what happened to her post her AHB days and learn more about what appears to be a recent restoration.
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Input from Cameron Pollard – Owned by Merv Young, powered by a Gardner 4LW.
3 photos below – Leaving barrier, then getting a helping hand home courtesy of mv Felicitare – in the shed getting a makeover.