Out With The Old – In With The New

Out With The Old In With The New

Nathan Herbert’s 1917 Joe Slattery built launch – Pacific, had a serious Jenny Craig session yesterday at Milford – out came the 2758 Ib. Lister (Freedom range) diesel engine, to be replaced with a brand new 992 Ib. 100hp FPT / Iveco (Italian) 4 cylinder diesel. That is a saving of over 800kg, thats like asking the All Black forward pack to get off your boat. I suspect the waterline will need an adjustment 🙂 

As always Jason Prew and The Slipway gang were on hand to help, with expertise and the loan of their Hiab truck to collect the new engine. We look forward to seeing the completed installation and relaid wheelhouse. I suspect we will not see Pacific at the Woody Stillwater picnic next Saturday (26th).

Around The Yards – The Slipway Milford

L>R Marline, Connie V
Disturber
L>R Lucinda, Disturber

Around The Yards – The Slipway Milford


I was passing thru Milford last week, so took the opportunity to drop in on the team at The Slipway (Geoff Bagnall’s yard in a previous life).I can report that I was pleasantly pleased to see so many woodys hauled out and in various stages of repair – from the annual bum clean right thru to major refits.The one that caught my eye the most was the 35’ Leone Warne built launch – Marline, more on her on Monday, I now have so many cool photos from her past.
The woodys below are at the yard, where possible I have included a WW link to see / read more on each one.


The Slipway yard is one of Auckland’s very few ‘railway’ hail out facilities and both deserves and needs the support of the wooden boating community. If we lose yards like this we will be forced to use yards that tend to have equipment designed for big while plastic boats and that are not wooden boat friendly in terms of planked boats. So woodys support the guys that support us. Contact Jason Prew for details on haul out rates and on-site services. jason@slipway.co.nz

Connie V – https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/12/23/connie-v-saved/
Lucinda – https://waitematawoodys.com/2018/09/30/lucinda-4sale/
Disturber – https://waitematawoodys.com/2013/04/19/disturber/
Marline – https://waitematawoodys.com/2013/04/16/marline/
Lonestar – a visitor from Hawkes Bay 😉 more on this project later.
Gweneviere – another visitor from Hawkes Bay and possibly a project.

Arethusa’s New Woody Wheelhouse

ARETHUSA’s NEW WOODY WHEELHOUSE


Back in late 2019 Arethusa’s Bay of Islands owner Dean Wright, a professional photographer by trade, and well known to WW readers gave me the heads up that the 1917, 33’ Bob Brown built, ex gaff rigged cutter, was in for a treat – a new wheelhouse. Since then I have been pestering Dean on a regular basis for photos, even threatened to drive up and take them myself 🙂 Problem was, the mans a perfectionist and didn’t want to send anything in to WW until it was all shipshape. Well woodys as you can see from the above, its very shipshape, in fact in my eyes – perfect. Well done to the team. I asked Dean to tell use about the project, so I’ll hand over to him. Remember you can enlarge the photos by clicking on them – Enjoy 🙂


“Over the years we’ve got keen on changing Arethusa’s wheelhouse to be more in keeping with her age, so at 102 she’s undergone some cosmetic surgery 🙂

We lost 8″ inches of headroom in wheelhouse when we installed the Gardner, so we’ve gone up in height 6 inches and forward 8 inches and gone for more traditional upright windows fw’d.

Boat builder John Gander did the job in his Waipiro Bay workshop. He started by taking patterns off the existing wheelhouse and fw’d cabin top. He replicated the curve of the fw’d cabin top in ply and built the new wheelhouse around that in six sections. He also laminated the new wheelhouse roof, allowing for a good eyebrow fw’d and a smaller one aft.

John learned his trade at Roger Carey’s yard in Picton in the 60’s and 70’s, where beautiful work boats with great looking wheelhouses were the order of the day. John built one of my favorite Carey designs, Hinewai for his own boat and we’ve replicated her fw’d opening half window on Arethusa. 

Once the wheelhouse was complete, we hauled Arethusa at Ashby’s in Opua and got to work with the skill-saw. In no time we’d reduced her to a convertible. We were lucky for Northland’s drought everything stayed reasonably dry and also that we got everything closed in and back in the water before Covid shut the yard down.

I’m in awe of how boat builders can build something like this away from the boat, then fit the pieces with a minimum of shaping. Fitting and gluing the six sections to the existing house went really smoothly.

The wheelhouse is built from 2″ Iroko. This is the first outside varnish we’ve had on Arethusa, we hand brushed 2 coats of Cetol as a base and six coats of Schooner Yacht Varnish.

