About Alan Houghton - waitematawoodys.com founder

What is Waitemata Woodys all about? We provide a meeting point for owners and devotees of classic wooden boat. We seek to capture the growing interest in old wooden boats and to encourage and bring together all those friendly people who are interested in the preservation of classic wooden vessels for whatever reason, be it their own lifestyle, passion for old boats or just their view of the world. We encourage the exchange of knowledge about the care and restoration of these old boats, and we facilitate gatherings of classic wooden boats via working together with traditionally-minded clubs and associations. Are you a Waitemata Woody? The Waitemata Woodies blog provides a virtual meeting point for lovers of classic and traditional wooden boats.
 If you are interested in our interests and activities become a follower to this blog. The Vessels Featured The boats on display here (yes there are some yachts included, some are just to drop dead stunning to over look) require patrons, people devoted to their care and up keep, financially and emotionally . The owners of these boats understand the importance of owning, restoring and keeping a part of the golden age of Kiwi boating alive. The boats are true Kiwi treasure to be preserved and appreciated.

Lady Gay Australian Holiday

LADY GAY – Australian Holiday Postcard
Almost a year to the day we reported that the 1935, Colin Wilde designed and built launch – Lady Gay was holidaying in Australia. Recently LG’s current custodian (their words) Graeme Wilson, wrote in and advised that LG was tucked up safely at marina in Sydney. Graeme commented that she has seen a constant stream of onlookers since she arrived in Sydney with many intrigued to hear of her history and how she has come to be in Sydney, and that she is holding her own when alongside woodys in Australia. 

Graeme has been cruising her mainly in Port Jackson waters with COVID and politics having thwarted plans to head to Queensland for the foreseeable future.  Sadly with the Wooden boat show in Tasmania cancelled for 2021, for the same reasons, he is hopeful of taking LG south for the show in 2023.  

Graeme wrote that Lady Gay is particularly well suited to the upper reaches of Port Jackson, Pittwater and the Hawkesbury.  Two weeks ago they enjoyed a lovely spring cruise up in the Hawkesbury and Smiths Creek and plan to return in a few weeks to explore further upstream to Wisemans Ferry and Berowra Waters.

Waipa + Boat Boot Sale

WAIPA + BOAT BOOT SALE 
Baden Pascoe recently sent in the above photo of the workboat – Waipa and commented that she was owned by Ray Bronlunds and if his memory is correct, Logan built. Wait brings back many memories for Baden, having helped his father, Howard, and Ray cut the box shed off her. This would have been back in the days Baden wore short pants i.e before school days and he was helping them do odds and ends. Then Howard Pascoe built the configuration as in the above photo. Back then s.he had a Perkins P4 and went like stink. With in a year Ray and Waipa were no 1 cray boat in the Bay taking the crown off Ronomor and Norma. Do we know what became of Waipa?

Left, A young Ray Brondlund and Don Ross on
board coaster Lady Jocelyn . Without any question two cornerstones of
Whitianga commercial boating and absolute gentlemen. Just to add Ray is a
former owner of the lovely Waione.


BOAT BOOT SALE NEXT SUNDAY (18TH) – ARE YOU ATTENDING?
If so, make life easier for everyone and drop us an email so we know how many sausages to buy 🙂

MORE DETAILS BELOW
Lets be honest, we all collect / hoard boat bits. Could be a good time to gain some more space and earn a few dollars.Waitematawoodys and The Slipway, Milford are hosting a boat boot sale on Sunday 18th October at their boat yard in Milford, Auckland. Details below.So woodys, be brave and get together anything boat related that you think needs a new home and bring it along on Sunday 18th (10.00>11.30am) – to stop some ponker turning up with an alloy mast – there is only one rule – items must fit in a car boot 🙂 But we will make an exception for grandad’s kauri clinker dinghy.Its a big shed but space will be limited so drop me an email to reserve some space  waitematawoodys@gmail.com
As its the day after the General Election – I’ll either be in a good mood or very grumpy. AND IT IS CASH ONLY.

