Summer Boating in the Bay of Islands – Part 2

Marline
Orari II
Serene
Active

Summer Boating in the Bay of Islands – Part 2


Our resident B.O.I. woody – Dean Wright is a star, above is another batch of photos from the Bay of Islands. I was especially rapped to get the top two of Marline, WW readers will know that she spent several months at the end of last year I the shed at The Slipway Milford getting a top-chop. You can read / see more on that at the WW link below. Wonderful to see her back in the bay and with Ken Warne at the helm.

https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/09/14/marline-gets-a-top-chop/

https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/11/25/marline-back-in-the-water/

The very large – Galerina, is looking the sharpest in many a year – well done to whoever is caring for her. Can anyone put a name to the last photo, the launch with the game poles – its something like ‘Hattele’

I have been getting weather reports from back in the city that its been very wet – my garden will be very happy. But I can report that other than 2 hours of light rain on 01-01-2021, its as dry as a crisp. Photo below from Rakino – West Bay on the left and Woody Bay on the right. 
As always if you spot anyone or thing that might appeal to the WW readers, pull the phone out and snap a photo and send in to waitematawoodys@gmail.com

Serene

SERENE

photos & details ex Ken Ricketts, edited by Alan H

Serene was built by Roy Parris in the late 1950’s early 1960’s. She is approx. 36′ long & powered by a 6-354 Perkins diesel. She has had the same owners, Helen & Craig Brown of Whangarei for over 20 years & is kept at Opua & before that in front of their waterfront home in Whangarei.
The Browns bought her approx. 20years ago off an Italian living at Snells Beach who only owned her for 3 or 4 months & he had bought her of Garry Nordstrand who had owned her for a long time. To the best of the Browns knowledge Serene is the boats original name & she has spent all or almost all of her life in Northland from Algies Bay upwards. Her coamings were varnished until fairly recently as the surface had deteriorated so much they reluctantly made the hard call to paint them, with a thin new layer of timber like a veneer, beneath the new paint to improve the surface.