About Alan Houghton - waitematawoodys.com founder

What is Waitemata Woodys all about? We provide a meeting point for owners and devotees of classic wooden boat. We seek to capture the growing interest in old wooden boats and to encourage and bring together all those friendly people who are interested in the preservation of classic wooden vessels for whatever reason, be it their own lifestyle, passion for old boats or just their view of the world. We encourage the exchange of knowledge about the care and restoration of these old boats, and we facilitate gatherings of classic wooden boats via working together with traditionally-minded clubs and associations. Are you a Waitemata Woody? The Waitemata Woodies blog provides a virtual meeting point for lovers of classic and traditional wooden boats.
 If you are interested in our interests and activities become a follower to this blog. The Vessels Featured The boats on display here (yes there are some yachts included, some are just to drop dead stunning to over look) require patrons, people devoted to their care and up keep, financially and emotionally . The owners of these boats understand the importance of owning, restoring and keeping a part of the golden age of Kiwi boating alive. The boats are true Kiwi treasure to be preserved and appreciated.

Oyster – Sailing Sunday

OYSTER – Sailing Sunday

The photo gallery above of the 1903 Charles Bailey Jnr. yacht Oyster comes to us from her new Wellington owner – Gavin Pascoe’s fb page. Gavin recently sailed her back from Lyttelton to Wellington. Gavin is one of the leading lights at the uber cool Wellington Classic Yacht Trust, so Oyster is a very lucky woody to be in such safe hands.

Most of the photos are from her early days in Wellington c.1920’s>1930’s. The cover of the NZ Yachtsman magazine is dated August 10th 1912 and shows her in Nelson. Oyster is 32’ in length, with a 9’ bean and draws 3’ (she is a centre-board ketch).

Photo below taken by Andrew McGeorge of Oyster in Lyttelton just prior to her departure north.

Jack Logan Would Be Happy

JACK LOGAN WOULD BE HAPPY
Back in November 2020 we reported that Lake Rotoiti boatbuilder Alan Craig (Craig Marine) had taken on the restoration of the 1956 Jack Logan built 17’ clinker cabin run-about – Sea Spray. The WW link below will show you the boat as Alan received it.  https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/11/14/sea-spray/

I can report that Alan’s yard are well under way with the project, as you can see in the above photos, once the reciprocating saw comes out there’s no turning back. Alan commented that most ribs were repaired and structure added. Her shape was pretty bad, had a chine in it almost. A few planks to replace on the bottom then into the cabin. Looking forward to following this project – just need to keep reminding Alan to send in the updates 🙂

Classic Boats Wanted + Classic Regatta – All You Need To Know

CLASSIC BOATS WANTED

If the old sign in a brokers window and a thumbnail photo in a monthly brochure isn’t working for you – contact the Wooden Boat Bureau – there are 2 simple differences between the Wooden Boat Bureau and other boat brokers:

1. We actually sell classic boats.

2. We have a list of buyers wanting to buy a classic wooden boat


So woodys if you are trading up or trading down/out of the market and have a woody in good condition – drop us a line at waitematawoodys@gmail.com for a confidential chat.

(Sorry for the brazen commercial message today, but my wife tells me we need a bigger boat)

CYA 2021 ABD GROUP Classic Yacht Regatta 

The CYA 3 day Classic Yacht Regatta starts tomorrow (Saturday), and finishes on Monday – all the details you need to know here https://classicyacht.org.nz/events/2021-classic-regatta/

To view previous years regattas – links below
2020 https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/03/09/2020-new-zealand-classic-yacht-regatta-photo-gallery-100-photos-and-videos/
2019 https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/03/02/cya-classic-yacht-regatta-2019-race-1-37-photos/
2018 https://waitematawoodys.com/2018/02/19/cya-classic-yacht-regatta-2018/

Whats Happening With Caprice

Whats Happening With Caprice

The launch Caprice has made numerous appearances on WW over the years – back in 2013 she was for sale for approx. $30k and again in 2018 for $10k. In January I was contacted by Brett Stanaway who sent me the two photos above of Caprice moored in Mill Bay, Mangonui, Northland. At the time Brett commented that he found the tumble home in the stern quite pronounced for an old timer like that. I believe she is 34’ in length and powered by a 60hp Fordson diesel. Type Caprice in the WW search box & to see more photos, there has been a lot of speculation as to her designer/builder.


