Jaguar – mini me

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JAGUAR – mini me
 
John Bullivant is a very talented man, one of his talents is building classic boating models – not the kit-set ones, we are talking about drafting them by eye from what ever resources are still around. John had mentioned he was keen to build one of the 40’ Jaguar, which he had wanted to build since back in the days when she was moored down the road from John’s place at Bucklands Beach in the 1960’s > 1980’s, (the photo of her on the hard at Bucklands in the 1970’s below). 
John didn’t have a plan to go off, just this photo, some movie grabs from Ken Rickets and some info from on-line sources. The model is R/C and powered with two water cooled (pump) 540 brushed motors and has independent motor control. It also has twin sound units (unfortunately they haven’t got Detroits in the program, but they make a reasonable sound – check out the youtube link below.
Has the usual lights etc, and cooling water comes out of the exhausts and side telltales. Model is glass over planked balsa with a ply deck and balsa coamings.

Youtube video of the model –https://youtu.be/VqUNmWlKdGw

 

 Previous WW story on Jaguar.  https://waitematawoodys.com/2014/08/16/looking-for-jaguar/

 
Its the 2nd Woody Classics Weekend today – 20+ boats cruising to the Stillwater Motor Camp for a picnic – lots of photos tomorrow 🙂
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UPDATE: Photos below showing John’s attention to detail – the one of the original boat under way (ex Ken Ricketts video footage, filmed in the 1970’s) and the one of the ‘as launched’ model (also ex KR) – shows matching colours on the deck and dinghy.
Plus more from KR of the launch day.

The Refurbishment Of Tamariki

The Refurbishment Of Tamariki
Todays story is a video essay on the refurbishment of Tamariki, the 45’ Gary Wheeler designed ’spirit of tradition’  ketch owned by Peter Mortimer, father of CYA Chairman James Mortimer.
The video was filmed and edited by the very talented Roger Mills, a friend of Peter’s
Post the refurbishment Peter has been cruising the Pacific and attended the 2019 Australian Wooden Boat Festival in Hobart – in fact the only Kiwi boat in attendance. Roger joined Peter for the homeward leg – Hobart > Picton.
Enjoy – it is a great insight into the 7 month project – wonderful work, well done everyone that rubbed up against Tamariki during this labour of love.
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RSVP– you and your boats name + approx. numbers to sueedwards@xtra.co.nz

Lady Ellen Restoration – July Update

LADY ELLEN RESTORATION JULY UPDATE
 
Today is a first, no photos just videos, shot and narrated by Lady Ellen’s owner Bruce Mitchinson, I have to say its a great format for getting a status report on the progress of the restoration – very impressed Bruce 🙂
I’ll let Bruce tell us what’s been happening
 
“Visit to the boatyard, in Russell, end of july, to check on progress, and start the motor – new valves, rings, injectors, sump, bell housing, number 2 piston and con rod, so we thought it would be no trouble.
after cranking the thing over in the space of a couple of hours, bleeding lines, and trying all sorts, we gave up. It fired up for 4 seconds and we shut it down as the oil pressure was not up, after that we had oil pressure cranking on the starter, but it wouldn’t kick.
Fuel pressure at the injector pump looked pretty weak on all cylinders but number 3, and we thought that we would have to send the pump off to the doctors to get it looked at.
One last go yesterday [7th august] and armed with a new battery, some optimism, and a threatening looking sledge hammer, we had success!
Woodys – I’m interested in your feed back he being able to view the videos – if you are unable, can you drop me an email (link below) I’m keen to ensure everyone can view them 🙂
waitematawoodys@gmail.com
UPDATE – OPEN THE COMMENTS SECTION IF YOU HAVE PROBLEMS VIEWING –  for some reason they will load there but not in the main body of the story.
THE ENGINE
WCW Riverhead2019
Another clinker joined the fleet yesterday…………… thats 4, but who’s counting (other than the wife)

 

Skipjack (Sea Devil)

Motuhuie May 19(2)

Re-glassed and waiting for mast

Re-glassed and back into the water

SKIPJACK (SEA DEVIL)

Woody Greg Bilington contacted me recently re his launch – Skipjack, formerly named Sea Devil, when owned by Brent Gribble.

