Arethusa – New Wheelhouse Project

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Arethusa – New Wheelhouse Project
 
Back in October as part of another story I mentioned that Arethusa was inline for a treat – her Bay of Islands owner, Dean Wright has decided to a build / install a new wheelhouse. Arethusa is almost 100 year old (99) so a perfect centennial present for the 33’ Bob Brown built ex gaff rigged cutter. Arethusa these days is configured in work-boat / launch style.
 
The new wheelhouse is being made from Iroko by John Gander – John is a shipwright extraordinaire, served his apprenticeship and worked for Careys for many years. 
Included above are the design drawings for the wheelhouse and an existing photo for comparison. 
We will be following this project on WW with much interest – love a good project.
 
To see / read more on Arethusa, including restoring & installing a Gardner 4LW – more links there  https://waitematawoodys.com/2017/12/31/restoring-installing-a-gardner-in-arethusa-revisited/

Boatbuilders Woody Garage Sale

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BOATBUILDERS WOODY GARAGE SALE
 
This is a once in a long-time chance – Salthouse Boatbuilders are having a clean up and the word from the ‘boss’, Delayne Salthouse, is get rid of it. So woodys this is an invite to pop down to the Salthouse Yard this Saturday (9th) between 10am and 2pm and grab a bargain. Cash only but we are talking rock-bottom clearance prices e.g. some might be in the low hundreds and others in the low low dollars, some even free to a good home for selected expired stock 😉
 
Woody David Cooke, will be firing up the BBQ – good old fashioned bangers-in-bread. 
The photos above are only to give a peek of what’s on sale, there is a lot more to be added in the next few days. As they say “one man’s trash is another mans gold” 🙂
 
ADDRESS: Salthouse Boatbuilders, 84 Rame Rd, Greenhithe, Auckland 0632
WHEN: This Saturday, 9th November (note: no prior viewing)
TIME: 10.am > 2pm
 
REMEMBER – CASH ONLY

 

Lady Ellen Restoration – October Update

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LADY ELLEN RESTORATION – OCTOBER UPDATE

With a December launch date, Lady Ellen’s owner Bruce Mitchinson is on the downhill run – putting all the expensive bits on and hooking everything up.
Bruce’s words below tell us the status / list of things to do + the two videos show us the workmanship that is being ‘applied’ to the Lady.
Looking stunning 🙂
 

“Started painting the interior last Thursday.

Bunks have been removed to provide room to spray and some of the trim is out and being finished off site.
Moving from the forecastle backwards through to the cockpit, then we will tackle the decks.
Windows all patterned and should be in production tomorrow.

Bronze castings in the system and should be ready in a couple of weeks time.

Old mast is in the process of being remodelled to take hidden conduits for lights and gps antenna, and beefed up a bit to the right scale.
Galley and cockpit timber decking still to do after painting.
Electrics and plumbing gear all sorted but final fix still to go
 
VIDEO – PART ONE
 
VIDEO – PART TWO

Jaguar – mini me

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JAGUAR – mini me
 
John Bullivant is a very talented man, one of his talents is building classic boating models – not the kit-set ones, we are talking about drafting them by eye from what ever resources are still around. John had mentioned he was keen to build one of the 40’ Jaguar, which he had wanted to build since back in the days when she was moored down the road from John’s place at Bucklands Beach in the 1960’s > 1980’s, (the photo of her on the hard at Bucklands in the 1970’s below). 
John didn’t have a plan to go off, just this photo, some movie grabs from Ken Rickets and some info from on-line sources. The model is R/C and powered with two water cooled (pump) 540 brushed motors and has independent motor control. It also has twin sound units (unfortunately they haven’t got Detroits in the program, but they make a reasonable sound – check out the youtube link below.
Has the usual lights etc, and cooling water comes out of the exhausts and side telltales. Model is glass over planked balsa with a ply deck and balsa coamings.

Youtube video of the model –https://youtu.be/VqUNmWlKdGw

 

 Previous WW story on Jaguar.  https://waitematawoodys.com/2014/08/16/looking-for-jaguar/

 
Its the 2nd Woody Classics Weekend today – 20+ boats cruising to the Stillwater Motor Camp for a picnic – lots of photos tomorrow 🙂
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UPDATE: Photos below showing John’s attention to detail – the one of the original boat under way (ex Ken Ricketts video footage, filmed in the 1970’s) and the one of the ‘as launched’ model (also ex KR) – shows matching colours on the deck and dinghy.
Plus more from KR of the launch day.

