Zephyr

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Zephyr01

ZEPHYR
Last month I was contacted by Rowan Lane who had seen the painting of the launch Zephyr I posted on WW, refer photo below. 
Rowan is a blue blooded woody eg his surname – Lane, links him to the clan whose craft frequently appear on WW
pages. I have posted the note Rowan sent me below
“The June posting of the painting of “Zephyr” on the Whangaroa Harbour
prompted a rummage through the family albums. My father Major Lane (family
name not title) rescued Zephyr from the foreshore of the Whangaroa Harbour.
Dad was nephew to Richard Ernest (Ernie) Lane who had relocated from
Whangaroa to Picton.
Zephyr was in a sorry state inviting each incoming tide inside for a chat through its cracks and opened seams. My father set about repairing the hull re-ribbed and re fastened throughout and installed a Gray Marine petrol engine. This was in the 1930’s. 
Zephyr was seconded to the NZ Army during the war years and was used to deliver supplies to the Army post at what is now Kingfish Lodge at the entrance to the Whangaroa Harbour.
In the top photo above we see Zephyr moored at Kingfish Point. Zephyr’s dodger was modified after the war when Zephyr became a commercial fishing vessel RL 36.
My father sold Zephyr around 1950 to Joe Mueller who had emigrated to NZ from South Africa. Joe used the ‘anglicised’ spelling Millar I believe to ally any fears that he may have been of German descent. Joe continued commercial fishing for a while before changing Zephyr to a game fish charter launch.”

 

Zephyr

Zephyr

Zephyr

ZEPHYR
 
The rather good painting above of Zephyr comes to us via Wally Herbert’s fb, and Wally commented that it showed his father Albert and Joe Miller on Zephyr at the Whangaroa Harbor entrance.
There has been a lot of previous chat on WW regarding another launch named Zephyr (link below) , keen to ID this one and learn her provenance.
On the fb post a Peter Rooke commented that helots saw her in Tauranga.
 

https://waitematawoodys.com/2019/03/20/could-this-be-zephyr/

A Floating Block of Flats
WW readers will know that I occasionally poke fun at boats that have been ‘altered’ or had cabin additions and end up resembling a block of flats. Well today woodys we see the reverse – a block of flats that float.
The below appeared at Bayswater marina last year and is someones home, each to their own but if I owned a marina alongside it, I wouldn’t be impressed………
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WCW Riverhead June2020
RSVP waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Des Townson  – A Sailing Legacy

 

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Des Townson  – A Sailing Legacy

Back in July Brian Peet contacted me about his latest book publishing project, Des Townson – A Sailing Legacy. Brian asked if I would like to attend the launch night, a smallish gathering in the dinghy locker at the Royal New Zealand Yacht Squadron – of course I said yes and a few days later an advance copy of the book arrived via courier. Well that buggered my plans for that day 🙂
I later asked Brian if I could sneak a couple more onto the invite list, which happened. Then Brian lets me know that things have snow balled and the launch was now in the main ballroom at the RNZYS, things had stepped up a few notches.
Fast forward to last night and the who’s who of yachting is crammed into the Squadron. My guess would be 400+ people. Speakers were the Squadron Commodore Ian Cook, Des’s younger brother – Bill Townson and Brian Peet. Ian built six Zephyrs under Des Townson’s supervision, won the National Champs in 1980. Bill Townson is a skilled boatbuilder, yacht designer and amphibian aircraft designer/builder.
I sneaked in early any took a few photos and videos of some of the exhibits, which included a Starling, Zephyr, Mistral and a 1956 replica of Des Townson’s first commercial design Nimble. What most caught my eye, was the Townson 2.4m dinghy on display that had just been built by Allan Hooper at the NZ Traditional Boatbuilding School. Its for his own use, but if you ask me it should be should be on display somewhere. Talking to Allan I understand the school will have ‘build your own’ kits and how to classes – perfect opportunity to own a Townson.
I later filmed Brian’s talk / presentation, see below – it is a wonderful insight into how the book came about and challenges Brian had over the 10 years it took to complete it.
 
