Peggy Bawn

PEGGY BAWN – 1894 G.L. Watson Cutter

Today thanks to the UK site ‘My Classic Boat and Bob Aylott we get to have a peek at one of the best classic yachts ever – Peggy Dawn, her owner Hal Sisk shows us around his beautiful 1894 G.L. Watson 36ft Cutter. Filmed in Cowes and The Solent on a day with not a lot of wind.

Hal Sisk also gives us a great insight into the genius of designer G.L.Watson.

If the above video has wet your whistle for more on the water time – check out below these links form the WoodenBoat Forum 

Link below to very cool vicarious cruising experience http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?279187-Cruise-of-the-Ketch-Julia
If you have more time – read the back story about the boat and the fit out – get tips and photos http://forum.woodenboat.com/showthread.php?279187-Cruise-of-the-Ketch-Julia

Anyone know Adam Leyden? If so, ask him to contact us at waitematawoodys@gmail.com

The Restoration of Rogue

The Restoration of Rogue

Scrolling thru the USA WoodenBoat Forum yesterday my woody antenna popped up when I saw a new thread on the New Zealand yacht Rogue – the 1892 gaff rigged 32’ cutter built by Chas Bailey Jnr. , it was in fact his first design.

The restoration of Rogue has been a happening thing since late 2007 and a lot of the time under the radar, not helped by her residing in Wellington.In the 2015 > 2018 period there were some unexpected ’speed bumps’ that derailed the project, and her owner relocated north to Auckland. So in early 2021 after a 120 year absence Rogue followed her owner and returned to Auckland and slipped into Wayne Olsen’s shed at the Horizon Boatyard. There the restoration has moved along at a good clip, and CV-19 aside, we can expect a splash date in early November.

I would be surprised if there was a better documented history on a classic vessel in New Zealand, and the restoration project is jaw dropping – an amazing commitment to one of New Zealand’s magnificent maritime artefacts.
Below are links to the most recent project monthly updates , but given that most of us are in lock-down, I would encourage you to click on this link https://rogue1892.com/rogues-restoration/ and scroll (its a long way) to the bottom and follow the project from day one.

Enjoy 🙂


FEBRUARY 2021 https://rogue1892.com/2021/02/

MARCH 2021 https://rogue1892.com/2021/03/

APRIL 2021 https://rogue1892.com/2021/04/

MAY 2021 https://rogue1892.com/2021/05/

JUNE 2021 https://rogue1892.com/2021/06/

JULY 2021 https://rogue1892.com/2021/07/

AUGUST 2021  https://rogue1892.com/2021/08/

Thames Traditional Boat Festival – 2021

Thames Traditional Boat Festival – 2021

The Thames Traditional Boat Festival is one of the woody events on my bucket list and today thanks to Olaf Wiig we get to vicariously check out last weekends event. 

Olaf commented that as long as it is made of wood or riveted steel it is welcome at the festival. No 1950 cut off here 🙂

Olaf’s highlight was – Islanda, see spec sheet on her below.
Enjoy the varnish 🙂

Tern II

TERN II

Several weeks ago we run a story on WW about the fate of the Stow & Son – UK yacht – Imatra, that is dining a slow death up the Tamaki River in Auckland. At the time xxx pointed out that there was another Stow & Son yacht (built in 1899) – the 52’,  gaff, yawl – Tern II in New Zealand. She is for sale on the UK yacht brokers website – Sandeman Yacht Company – I have taken the  of reproducing the background story on how she ended up in NZ.This link will take you to their site to see over 40 photos and read more about her   http://www.sandemanyachtcompany.co.uk/yacht/467/stow-and-sons-39-ft-gaff-yawl-1899-project-completion Thanks to Mark Erskine for the heads up on this hidden gem.

Tern II was launched as White Kitten in 1899, from the yard of Stow and Son, in Shoreham, UK. In early 1910 she was purchased by Claude Worth, who owned her for a couple of years and made several changes to her; documented in his book “Yacht Cruising.” Meanwhile all the ironwork he had made at this time is still with the vessel. 

After numerous owners over the next few decades, she came into the hands of Ben Pester, a New Zealand naval officer who had finished a period of service in the U.K. and was keen to return to NZ under sail. This passage, in 1951-52, was written about in his book “Just Sea and Sky”, published in 2010.  

Tern II changed hands again a few times, until she was found abandoned and a somewhat worse for wear in a mud berth near Thames North Island NZ, by Bill Cunningham. Going aboard with a mate unsure if she was worth saving; after downing the bottle of whisky found below it was decided she was indeed worthy – and thus began a 9 year period that she spent hauled out in his back yard in Cambridge not far away, replacing the deck with the addition of a cabin and all her spars, and a new interior. Her counter had been removed sometime before this and the rig changed to a cutter. She was re launched in April 1981.

Bill parted with her in 1991 and she was owned for a time by Mick Reynolds, and then Lyn Avatar, who had planned to sail her to Hawaii but cut the journey short after a 24 day passage to Tonga from the Bay of Islands. She then lay on a mooring there until the current owners came across her on their way to New Zealand. For a sum including coverage of outstanding mooring fees, a bottle of rum, and a kiss, they secured ownership and arranged shipping back to New Zealand. She is currently being stored undercover in a yard in Whangarei, Northland and undergoing restoration.