In the photos she is looking a tad neglected and crying out for some TLC. Do we know if she sold back in 2018 or still with the same owner? The bones are there of a nice woody – it would be a shame for her to deteriorate to a condition that would rule out anyone taking her on as a restoration.


Can we get an update on her status – if its still for sale, would be nice to find a new owner.

Hinera

HINERA
Alan Sexton contacted me the other day concerning Hinera, the Roy Steadman designed / Shipbuilders built 38’ launch. Alan believe that she may have been the last boat built by Shipbuilders. She appeared on the cover of ‘Boating World’ October 1971 edition – copy of article below.

Alan has commented that you can see her obvious lineage from Fiesta, Romany II et al. And maybe built to a budget as the rubber mouldings securing the windows, more appropriate for caravans and fizz boats, did not exactly enhance her.

As launched power was from twin T6 – 354 Perkins that gave her a top speed of approx. 20.5 knots and cruised at 17.9 knots. Alan recalls she was berthed on I pier at Half Moon Bay when first launched, all launches moored bow-in in those days, and her heavy stem and huge flare looked very imposing to an 11 yr old.

Hinera went off Alan’s radar round the 1970’s, do we know what became of the launch?

Ruru

RURU
I spotted the launch Ruru at the recent Lake Rotoiti Classic and Wooden Boat Parade, it would have been hard to miss her – she is such a perfect lake boat. The name Ruru has several meanings in Maori but the most common one is – the name for NZ’s native Morepork bird. On her stern it lists her home as Tapuaekura, which is a bay found on the southern shores of Lake Rotoiti. 

The brief sneak peak I had of her interior indicated a very tasteful and age considerate restoration, very original. Her owner is a very passionate classic owner, with several craft on the lake. Would love to learn more of Ruru’s provenance and when she was restored. 

Update – Nathan Herbert to the rescue – he is better than the WW search box 🙂 https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/07/22/ruru/

25-02-2021 Update ex Alan Craig (Craig Marine) – I had a look at RURU for George Joseph last year, its been in his shed for 20 years, George had had it for 60 odd years and previously was owned by someone who owned most of the land between moose lodge and the Marae. The Austin trident engine got taken out 20 years ago and never made it back in and got as far as the end of the shed! until now obviously. She’s a nice looking boat, 19′ long, mahogany hull and kauri top. Couldn’t find a builder’s plate but guessed it’s around 1930s or 40s? Built well with seam battens and ribs, the planks had hardly moved.
Any idea of the builder is the question…..

Manu Moana

MANA MOANA


Built in 1975 at the Salthouse yard using 3 skin kauri. Powered by twin 425hp Detroit diesels, giving a max speed of 16knots and cruise of 10 knots. Mana Moana  at 59’ in length, has a 18’ beam and draws 4’9″ but what sets her apart from most other woodys of the that length is the volume – she is huge – as an example – 3 cabins, 3 heads and 4 showers.

Originally built for the German Consul and then skippered and bought by John Pulham from Tauranga. Ken Winter was the next owners from 1982 > 1992. 
(Tech & ownership details supplied by Allan Winter via K Ricketts) 

AUCTION OF VINTAGE NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS

Chris McMullen gave me a heads up on a very special auction of vintage nautical instruments taking place tomorrow at the Cordys auction house.The items are from The Harvey Sheppard collection, a close friend of Chris’s – Link below to website / catalogue. https://www.cordys.co.nz/auctions/D002/catalogue

Whats So Special About Wooden Boats

https://vimeo.com/510393350/c94b7f0bfa?fbclid=IwAR0t66rtvtC1dcsHl2zFnsmmCEQpyW0XcLdeafmw33GjFLJksY1U5Zg_Jb0

Whats So Special About Wooden Boats
The above video by Tom Nitsch, featuring Tom’s stunning camera skills, gives a very cool insight into why in this modern age so many people are committing so much time and money restoring and enjoying wooden boats. 
The interviews with Donn Costanzo from the Wooden Boatworks yard and John Lammerts van Bueren (sailor, boat builder, author) really capture the why – something a lot of us struggle to communicate when asked by people outside the wooden boating movement.I have reproduced some of John’s comments below –