As I have said before – its a great read, buy it, you won’t be sorry – as Brian said last night – it is a “sailing book, about a sailor, written by a sailor”.
 
Enjoy the video, then buy the book – either via the website https://destownson.co.nz  or if you prefer to do a bank transfer, email Brian with your name and postal address and he will reply with bank account details – its that easy  brian@destownson.co.nz 
 
Oops nearly forgot –  Details on how to win a copy of the book on WW, later in the week.

 

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Westport Work Boat Wednesday

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Westport Work Boat Wednesday

Todays photos come to us from Andrew Hewitt and were taken in December 2018.
A nice collection, including a few laid up old woodys whose fishing days look over.
Any of the woodys owned, worked or rubbed up against these old girls?
Input from Harold Kidd – Great pics of great boats! ANTARES is surely the Roger Carey ANTARES of 1963?
Update – photos below ex Cameron  Pollard

Could This Be Zephyr

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Could This Be Zephyr

Woody Nathan Herbert spotted the launch above on trademe – the photo show her name as Belinda Lee and the list says she was built in 1940, is 36’ in length.
Current zoom zoom is via a 1952 Ford 120hp diesel. The photos look a little scary but there are the bones of a good woody here if you had the time and budget to attach the above the waterline issues.
Current home is Christchurch, so that may limit her appeal to woodys north of Cook Straight, but the price at <$5k is right, if the Ford is healthy 😉
(b/w photo c.1948 ex K Ricketts)
So Woodys – was Belinda Lee, Zephyr in an other life?
18-02-2020 Update ex Andrea Collings
Andrea has located a couple of photos, see below.  Reproduction is not the best but we roll with that.. The one on the skid, is from when Andrea’s grandfather first brought her.  Andrea commented it has her grandmother, uncle (and she thinks her aunt). Andrea  believes she was having her motor removed.  Her grandfather (Mac Kelly) thought she was to thirsty and put a smaller engine in. 
The 2nd photo is of her has Mac standing and one of his sons sunbathing on her roof.
Andrea is not sure of dates for these photos but believes it would have to be in the 1950’s.
Zephyr remained in their family until about 1985 when she was sold to a man from Auckland who Andrea was told was the gent who took her bridge off. After that Andrea didnt know what happened to Zephyr until she received an email WW and then read Logan’s post.
Andrea has promised to continue to track down any more information and photos, so it can be added to her story.
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30-04-2020 The Continuing Story Of Zephyr

I have been recently contacted by Kevin Lyall who via his mother, Hope Lyall, has contributed more details and photos from the vessels past. Kevins grandfather was a previous owner names – Mac Kelly and mentioned also in Andrea Colling’s input above.
I’ll let Kevin & Hope tell their story.

“The completion of Zephyr was delayed until after WWII, as the government was going to commandeer her as a patrol boat. She was originally powered by a single 165Hp ChrisCraft marine petrol engine, taken from a twin engine WWII landing craft. Not sure if the HP is correct, had a look and could have been a K series or Hercules series engine?

Mum said the original engine was under the floor, but the new engine had an engine cover built which took up space in the cockpit. She was re-powered with a Lee’s marine diesel (Ford)

She sank at her mooring in Awaawaroa Bay late 1970’s or early 1980’s, due to an engine intake valve being left open. She may have sat floating at the mooring for several years after that  as I remember her being beached at Pipitewai Bay and sacks of mussels being removed from the hull,This may have been around the time she was sold on.

We used to visit the family farm at Awaawaroa Bay, board Zephyr at Maraetai Wharf and sit on the bow with our groceries for the trip over the Tamaki Strait, we did this a few times for school holidays and Christmas. Must have been pre 1981.

My mother and family did a lot of trips on Zephyr all around the Hauraki Gulf and out to Great Barrier Island in the 1950’s and 1960’s.
Many stories of fishing and visiting islands and meeting up with other boaties.”