Over lock-down, the apprentice made new interior joinery, gone are the Warehouse plastic drawers and chipboard frame 🙂 Moved the batteries under the new bench unit so we can now stand at the wheel. John laminated me up some lovely curved trim for the front of the oven unit. Our old manky plywood dash got an upgrade to kauri and the old wheel got a fright with a good scrub and a varnish.

Outside we made nav light boxes and dorade boxes.  We had to move the aluminium framed front hatch fw’d, a more traditional looking one in Iroko is on the to-do list. The liferings also got a birthday.

Here’s some before and after pics and also some that I hope will give some idea of the process. Thanks John for all your incredibly skilled design and build work, we’re really stoked with it.

We’re always keen to learn more of Arethusa’s history, especially the 1955-2000 period in the South Island. If you have any stories we’d love to hear them.”

Links to previous WW stories on Arethusa
https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/12/11/arethusa-new-wheelhouse-project/
https://waitematawoodys.com/2017/12/31/restoring-installing-a-gardner-in-arethusa-revisited/
https://waitematawoodys.com/2013/11/01/arethusa-winsome/

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Nautilus

NAUTILUS


Today’s woody story features the launch Nautilus, and the above photo of her on the Avon- Heath Estuary and details come to us via Lew Redwood.  She was built in Auckland c.1912 for Frederick  Horace  Edwin Chester. It is alleged the boat was involved in war work  during WW1 and then sold to a Harry Nelson Hawker who established a passenger service from the Seaview Road Bridge to Pleasant Point, Canterbury, which lasted 10 years.

There is a large void in her history from the late 1920’s until she was acquired by Allan Williams in 1994 and under went a rolling restoration over 17 years before being donated to Auckland’s maritime museum in 2011, where she now earns her keep doing inner harbour tourist cruises, photo below. 

RSVP waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Read more here https://waitematawoodys.com/2016/08/11/nautilus-2/

Electra

ELECTRA280

ELECTRA281

ELECTRA
 
I was contacted yesterday by David Grogan whose grandfather, Ted (Edward Alfred) Grogan, who’s family lived in Ngunguru up near Whangarei, in 1919 Ted owned the motor launch, Electra in partnership with a Mr. P Wellington.
 
David had uncovered a Northern Advocate report about the arrival in Ngunguru of the vessel, in October 1919, She was described as having, “just arrived from Auckland…about 28 feet overall with a good beam and mast and sails. She is fitted throughout with every modern convenience”. From this brief description David commented that Electra does not sound like she was a working boat. She may have been converted into a pleasure craft, at that point however. David had done a WW search and found a suggestion from Harold Kidd that Electra may have been designed by C. Harrison Smith and built by Bailey & Tyre, at Hall’s Beach, Northcote.
Ted Grogan married in 1922 and its likely he sold his share in Electra, to help finance the family home back in Auckland.
 
I contacted Harold Kidd and he was able to confirm that Electra was designed by C. Harrison Smith and built by Bailey & Tyer at Hall’s Beach Northcote in December 1912 for G. Thorne George and D.M. Davis of Parnell. She was 30’ x 8’ and had a 10hp Djinn kerosene engine. Harold also supplied the above photos.
She was sold after a couple of years to a Mr Hogan who sold her to Whangarei ‘for fishing purposes’ in 1919, so it would appear that David’s grandfather took her north for fishing.
She disappears from the record in 1922, probably with a name change.
 
Is anyone able to enlighten us on what became of Electra post 1922? Harold commented that she looked almost square bilged, but she wasn’t. Hopefully her distinctive lines may have made her memorable.
 

Southern Woodys – Work Boat Wednesday

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Southern Woodys – Work Boat Wednesday
 

Iain Forsyth, owner of the 1961, 42’6″’, Miller & Tunnage built ex work boat – Meola, has recently returned from a trip to the other island. Ian commented that he stopped off at Carey’s Bay and saw Pakeha (recently featured on WW) on the slips after a large refit by Carey’s Marine and ready to launch.


Iain snapped the above gallery of workboats. It was opportune timing as the Bluff fleet were in port and getting ready for the season. Now I’m sure they aren’t all woodys but as per the NZ Classic Yacht Association rules (see below) metal is all good 🙂 
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Restoration of classic 1912 launch – Lion

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Restoration of MV LION 

Lion was launched in late 1912 for use on Lake Wakaptipu for Hugh McKenzie of Lake Wakatipu, serving the family and owners of Walter Peak, Fernhill and Mt Nicholas Stations. When launched she was fitted with a 21hp, 3 cylinder Clifton engine.
Constructed from kauri planking to a canoe stern design, to handle the choppy and unpredictable conditions of Lake Wakatipu. Her specs are – Length: 38′,
Beam: 9′, Draft: 3′ & she is powered by a Yanmar 51hp. (Info ex Harold Kidd)
At one stage she operated as a charter vessel on Lake Wakatipu.