 “Most of all I think that a lot of the people who sail classic boats and enjoy the classic boats are probably more bonded than the people who sail modern boats. Nothing bad against the modern boats but modern boats are usually fiercely competitive and there is not as much love for the boat for what it is, the love is for the performance, the speed you get out of it and your chance to win the boat race. Something that people have in common is they have a drive to create and re-create and preserve and not to consume and I think that that is something very essential. If you are driven by consuming you aren’t able to create and re-create and preserve as much as you need to do to love these classic boats, and in a way the beauty of the boats that you are working with. You look at the old boats and in many ways they are compared to modern boats not as mush as a statement of your personal wealth, they are statement of beauty and it doesn’t really matter whether is a Dragon with varnished topsides or whether its a cruiser or a meter or a great big schooner, no matter how large these great big schooners are they are a statement of beauty and not a statement of wealth, all though they are incredibly expensive, it doesn’t really matter – they are beautiful and people appreciate it.”

You can see more of Tom’s work here http://www.tomnitsch.com

SS Dancer

SS DANCER 
During the recent Lake Rotoiti Classic and Wooden Boat show I spotted the steam boat – Dancer, her owner and builder John Olsen supplied the following details. 

Dancer is a 30 foot long steam launch, designed by Peter Sewell and built by John and his wife Diana. The engine is a compound twin, designed by A.A Leak and built by John. The boiler is a 3 drum type.designed by Andre Pointon. (Colonial Iron Works) and also built by John apart from welding by a certified welder. In the top photo, the tender on the Aft deck is a folding dinghy, called Kahikitea and mostly built from that timber.


Dancer is equipped for sleeping aboard, with a head compartment and blackwater tank, a small galley with gas cooker, sink, and fridge, and solar panels on the cabin top to provide electric power. The boiler is fired with diesel. Myself I like wood/coal fired but her diesel set up must make life a lot simpler, and we like that 🙂

Can We Identify The Launch + Worldwide Classic Boat Show

Can We Identify The Launch

The above Bay of Islands photo comes to us via Diane Keene’s post on fb and is from the photo album of her grandmother – Joyce Simpson. The grandmother’s diaries indicate that the photo was taken on 6th Feb 1963, and the primary focus of the photo was the submarine. Diane has checked with the RNZN & they have informed her it is either the submarine HMS Andrew which attended the 1960 Waitangi Day ceremonies, or of the submarine HMS Tapir which was present in 1963 when HM Queen Elizabeth was in attendance aboard HMY Britannia.


Putting subs to one side, Dianne enquired about the identity of the launch on the left – if my life depended on it I would say – Menai, the 1937 built Sam Ford launch, but there is no mast and she seems to have always sported one, as a second option I would say – Ian Gavin’s family launch – Florence Dawn, built in 1947 by Richard Hartley. Anyone agree or have another suggestion?

THE WORLDWIDE CLASSIC BOAT SHOW – Feb 19>28
created by the folks at Off Center Harbor

This is very cool and worth checking out – there will be hundreds of the world’s finest boats, each with its own web page with photos and description + interviews with top boat builders, museums, sail makers, festivals, etc. Effectively everything happening in classic boats around the world, all in one place.

Location:  Online at ClassicBoatShow.com
Tickets:  $5 (seriously)

THE “WHY?” BEHIND THE SHOW:
When the pandemic started the festivals, schools, yards, and museums that are the lifeblood of the classic boating world began shutting down for distancing. 
At that moment, Off Center Harbor committed to utilize our worldwide
audience to highlight those doing great work and bring everyone in the world of classic boats closer together.
That dream becomes a reality with the Worldwide Classic Boat Show.

HOW IT WORKS:

Purchasing a digital “ticket” provides you full access to the Boat Show’s website during the 10 days of the Show.  It gives you full unlimited access to everything, including the live presentations. Live presentations will be recorded and available for the entire show beginning the day after the presentation (maybe sooner). There are no physical paper tickets — as you check out and pay, you’ll choose a username and a password for logging in, and that login will be your “ticket” to the show (so write it down).

BUY A SHOW TICKET HERE