In Greg’s words, Shipjack is a 100-year-old, unpretentious 33′ Bailey. Greg has sent in an update on the recent maintenance / restoration that he has undertaken on the woody. I’ll let Greg tell the story (with a wee bit of editing)

“I knew that Skipjack took on some water, but since the hull was sound, I wasn’t overly concerned and focused initially on mechanicals, which included replacing the prop, shaft, cutlass bearing, universal etc. In time, I decided we needed to stifle the ingress of water – and as anyone who has ever had a leaky anything will know, this can be a challenging task. Skin fittings, which were the first suspects had all been replaced and properly backed, but whilst necessary, did not made a beakerful of a difference. The stuffing box seemed a likely candidate, and though it was due for re-packing, this too, could not account for the increasing amount of work being done by the bilge pump. 

So, we hauled out at the Landing to pressure test the shaft log, and again drew a blank. It was at that point that Grant Hendry – then working at Orakei Marina, seized hold of the keel behind the rudder and discovered to my great alarm that he could move it centimetres either way! This gave rise to a nightmare or two about soft timber the length of the boat – but in any event, was almost certainly the source of the problem. 

Nevertheless, if the timber was sound and further inspection indicated that it was, then that left the keel bolts. For me this was an unexpected discovery, but I daresay it shouldn’t have been. Manganese bronze bolts subject to galvanic action for a century, and with ball-peened fastenings on the bottom of the keel, might be expected to be well past their use-by date. The problem about this of course, was that there was a Ford Dover sitting over several of them.

With an elderly woody, as we know, once started, one must persevere. So, in due course, Moon Engines removed the motor – at which time I should add, James and his team did a sterling job replacing all seals (which had begun to leak) and generally gave it a proper birthday. 

Meanwhile, boat builder Glenn Burnnand knocked out the old bolts, and confirmed that they were very much the sorrier for wear. Thinned and with numerous hair-line fractures, they were hanging on by the skin of their teeth. Don Burnnand made new bolts, each with a damned big washer and nut, and when Glenn cranked these up, the mission was accomplished. The keel locked up as tight as the day she was built – and possibly tighter. I’ve included a pic to show the difference between the two…

Burnnand Marine also removed the old glass from the deck-planking, over-laid these with marine ply, re-glassed and painted. A superb job. In my view it’s worthwhile giving a plug to those tradesmen you can rely on completely – and he is one of them. Providing you can drop your mast – since you must pass under the Tamaki Bridge (entry to the Outdoor Boating Club) – access to Shed 10 on Ngapipi Road is very easy.

Long story short, the bilge pump is having a well-earned rest, bolts are good for another century, and I sleep even more soundly on the water.”

You can read / see more on Skipjack at the WW links below

https://waitematawoodys.com/2016/08/27/skipjack/

https://waitematawoodys.com/2016/02/24/sea-devil/

 

What Are You Doing This Winter

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BOAT CRAFTS

Today I’d like to intro boatcrafts.nz  the new initiative from the NZ Traditional Boatbuilding School – in my words its a very hands-on series of workshops where we can learn / brush-up on the basic fundamentals of maintaining, restoring or building a wooden boat. The trustees, sounds a bit posh 🙂 are just a bunch of passionate kiwi boaties that care about the future of the wooden boating movement and unlike most of us are actually doing something to help us all out.
I’ll let the NZTBBS guys tell the story, see below. Note: Links to the individual courses are at the bottom of the page. Or check out the website.
Have a read and decide what interests you the most – I’m sure the 1st – “ Marine Propulsion Systems” would appeal to all boat owners – but note – numbers are limited to 20, so get in quick. Shortly we will be running a survey asking for your help on what subjects appeal the most – more details soon.
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LINKS
MARINE PROPULSION SYSTEMS 
BUILD A 1/2 MODEL                             
ESSENTIAL SKILLS COURSE
LOFTING
WORKING WITH COMPOSITES
STEAM BEDING AND FITTING RIBS

