Lock-down Treat ~ Free Access To The Worldwide Classic Boat Show

A LOCK-DOWN TREAT – FREE ACCESS TO THE WORLDWIDE CLASSIC BOAT SHOW


Our friends over at Off Center Harbor have been orchestrating a new gig on the classic boat scene – a virtual worldwide classic boat show. Its been live now for 10 days and only available via purchasing a ticket (US$5) – now woodys to help us kiwis (and the WW overseas followers) during CV-19 lock-down – the show is now free.

See below instructions on how to visit the show. 

You can use the globe / map to see an amazing collection of vessel around the world + locations of museums & trade folks – but the real gem for me is the daily video presentations from some of the worlds leading lights on the classic boating scene – sailors, teachers, photographers, event promoters and boat builders. You will be addicted so I apologise in advance for ruining your day/s – but, you’re supposed to be in lock-down 🙂

If you only watch one presentation – make it the legendary Tom Cunliffe presentation – you’ll find it on Sat Feb20th under the heading ’Seas of Northern Europe’ – do not be put off by the boring title – its a cracker, the mans one of the best storytellers around, you’ll be glued to the screen for 2 hours. ENJOY THE SHOW 🙂

How To Get Your Free Ticket:

1. CLICK HERE to get your free ticket (here is the full link if you need it: https://classicboatshow.com/product/one-free-ticket-for-full-access-to-the-worldwide-classic-boat-show/ )

2. Checkout for free, and your username and password become your ticket

3. To login, go to ClassicBoatShow.com, click login in the top right corner to get full access, and enjoy the show!

If you have trouble getting your free ticket, you can always email the show’s crew for help at crew@classicboatshow.com.

If the show turns out to be an enjoyable and valuable experience for you, they have a voluntary “tips/donations” button on the top of the screen where you can contribute.

Hinera

HINERA
Alan Sexton contacted me the other day concerning Hinera, the Roy Steadman designed / Shipbuilders built 38’ launch. Alan believe that she may have been the last boat built by Shipbuilders. She appeared on the cover of ‘Boating World’ October 1971 edition – copy of article below.

Alan has commented that you can see her obvious lineage from Fiesta, Romany II et al. And maybe built to a budget as the rubber mouldings securing the windows, more appropriate for caravans and fizz boats, did not exactly enhance her.

As launched power was from twin T6 – 354 Perkins that gave her a top speed of approx. 20.5 knots and cruised at 17.9 knots. Alan recalls she was berthed on I pier at Half Moon Bay when first launched, all launches moored bow-in in those days, and her heavy stem and huge flare looked very imposing to an 11 yr old.

Hinera went off Alan’s radar round the 1970’s, do we know what became of the launch?

Manu Moana

MANA MOANA


Built in 1975 at the Salthouse yard using 3 skin kauri. Powered by twin 425hp Detroit diesels, giving a max speed of 16knots and cruise of 10 knots. Mana Moana  at 59’ in length, has a 18’ beam and draws 4’9″ but what sets her apart from most other woodys of the that length is the volume – she is huge – as an example – 3 cabins, 3 heads and 4 showers.

Originally built for the German Consul and then skippered and bought by John Pulham from Tauranga. Ken Winter was the next owners from 1982 > 1992. 
(Tech & ownership details supplied by Allan Winter via K Ricketts) 

AUCTION OF VINTAGE NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS

Chris McMullen gave me a heads up on a very special auction of vintage nautical instruments taking place tomorrow at the Cordys auction house.The items are from The Harvey Sheppard collection, a close friend of Chris’s – Link below to website / catalogue. https://www.cordys.co.nz/auctions/D002/catalogue

Whats So Special About Wooden Boats

https://vimeo.com/510393350/c94b7f0bfa?fbclid=IwAR0t66rtvtC1dcsHl2zFnsmmCEQpyW0XcLdeafmw33GjFLJksY1U5Zg_Jb0

Whats So Special About Wooden Boats
The above video by Tom Nitsch, featuring Tom’s stunning camera skills, gives a very cool insight into why in this modern age so many people are committing so much time and money restoring and enjoying wooden boats. 
The interviews with Donn Costanzo from the Wooden Boatworks yard and John Lammerts van Bueren (sailor, boat builder, author) really capture the why – something a lot of us struggle to communicate when asked by people outside the wooden boating movement.I have reproduced some of John’s comments below –

 “Most of all I think that a lot of the people who sail classic boats and enjoy the classic boats are probably more bonded than the people who sail modern boats. Nothing bad against the modern boats but modern boats are usually fiercely competitive and there is not as much love for the boat for what it is, the love is for the performance, the speed you get out of it and your chance to win the boat race. Something that people have in common is they have a drive to create and re-create and preserve and not to consume and I think that that is something very essential. If you are driven by consuming you aren’t able to create and re-create and preserve as much as you need to do to love these classic boats, and in a way the beauty of the boats that you are working with. You look at the old boats and in many ways they are compared to modern boats not as mush as a statement of your personal wealth, they are statement of beauty and it doesn’t really matter whether is a Dragon with varnished topsides or whether its a cruiser or a meter or a great big schooner, no matter how large these great big schooners are they are a statement of beauty and not a statement of wealth, all though they are incredibly expensive, it doesn’t really matter – they are beautiful and people appreciate it.”

You can see more of Tom’s work here http://www.tomnitsch.com