Lion has made a previous appearance on WW and can be viewed at the link below
The facebook link below shows Lion arriving at the boat yard prior to commencement of work.

In 2019 Lion changed hands and her new owners commissioned an extensive restoration / refit at the Graham Caird’s ‘Repair My Boat’ yard (formerly Southern Classic Boats) in Invercargill, South Island. All timber used in the project is either kauri or Burmese teak.
I understand that her new owners will be returning her to Queenstown and her new home will be the Frankton marina.
The gallery of photos above showcases the amazing work that some of New Zealand’s most talented shipwrights are doing – living in Auckland sometimes we get a tad myopic 🙂
Photos below – pre-restoration

Classic Yacht Porn – Mariquita

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CLASSIC YACHT PORN – MARIQUITA

In February the worldwide owners of classic wooden yachts held their breath as one of the worlds most stunning classics – the 125’, 1911 W. Fife III designed and built – Mariquita, went to a no-reserve auction in Paris. This auction would probably set the bench mark for future sails. 
On the day Mariquita sold for £357,000 – that just over NZD$700k, a bargain and I bet you could hear a pin drop in the members bar at the – New York YC, Yacht Club de Monaco, Royal Yacht Club and the Royal Thames Yacht Club. Not that long ago the asking price was £2,750,000.
I came across the YouTube video below – ‘Sailing Aboard Mariquita’ on the Classic Sail fb page. It is a tad sales promo but a great video, they had British sailing legend, Harold Ludmore, onboard calling the shots. Its well worth 12’ of your time to watch. Below also is a transcript.

TRANSCRIPT

Take a look at this boat… she’s one of the most beautiful boats ever built…

She’s Mariquita launched in 1911 and she’s a piece of maritime history – an antique – but very much afloat and being raced like she was new.

I once joined her for a week in Italy sailing aboard as regatta crew, and it’s one of the best experiences I’ve  ever had.

She’s sailed as she would have been in 1911 – no winches , everything is done with pulleys on the deck and she’s gaff rig so there’s lots of cordage.

She has 18 crew – six are permanent, six sign on for a season and then they take on six for each regatta.

She was restored to be sailed at these big classic regattas – especially in the Mediterranean.

She’s a big class yacht – with a length on deck or overall being 95ft – taken out to 125ft over her bowsprit and boom. She draws 12ft… so she’s no creek crawler!

She was rebuilt and relaunched in 2004, by Fairlie restorations, now sadly no more. The craftsmanship of her restoration was superlative, I saw her at the time and every feature about her was excellent. They’d recreated a dream-boat from another time and now instead of being in black and white here was the honey colour of her varnished hatches, the polished brass of her fittings and the lovely warm grey of her teak decks – which feel so good under bare feet.

She’s composite construction so she has a steel rib cage – or frame, over which wooden planks are fastened, and this was how she was built originally. It makes her very strong and she has been and she can… be raced hard.

Her first owner was Arthur Stothert, who was 49 when he had her built in 1911. Her designer was William Fife. She’s built to the 19 M rule – only four boats were built – all in 1911 and Fife built two of them, the other two were by Nicholson and Mylne…

They raced briefly before the first world war and then Mariquita was sold to Norway… she raced again in Britain between the wars – but there was no 19-M class by then, and then she ended up dismasted and de-rigged in a mud berth in WW2 first at the Deben and later on the Orwell at Pin Mill. There she lay as a houseboat, and that was where she was discovered in 1987 by William Collier who was scouting out such classics for the famous Ferrari collector Albert Obrist.

Obrist, who had sold most of his cars, had moved on to boats and had restored and just relaunched the 107ft (33m) 1931 Fife schooner Altair – often cited as the restoration that set the standards for all to follow.

In 1991 Obrist set up Fairlie Restorations, the high quality classic yacht specialist on the Hamble. Mariquita was acquired awaiting an owner and Ernst Klaus and Peter Livanos came to her rescue having a superb restoration completed at Fairlies between 2001 and 2004.

They kept and race Mariquita until her centenerary year – with Jim Thom as her captain… and then ten years later… with her new owners and skipper I got a chance to sail aboard.