Zephyr DEC1965

Dec’ 1965

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1970’s

Mystery Bay of Islands Launch (Raurangi ?) – 14-09-2018

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Mystery Bay of Islands Launch (Raurangi ?)- 14-09-2018

In both of the above photos we see a very smart day boat, in the boat house photo we also see beached a motor boat with what appears to be the name ‘Zephyr’ on her bow.
The photos come to use ex Ross Griffin, via the BOI’s Historic Photos fb.
Anyone able to ID the launch? She is rather cute i.e. not a workboat, so chances are someone will recall her, the gent aboard or the boasted.
Update from Hylton Edmonds – who has advised that the photos above originate from the late Coralie Hilton (nee Deeming) Collection via Gavin Bedgegood,  a Deeming relation too.
The new photo below, shows the young school boy (possibly a Deeming?) very proudly standing on what looks to be the same boat, newly launched.
10-07-2019 Harold Kidd Input – H.B. Melton ran her in the Russell Regatta race for launches 6 knots & under in early January 1913. She came third. She must have been launched no later than December 1912. Very up to date with that raised foredeck and neat dodger, an exact contemporary of Collings & Bell C & B JUNIOR, a very similar craft. A very pretty launch.
Coralie Hilton - 137

Safari

SAFARI HISTORY
 
From recollections of Zelda Batterton (Nee,  McGuire) eldest daughter of Trevor Innes McGuire.
8 December 2012
 
Safari was built by refrigeration engineer and inventor Trevor McGuire during World War II.
Trevor was a business ownerwho had several businesses over the years. One of these was a business making refrigerators for Bond and Bond, Fisher and Paykel and McAlpine. He also had a building business in Fiji and a sawmill in Samoa. Trevor was also a founder of the Royal Suva Yacht Club. Prior to McGuire refrigeration he owned a saw mill located in the Waitakere ranges where the firm ran a Kauri logging business.
 
During the war the refrigeration business manufactured sectioned coolrooms and commercial refrigerators, which were invented by Trevor. Some of these were used by the Americans to store their deceased soldiers in before they were shipped back to America. The business was originally in Manukau Rd in Epsom, with about 6 employees, and the boat was built in a field out the back of the factory. A new factory was later built at 25 Fairfax Avenue Penrose. The refrigeration business was eventually sold to Fisher and Paykel around 1947, and the Paykel families were known to be onboard Safari during for weekend excursions.
 
Boat designer Dick Lang was a friend of Trevor’s, the two met in Fiji and the plans used for the boat were Dick Lang’s. A sister boat,  “Zephyr” was built later using the same plans. Zephyr was built by the Ellerslie Mayor at the time Horace Whyte, also a friend of Trevor’s . Zelda recalls going into the forest to collect Pohutukawa for the knees. Apparently they had to be carefully selected to be the right shape but in those days it was okay to chop up native trees. The NZ sourced kauri timber Safari was built from came from Newmarket, most likely from Odins Timber Company.
 
Safari was launched around 1940 in Mechanics Bay after being shipped by truck from Manukau Rd.
Trevor’s wife Madge did not like the water but she always came out on Safari to do the cooking. As “petrol” was still scarce, anyone coming out on Safari would donate war time petrol coupons. Trevor always wore a hat and had a cigarette dangling from his lips. He also had a ‘twinkle in his eye.” Zelda says they were very lucky children to have such fantastic parents and a brilliant childhood. Many hours were spent on the boat although due to the shortage of petrol this was mostly around Waiheke and Rangitoto Island.
 
[Just between us Zelda say’s with a smile] Safari had 26 people on board to go out and meet the NZ warship Achilles. Trevor took Safari across the bow of Achilles and a loudhailer boomed out “Will that launch please get out of the way”, whereupon Trevor apparently said “We’re smaller than them, they have to give way.” Madge was not impressed.
 
During the war Safari’s boat ID number was 1263. All boats had to have a large number for identification. A boom was placed from Devonport to Bastion Point to deter enemy vessels, with a small gap in the middle that was closed at night. Trevor came back too late one day to meet the curfew and had to stay outside the boom, where spotlights would be beamed across the boat during the night.
 
In the early years Safari was extended in length by Trevor McGuire, Zelda seems to think from 33 or 34’ to 38’