Mystery Launch 09-10-2020 (White Cloud)

MYSTERY LAUNCH – 1968 Sam McGreedy
The above 39’ carvel planked, 1968 launch popped up on trademe, light on photos, the tme ones are very average. The stated builder is Sam McGreedy, thats a new one to me.Power is from a 130hp Ford diesel. Appears to be well fitted out.

From the photos I suspect it a Panmure boat – can on of the river rats enlighten us more on the boat?

That was easy, thanks Ken R – its White Cloud see more here 

https://waitematawoodys.com/2013/11/18/white-cloud/

Also video of launch day

https://waitematawoodys.com/2017/06/10/white-cloud-movie-leaving-the-shed-launch-day/

HOST VENUE: NZ Traditional Boatbuilding School 17 Totara Rd, Te Atatu Peninsula, Auckland – Saturday 17 October 2020 – Sunday 18 October 2020

This is a two day course introducing you to the use of hand tools. Over the two days you will build a small tool box and a bench stop incorporating a number of woodworking joints and skills including cutting a simple scarf joint and then using copper nails and rivets to turn that piece into a handy Bench stop. Marking and cutting pieces for the tool box, preparing the timber with planes and a cabinet scraper, marking and cutting a dovetail joint, marking and drilling dowel joints, turning a square piece of wood into a round handle, final assembly and clean up.

This is a great course for someone wanting to learn how to cut accurately and use chisels and planes and other hand tools in a practical manner. Students will leave with a completed toolbox and bench stop and an introduction to many new skills. The tutors for this course are Olaf Wiig and Allan Hooper.

NOTE: Min of three students required, max of six students- COST $290 – includes materials for toolbox.

Click link for more details on NZTBS + space bookings http://nztbs.org.nz/course/an-introduction-to-fine-woodworking/

Arcturus- New Owner Update

ARCTURUS – An Update
Recently WW was contacted by Annie Bryce who along with her partner bought the 33’, 1952 McGeady launch – Arcturus a couple of months ago. Annie advised that they have put her on the hard and sanded her hull back which was in good condition, re-painted and anti-fouled Her topsides have been painted and they are addressing a few window issues. The engine has had a few minor repairs and the next stage is a full interior re-do.  Annie commenced that Arcturus is a lovely launch and they are keeping her in the Sounds at Waikawa marina.


Annie would appreciate any information the WW readers may have on Arcturus, its a mystery how an Auckland boat ended up so far south.


You can see and read more here from a 2019 WW story https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/03/18/a-mystery-launch-3/

A Peek Inside Six Boathouses + Next On-The-Water Woody Event

A Peek Inside Six Boathouses + Next On-The-Water Woody Event
Every year The New Hampshire Boat Museum, runs a fundraising event in the form of a ‘guided’ tour of boathouses on their local lakes – this year due to CV-19 rather than cancel the event, they want with a virtual concept. I think its very cool, the use of a drone to film the approach to the locations  and meet the owner interviews is a winner.

Sadly you can not fast forward, you have to watch the whole tour but you can halt it and start again where you left off.At the end of the video is a link to donate if your were feeling that way inclined 🙂 Enjoy.

Click on blue text above and then scroll down and click to play


WOODY CLASSICS RIVERHEAD LAUNCH CRUISE – SUNDAY 8 NOVEMBER – RSVP NOW

RVSP To waitematawoodys@gmail.com  Boat name and est. number of crew

RSVP – boat name & est number of crew to waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Rehutai + Woody Boat Yard Boot Sale

REHUTAI + Woody Boat Yard Boot  Sale

Sunday night I was scratching the head thinking what Tuesday’s WW story would be and ping – I get an email from Sally Verbiest inquiring about her grandfather’s, Roy Barton, Sam Ford built launch – Rehutai. Roy lived in the Wairarapa when he owned the boat, unfortunately Sally doesn’t know the dates, but Roy dies in 1968, in his early eighties. 