This was at Porto Santo Stefano for the Argentario sailing week every June since 1998 in lovely Southern Tuscany.

I was to be one of the six regatta crew they take on for a week… First things first – you get assigned your personal water bottle – no single use plastic here… I met some old friends – Cornelius and Dickie.

The pros are up early, Billy the bosun coils ropes along with Robyn and Pippa, who are sailors as well as chief stewardess and cook

I meet George the captain, who was Jim Thom’s mate – talking to Matty the mate and then the helmsman – also the owner – Johnny Caulcutt came aboard…

Soon it was time to meet a sailing legend – Harold Cudmore who is our tactician for the week. The days start with warm up exercises which include a few stretches and we all get a bit hands on as well – this is a good idea and gets you ready for when you are going to do some pulley hauling… And it’s time to raise the sails.

Cudmore’s already counting down to the start and I’m up here on the foredeck, with Richard Sawle and the bowman Jérôme Collet – Jerome’s a relaxed kind of cat – until he needs to leap into the rigging. Matty the mate and Millie are also on the foredeck, and from my position at the end of the mainsheet I can see right back down the deck.

The sheet is called by Peter or Tubsy Brook. I help in hanking on the jib topsail… It’s good to be out on the bowsprit when you’re office bound… of course in my head I still think I’m the schoonerman of my youth!

Fully rigged she looks fully dressed – with a lot of sail area high up to catch the wind; note the jib topsl which is flaked and tied up in wool ready to be broken out by tugging it sheet when needed…

With an upwind sail area of more than 6,000 sq feet she’s capable of kicking up some sea dust – even in these light airs.

If people in Santo Stefano look out of their window they get a nice view today – we’re here with some other big boats –Shamrock and Cambria

Shamrock V was the first J Class to be built – in 1930 – for Thomas Lipton’s fifth attempt to win back the America’s Cup for Britain. She’s uncompetitive in the modern J Class but she just leaves us in her wake… she’s built of wood on steel frames as well.

Eleonora the replica Herreshoff schooner is the biggest vessel here…

Between tacks the crew lies on the weather deck, with Milly, forward, calling the trim on the jib with hand signals.

The folk of another Fife – Halloween, from 1926 and a Bermudan design are slowly overtaking us… The next boat to overtake us is Cambria and she takes about four minutes to haul ahead – hand over hand she’s the faster boat and although our gaff handicap will help she’s the one to beat – she won in our class the year before.

And has Cudmore got a plan? I like his look of concentration – and it turns out, the next day he does…  But we’re sailing well and the pros have taken us newbies in hand – hauling on ropes can be hard work – but my hands aren’t sore…

A few hours later we get to the end of the race and realise Cambria has missed a mark – she’s stopped and her sails are coming down. They get radioed and put them back up to carry on racing. Later Cudmore notes that it gave us 23 minutes on them, we have won… Day One. We have a beer with our debrief and there are tacit congratulations… Cudmore mentions the light airs are suiting us with Shamrock V as well – plus they left their big genoa behind.

Saturday’s a magic day – not just to be sailing in these waters, but we’re going to see a master tactician at work

The race is about 26 miles in a flat diamond course north of Porto Santo Stefano out into deeper water and then round a second mark in the bay of Talamoné  – the third mark is an inshore-ish mark

The wind forecast had the wind backing SW to SE – mainly light airs – which would suit us.

The race starts well and shortly after midday we’ve rounded the second mark – Cambria is ahead of us, and we can see her slowed right down with yachts around her pointing in different directions –

Away off to port on the shoreside the NY40 Chinook is hugging the shoreline and she has wind… Cudmore alters us to steer between Chinook and Cambria. And unbelievably there is enough air to carry us past them. We are literally 200 yards to Cambria‘s port… we hit the convergence ourselves about a couple of minutes later and Cudmore has everyone lying on deck with the sails sheeted amidships… we don’t dare breathe as we feel the 36 tons of lead carrying us forward with sheer silent momentum through the pellucid green waters below.

It was extraordinary thing to call  and even better to witness, especially sailing that close to the convergence zone which was caused by the meeting of an offshore and offshore breeze…

Later Harold told me: “There were two breezes today and we had three occasions – crossing back and forwards between them – to benefit from that. Picking where and how to do that was the race decider.

Cambria was clearly ahead of us but when she lost her wind we saw a smaller boat over on the shore side (Chinook) which had wind, so we could steer between the two and just keep our wind (and stay out of the convergence). Today was a day you would call a heads-out-of-the-boat day. We were all looking at what was happening around us – but there was also a lot of luck involved.