The Refurbishment Of Tamariki

The Refurbishment Of Tamariki
Todays story is a video essay on the refurbishment of Tamariki, the 45’ Gary Wheeler designed ’spirit of tradition’  ketch owned by Peter Mortimer, father of CYA Chairman James Mortimer.
The video was filmed and edited by the very talented Roger Mills, a friend of Peter’s
Post the refurbishment Peter has been cruising the Pacific and attended the 2019 Australian Wooden Boat Festival in Hobart – in fact the only Kiwi boat in attendance. Roger joined Peter for the homeward leg – Hobart > Picton.
Enjoy – it is a great insight into the 7 month project – wonderful work, well done everyone that rubbed up against Tamariki during this labour of love.
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RSVP– you and your boats name + approx. numbers to sueedwards@xtra.co.nz

Lady Ellen Restoration – July Update

LADY ELLEN RESTORATION JULY UPDATE
 
Today is a first, no photos just videos, shot and narrated by Lady Ellen’s owner Bruce Mitchinson, I have to say its a great format for getting a status report on the progress of the restoration – very impressed Bruce 🙂
I’ll let Bruce tell us what’s been happening
 
“Visit to the boatyard, in Russell, end of july, to check on progress, and start the motor – new valves, rings, injectors, sump, bell housing, number 2 piston and con rod, so we thought it would be no trouble.
after cranking the thing over in the space of a couple of hours, bleeding lines, and trying all sorts, we gave up. It fired up for 4 seconds and we shut it down as the oil pressure was not up, after that we had oil pressure cranking on the starter, but it wouldn’t kick.
Fuel pressure at the injector pump looked pretty weak on all cylinders but number 3, and we thought that we would have to send the pump off to the doctors to get it looked at.
One last go yesterday [7th august] and armed with a new battery, some optimism, and a threatening looking sledge hammer, we had success!
Woodys – I’m interested in your feed back he being able to view the videos – if you are unable, can you drop me an email (link below) I’m keen to ensure everyone can view them 🙂
waitematawoodys@gmail.com
UPDATE – OPEN THE COMMENTS SECTION IF YOU HAVE PROBLEMS VIEWING –  for some reason they will load there but not in the main body of the story.
THE ENGINE
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Another clinker joined the fleet yesterday…………… thats 4, but who’s counting (other than the wife)

 

Skipjack (Sea Devil)

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Re-glassed and back into the water

SKIPJACK (SEA DEVIL)

Woody Greg Bilington contacted me recently re his launch – Skipjack, formerly named Sea Devil, when owned by Brent Gribble.

In Greg’s words, Shipjack is a 100-year-old, unpretentious 33′ Bailey. Greg has sent in an update on the recent maintenance / restoration that he has undertaken on the woody. I’ll let Greg tell the story (with a wee bit of editing)

“I knew that Skipjack took on some water, but since the hull was sound, I wasn’t overly concerned and focused initially on mechanicals, which included replacing the prop, shaft, cutlass bearing, universal etc. In time, I decided we needed to stifle the ingress of water – and as anyone who has ever had a leaky anything will know, this can be a challenging task. Skin fittings, which were the first suspects had all been replaced and properly backed, but whilst necessary, did not made a beakerful of a difference. The stuffing box seemed a likely candidate, and though it was due for re-packing, this too, could not account for the increasing amount of work being done by the bilge pump. 

So, we hauled out at the Landing to pressure test the shaft log, and again drew a blank. It was at that point that Grant Hendry – then working at Orakei Marina, seized hold of the keel behind the rudder and discovered to my great alarm that he could move it centimetres either way! This gave rise to a nightmare or two about soft timber the length of the boat – but in any event, was almost certainly the source of the problem. 

Nevertheless, if the timber was sound and further inspection indicated that it was, then that left the keel bolts. For me this was an unexpected discovery, but I daresay it shouldn’t have been. Manganese bronze bolts subject to galvanic action for a century, and with ball-peened fastenings on the bottom of the keel, might be expected to be well past their use-by date. The problem about this of course, was that there was a Ford Dover sitting over several of them.

With an elderly woody, as we know, once started, one must persevere. So, in due course, Moon Engines removed the motor – at which time I should add, James and his team did a sterling job replacing all seals (which had begun to leak) and generally gave it a proper birthday. 

Meanwhile, boat builder Glenn Burnnand knocked out the old bolts, and confirmed that they were very much the sorrier for wear. Thinned and with numerous hair-line fractures, they were hanging on by the skin of their teeth. Don Burnnand made new bolts, each with a damned big washer and nut, and when Glenn cranked these up, the mission was accomplished. The keel locked up as tight as the day she was built – and possibly tighter. I’ve included a pic to show the difference between the two…

Burnnand Marine also removed the old glass from the deck-planking, over-laid these with marine ply, re-glassed and painted. A superb job. In my view it’s worthwhile giving a plug to those tradesmen you can rely on completely – and he is one of them. Providing you can drop your mast – since you must pass under the Tamaki Bridge (entry to the Outdoor Boating Club) – access to Shed 10 on Ngapipi Road is very easy.

Long story short, the bilge pump is having a well-earned rest, bolts are good for another century, and I sleep even more soundly on the water.”

You can read / see more on Skipjack at the WW links below

https://waitematawoodys.com/2016/08/27/skipjack/

https://waitematawoodys.com/2016/02/24/sea-devil/