The photo above is from an old family album and Sally thinks it was taken in Queen Charlotte Sound. The rather lovely cartoon, was drawn by a friend of Sally’s father – a depiction of Roy, whose main retirement hobbies were boating and polo. He must have been a great guy 🙂


Sally has asked that if current owner Tony Whyman? or anyone that knows him, could contact WW (via the comments section) as Sally would like to see these items reunited with the the boat.
You can see and read a lot more on Rehutai here   https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/04/12/the-restoration-of-rehutai/


WOODY BOAT YARD BOOT SALE

Lets be honest, we all collect / hoard boat bits. Could be a good time to gain some more space and earn a few dollars.

Waitematawoodys and The Slipway, Milford are hosting a boat boot sale on Sunday 18th October at their boat yard in Milford, Auckland. Details below.

So woodys, be brave and get together anything boat related that you think needs a new home and bring it along on Sunday 18th (10.00>11.30am) – to stop some ponker turning up with an alloy mast – there is only one rule – items must fit in a car boot 🙂 But we will make an exception for grandad’s kauri clinker dinghy.

Its a big shed but space will be limited so drop me an email to reserve some space  waitematawoodys@gmail.com
As its the day after the General Election – I’ll either be in a good mood or very grumpy. AND IT IS CASH ONLY.

RSVP TO BOOK SPACE TO waitematawoodys@gmail.com

The Refit of Windborne

The Refit Of Windborne
Today’s story is on the schooner – Windborne, by John Gander, via Dean Wright, John and family refitted and owned Windborne for many years. Its a great read by one of our best woody boatbuilders. I’ll shut up and just let John tell the story – enjoy, I did 🙂 Remember – to enlarge a photo, just click on it 😉

‘Windborne’ was built in 1928 by Cornish boatbuilders Gilbert and Pascoe at their yard in Porthleven and launched as the cutter ‘Magnet’ after launching she took part in the Fastnet yacht race. She again raced in the Fastnet in 1930 but this time re rigged as a schooner, and has continued with this rig.

On sailing to the United States her name was changed to ‘Huguenot’ and registered in San Diego. On being purchased by the Charleson’s a Canadian family from Vancouver, the owner wanted to retain the name Huguenot and she was renamed ‘Windborne’ a very fitting name for her, and she was Vancouver registered. On sailing her to the U.S. port of Blaine just south of the Canadian border Mike and his wife Karol began getting Windborne ready for a voyage to the south Pacific.

The family visited many Pacific islands during their cruising and then headed for New Zealand and on the last part of the voyage encountered heavy weather and Windborne suffered some damage to her bulwarks and rigging. Being designed on the lines of the Bristol Channel pilot cutters and soundly built she is a very sea kindly vessel and delivered the family safely to Auckland.

Bev and I had not long completed ‘Deepstar’ and were planning on building a large sailing craft for our family use, however time was getting on, so before it was too late and our children left home we decided to look around for a suitable vessel. We were introduced to Windborne on her mooring at Herald Island and went for an afternoon sail with the Charleson family, and could see she was worth and deserved an extensive refit.

Her planking is Pitch Pine on sawn Oak frames fastened with galvanised soft iron spikes, I was not familiar with these timbers in our Picton boatyards so flew back to Picton to talk with Peter Jorgensen at his Waikawa boatyard. Pop as he was affectionally know, with his years of experience in Danish boatyards was of course very familiar with these timbers, iron fastenings and European construction, and his knowledge was very helpful when I surveyed her as I did on returning to Auckland and putting her on the grid at Westhaven.

We took possession on the last day of July 1980 and made ready for the voyage to Picton and with a capable crew we sailed from Auckland on the 7th of August. Winter is not the always the best time to head down the east coast and it was somewhere off East Cape that we found that the forward skylight was only held in place by the shiplap joint and no through bolts. With a couple of sections of bulwarks missing and a good sea running this deficiency was made evident, and the hand bilge pump showed it’s worth. I always sail with a fairly comprehensive tool kit and with a selection of fittings and fastening in the ships inventory the skylight was secured in place.