“I think it’s great that we are beginning to race these boats as they were raced 100 years ago and we have more and more respect for our forebears who raced them then. We have better materials now – better rope and so on – but otherwise the conditions are similar.”

It gave us another decisive win and Harold was rightly congratulated; when he comes into the Marco Polo restaurant later that evening he gets a round of applause.

After that a win the next day seems assured. We are on a high. Captain George says this is the first time since she was launched that Mariquita won three races in a row… It’s an auspicious season start – that year she wins the Panerai Trophy in the Big Class overall…

It was a shame to hear she was laid up in Lymington – under covers in 2015 and has been ever since – but there are a few of us who can’t afford to run boats at the moment… She remains a boat of dreams, a vessel that others flock to see. And I treasure that week, the fantastic sailing… and seeing Mr Cudmore’s genius at work.

Mariquita 1911, Designed by Wm Fife III

LOS 125ft (38m)
LOA 95ft 6in (29m)
LWL 66ft (19m)
beam  17ft 4in (5.3m)
Draught  12ft (3.7m)
Sail area Upwind  6,171 sqft (573m2)

Help Needed Finding Doris / Miss Doris

Doris : Miss Doris

Help Needed Finding Doris / Miss Doris

Greg Philpott has asked for help in tracking down the 1910, A.T. Lane (Auckland) built launch – Doris / Miss Doris. She was launched as Doris but renamed Miss Doris in 1949. Her first owner was Albert Fuller for use in the Bay of Islands.

She was a hard working launch and undertook all manner of work for AE Fullers and Sons but she was eventually sold out of the Fullers fleet in 1969 to Doug Nankervis for use as a fishing boat. She was subsequently sold in 1974 to Ashley Synnott and relocated to Mangawhai. That is where the trail goes cold, and Greg would love to find out what happened to her and where she ended up.

We do know some history of her propulsion :- No intel on what engine was in her when launch but in 1917 it was replaced with a Scripps – then in 1920 a Regal G E Coy – then in 1929 a Studebaker, 1933 saw a Alisa Craig went in – 1954 in went a Ford and lastly some time in the 1960’s a Caterpillar was shoe honed in – rumour has it, it nearly took up 1/2 the cabin 🙂

She has appeared on WW before https://waitematawoodys.com/2014/10/15/9233/

A WOODY QUIZ – Win A WW Bucket Hat

Guess the most searched word on the waitematawoodys site (after waitemata woodys) and you go into the draw to win a WW bucket hat. (model not included). Entries close off at 8pm 29-07-2020. ENTER ONLY VIA EMAIL to waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Valeeka

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VALEEKA
Recently Valeeka popped up on fb chat and then today I get a note from Wade Nisbet those grandparents owned the launch and sold her in 1953.
The photo above shows her when owned by Wade’s family, beached in the Bay of Islands after a fresh coat of anti-fouling.
Wade would love to get confirmation of what (little) he knows about the boat and also learn if she has survived and if so where she is today.
Its rumored that – she is 36’, built in 1912, builder was Bailey & Lowe. Richard Petricevich has commented that she was owned by Nicky Williams from 1953 to the 1980’s. Used as a fishing vessel in Hokianga, plus to ‘power’ the Rawene car ferry. According to Richard she also pulled the last raft of kauri logs, floated to the mill on the Hokianga. At the time of purchase she was powered by a straight 8 Scripts marine’ised petrol engine, but was later re-powered with a 4 cyl. Fordson diesel. 
Valeeka was sold to a Graeme Lidgard of Whangarei, in the 1980’s. Can someone that knows Graeme ‘point’ this WW story in his direction so we can hopefully fill in some gaps. Graeme may have sold the launch to a doctor in Thames.
 
Richard Petricevich also posted the photo below of Valeeka’s name board and bow crest – which is a little disconcerting i.e hopefully souvenired  during a re-fit and not from a wreck……….
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Harold Kidd Input – VALEKA (original spelling; named after a current racehorse of that name) was a 33 footer built by BAILEY & TYER (not Bailey & Lowe) at Hall’s Beach Northcote in December 1912 for E. Porter of Northcote. She was probably designed by C. Harrison Smith who did the design work for Bailey & Tyer at the time. Her first engine was a 12hp Hercules which was replaced by a 50hp Kermath when Noel Campbell owned her in 1923.
Log Of The Rawhiti – OOPS FIXED
If you couldn’t open the link to read/view Sunday’s story on Rawhiti’s amazing passage from Sydney to Auckland – it now ‘live again’ – click below