Faith + The Milford Slipway opens

Faith

FAITH

Woody Steve Horsley on a recent trip down south snapped the above photo of Faith on Lake Te Anau.
I recall seeing previous photos but can not find her in the WW library – can anyone tell us more about her?
Input from Cameron Pollard – Faith was built in Scotland in 1935. Sailed to New Zealand in 1980 after cruising the Med. Currently has a 6L3 Gardner.
I was told by one of her old skippers the late Bill Anderson that she was originally twin screw. Bill could certainly tell a good yarn so that info cant be held as gospel.
Input from Dick Fisher

“Faith was built for an English Lord I believe his name was Shalcroft ( I can be corrected on the spelling of this).. Faith was purchased in England by a Roy Ryan who was employed by me at the time of his arrival in NZ having motor sailed all the way from the UK with all their household furniture & belongings. The crew consisted of his wife & young daughter.
Engine power at that time was from twin screw P6 Perkins Diesel engines. Faith was next purchased by Peter McDonald & berthed in Whangarei, he then commenced a major refurbishment
wherein the 2 Perkins were taken out & a rebuilt 6L3 Gardner was installed. At the same time the wheelhouse was rebuilt along with much other woodwork most of which was done by Nick Rodokal
The Gardner engine was from an ex fishing vessel purchased from Happy Yovich in Hikurangi.
The teak single skin planking is fastened with bronze bolts.
I have seen Faith hard at work on Lake Te Anau where my step-son now lives .

Hope this fills in some gaps for you.”
Dick Fisher
MV Akarana
Whangarei

New (old) Railway Haul Out Boat Yard – The Milford Slipway
I’m very happy to be able to tell you that Geoff Bagnall’s Milford yard is now back in business and operating under the watchful eye of woody Jason Prew.
Its called The Milford Slipway and if your a regular reader of WW I do not have to tell you the benefits of hauling out on a railway slip + they offer just about every service marine to would need.
So whether you just want to haul out for a quick bottom scrub and anti-foul or you need a boatbuilder, electrical, or engineer – The Milford Slip can sort you out + there is a covered workshop for vessels up to 55’ – I will do a full feature on the yard soon, but in the mean time I would suggest you give Jason a call on 027 454 2490 to book a spot, I have already slotted Raindance in 😉
If you have been hauling out city-side you will be pleasantly surprised with the yards rates 😉
Ps If you are like Mark Edmonds on Monterey and a little apprehensive of coming into the marina via the creek, the boys will meet you and pilot you in.

Lady Ellen Restoration Update – March 2019

Lady Ellen Restoration Update – March 2019

Owner Bruce Mitchinson sent in the photos above & report below:

“About half way through the interior fit out so far.
Galley joinery is complete and has been shifted back to the workshop ready for paint.
Built in electrical and navigators consoles, and the new helm station in the queue for paint too.
Down below the new cabin soles and cabin partitions are all in, apart from the partition for the head, which is made, but out of the way while the space is being made into a wet room.
Hull lining and bunk slats all prefinished, ready for fitting.
Plumbing, thru-hull fittings and holding tank all set out, in the next week or two we will have a session with the hole saws to fit all these.
New exhaust pipe fitting will go in at the same time.
We have the engine in bits and all the parts have been stripped back and primed. 
Final coat of paint goes on this week so it can be reassembled and tested before it goes back in.
Electrical and fresh water plumbing coming up soon”
To see/ read more on this restoration project – enter Lady Ellen in the WW search box.
Photos below to show you how far Bruce has come with the LE project – very impressive.