To undergo the refit I planned, we needed to have Windborne undercover and were fortunate to find we could have the use of Finn Jorgensen’s big shed at the Waikawa yard for a limited time before it was required for their next commission. On the 24th of December we hauled out and made ready to have the masts lifted out, and started the job of burning off the topside paint. As is often the case fastenings deteriorate around the waterline area but it was not possible to pull the old spikes out of the oak frames so additional galvanised ship spikes were driven adjacent to the original’s, two planks below and three planks above the waterline.

On the last day of December ‘Windborne’ was hauled up into the shed ready for the major refit, and what better way to spend new years day for a family than to spend it working with earnest tearing up the canvas like material covering the decks, I was suspicious that this was laid over the 2 inch Baltic Pine decks because of leaks, the ruination of many fine vessel’s. I was relieved to find the timber was in a good state of repair so the decision was made to retain the deck. Removal of the deckhouse was fairly quick and easy but more time was required to remove deck fittings, deck prism’s, and other deck furniture until we had a clean flush deck. The bulwarks were fastened to grounds over the covering boards with the frames extending to the cap, this is an area of potential leaks. On removing the damaged bulwarks and beltings and sawing off the frames at deck level, the new bulwarks were to be fitted on the outside of the sheer strake as was our practice at the Carey yard.

Next we moved below decks, unfortunately in later years any original furniture and fittings had gone to be replaced with ply, paneling and some pegboard, hardly befitting a traditional yacht, however we did expose the original tonnage and tonnage exemption carvings by removing layers of paint from the deck beams so we had something from her past. I had planned the layout we required so removed all bulkheads and the hull lining. This gave a good opportunity to make a thorough inspection from bilge to deckhead.

While I was fitting new bulkheads, Bev and our boys Wayne and Neville, began removing the rigging and paint from the spars. As is common in these vessel’s cast iron ballast is set in concrete between the floor timbers, however she also carried 2,775 lbs of lead ingots. At some time Windborne had been hauled out on a two bearer slip cradle and for a thirty five ton vessel this was grossly insufficient, the result was that she had damage to the underside of her wooden keel, so I made a casting box and we used the lead ingots to cast a blast keel to replace the damaged section. I next dressed off and sanded the the Baltic Pine decking and laid marine ply using epoxy glue to, and over the outside of the sheer strake.

By late February we were ready to start the new bulwarks and to help with our time schedule Finn offered me the use of one of his men, I chose Keith Hansen, Keith had learned his trade at the Jorgensen Boatyard and Keith and I worked well together ( I hope he still agrees with my comment ). We started on the Bulwarks using double diagonal Matai with a hardwood stringer, followed with new hardwood beltings.

Laying the 5/8” teak deck was a slower job, I don’t like decking laid straight fore and aft and wanted to follow the deck plan as far as practical and run the decking into the king plank in the traditional manner and this means edge setting the deck planking. We departed with tradition when it came to caulking the seams and used thioflex polysulphide with the accompanying mess that follows while the product cure’s. Next it was onto fitting the new Teak Cap and Taff rails. The new deckhouse was built on Kauri coamings and sheathed in glass cloth, all other deck furniture is Teak.

As our time in the shed was limited I was fortunate to be able to engage Bob Clerke a ships joiner, I delivered a load of teak at Bob’s workshop, and with measurements and patterns Bob set to and made skylights, hatches, a magnificent saloon table and other fitments to help with my fit out below decks all done in Teak and Kauri. The topsides were recaulked and my daughter Shirley stopped the seams with white lead putty in preparation to repainting. By the beginning of May the new look ‘Windborne’ was out of the shed.

Masts were stepped with an English silver coin dated 1928 under her main mast and a Canadian coin under the foremast, and on the 6th of May at H.W. she was sent down the rails but remained in the cradle, the summer had been hot and dry and we had pumps ready, next day with a bit of oakum caulking in a couple of seams she was ready to leave the cradle and lay alongside the wharf at our boat shed to complete the fit out below decks.

A year or so later I removed the Isuzu engine and replaced it with a 4 LW Gardner. For the following eighteen years ‘Windborne’ carried our family on many adventures in all sorts of conditions. Roger Carey told us boys that wooden boats are built of living things, and every wooden vessel has a soul, I strongly believe this.

This last few weeks I have I have visited ‘Windborne’ out on the hard at Whangarei receiving care and attention from her owner Avon, he is doing a good job she’s looking good, being well ventilated and with salt water over her decks, the best thing ever.

The Rebie – V55 – Sailing Sunday

THE REBIE Y55 – Sailing Sunday
David Campball-Morrsion sent in the above photo of the mullet boat – The Reble, which David’s father in law and a couple of mates owned before the war, his name was Arthur Coughlan (Buster) and they kept her in St Marys Bay in Auckland. The bridge motorway put paid to that area years later.The Reble had the skull and cross bones on the main as in the photo.
Buster played for Ponsonby Rugby Club and became a NZ Barbarian just before the war and became a Ponsonby life member and an Auckland rugby selector, also an active member of the Ponsonby Cruising club.


After the war Buster and family moved to Dunedin for ten years which he claimed was his sentence, they then moved back to Auckland to take up the position of personal manager at Pacific Steel when it opened. David would take him out a number of times on the family yacht, then in their launch Arima, but David commented that fishing in his tinny at Coromandel was his love in his later years.


David is keen to learn what became of The Rebie post the Arthur Coughlan (Buster) ownership period. 


Big WW milestone yesterday, the odometer clicked past 6,000,000 views – I got so excited when it went into 4 digits, used to check it every 1/2 hr to see how many and who was visiting the site 🙂 


 Can we put Russell Ward out of his misery? Russell sent in the 2 photos below of a boat named Silver Spray, that dropped anchor on Friday night below him, in Scotts Bay /Landing – from the distance she appeared to be approx. 40’, with a counter stern, slightly Wild Dock looking. Any one know the boat?

Silver Spray when an Island Bay fishing boat launched c. 1938 (photo ex Baden Pascoe)

A Woody For The Lake Boys

A Woody For The Lake Boys
Kiwi woody Mark Erskine gave WW the heads up on Miss Tessa, currently for sale in the USA. This would have to be a great buy for one of the Lake Rotoiti gang, current bidding is sub US$6k.


Miss Tessa is a 1930 Dodge* 16’ runabout with two cockpits separated by an engine compartment. The boat features a planing, seam-and-batten mahogany hull with spruce stringers and oak frames. Power comes from a Lycoming inline-four, and additional features include a forward/reverse transmission, double-planked bottom, two-piece windscreen, and blue vinyl upholstery. The Lycoming marine inline-four engine is mounted amidships and produced approximately 45hp when new.The boat was found hanging in a barn by the previous owner, who commissioned a restoration before donating the vessel in the early 2000s to the seller, the Tahoe Maritime Museum. Comes with a very cool trailer, which I imagine is only for off road use.
*Horace E. Dodge Boat Works was started by Horace Dodge Jr., the son of Dodge automobile company co-founder Horace Dodge


View and read more here https://bringatrailer.com/listing/1930-dodge-runabout/

Classic Wooden Boats – Bin Diving

CLASSIC WOODEN BOATS – BIN DIVING

Yesterday I meet briefly with David Campbell-Morrison to receive a collection of boating books and magazines that David saved for the rubbish bin. The original owner of the collection was a Mr Thompson and most date from the early 1930’s to the mid 1940’s.
Some of the USA MotorBoating magazines are in very good condition and the covers are almost collectable art. Today cover is from the March 1935 issue.


Amongst the many items was a ‘photo’ (press clipping) album – the photo below is dated Dec 1931 and appeared in the NZ Herald. Can we ID the launch on the left of the photo?The caption reads “Stretching their sails in preparation for the official opening of the Yachting season today. Pleasure craft which made a pretty picture on the Auckland Harbour last week-end. The yachts are Matariki (N10) and Leveret (V5)