Flying Boats

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w 57 with len southwards red head racing

w 64 all blacks 51 to aust

FLYING BOATS

I have been sent the above collection of b/w photos that John Bullivant found on a British seaplane site, it appears a lot of the photos are from our national library or similar.  They give a snap shot into the Teal flying boat history in Wellington. In them we see a large clinker launch, a work boat (Wild Duck which has an identical sister), a Civil Aviation flarepath launch (the dark stepped cabin launch to right of jetty) two different Teal launches (one from Auckland for some reason) Len Southwards Red Head racing one of the planes and a few views of the larger Teal launch.

The Teal launch appears to have the engine box towards the stern so may have had a v-drive (more room in the cabin / safety / noise perhaps?) The group of fine gentlemen in the Teal launch (pipes and all) are some of the 1951 All Blacks departing for the test in Australia.

Wild Duck

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WILD DUCK

The top photo shows the 1932 JB Jukes built motor boat Wild Duck back in c.1937/38 in Wellington in one of her previous lives as a flying boat tender, during what looks like a refueling exercise. ) photo ex Richard Easton’s FB page) You can read & see more on her at the link below.

These days the Wild Duck is the mother ship to the Tino Rawa Trust classic yacht fleet.

The photos below were taken by Dean Wright & show her at anchor in the Bay of Islands.

The duck is a rather wide bottomed girl – I have included a photo of her alongside Raindance for comparison.

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Aussie 18′ Racing Woodys – Sailing Sunday

Aussie 18′ Racing Woodys – Sailing Sunday

Robin Elliott sent me the above link to a very cool video that Australian Ian Smith has just put up on-line of how he built a replica of the 1919 traditional seam-batten Sydney 18 footer – Britannia in 2001-2002. Its approx 15min long & covers from lofting to launch > sailing. Great footage & a good commentary.

Robin also shared the link below to the ‘The Open Boat’ website which is a treasure trove of videos on the Australian small wooden sailing world. Do not blame me if your still watching it hours later 🙂

http://www.openboat.com.au/videos.html

CYA 2017 Classic Regatta
I snapped a few quick photos, below, yesterday while I was heading over to Westhaven to fuel up & then decided to pop in at Regatta HQ for a cleansing ale. More photos tomorrow from the Regatta’s classic woody launch parade &  lunch cruise to Riverhead Hotel. If you are out & about this morning & want to see the fine collection of classic woody launches, we will be passing in front of the RNZYS at approx. 10.30am.

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Wild Duck

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WILD DUCK
photos ex Dean Wright, details ex Tino Rawa Trust

ww has spies everywhere 🙂

Last week Dean Wright sent me the above photos of Wild Duck anchored in Hahangarua (Norwegian) Bay, Moturua Island in the Bay of Islands. I suspect she was catching up on some R&R after the BOI Race Week.
The Wild Duck is the ‘mother ship’ to the Tino Rawa Trust fleet of classic yachts. She was built by JB Jukes in 1937 as a fishing boat (Reg # WN290) by “Joe” Jukes at his yard in Balaena Bay. Built of kauri using the carvel method she is 42′ x 12′ x 4’6″ and powered by a GM Detroit 371 85hp.

Wild Duck was named after an early immigrant ship to Wellington run by the Shaw Savill company.

Joe Jukes (1889-1956) started in business in 1919 after serving his time with Ted Bailey at Aotea Quay and returning from the First World War. He rapidly established a reputation for sound craftsmanship and built some outstanding  yachts, including Raukawa (1936) and several successful 14ft One Designs. His launches included Nereides (1925) and Vagabond (1926).
In her earlier years Wild Duck was owned by the South Seas Fishing Co and used as a tender to the Lyttelton-based ex-Hull trawler South Sea off the Chatham Islands.

By the late 1930s she was back in Wellington as a general purpose vessel. For example she was the vessel which refueled the Empire-class Short  flying boat Centaurus in Wellington in January 1938.

For several years Wild Duck was renamed Parera, the Maori name for the grey duck, but has now reverted to her original name.

Wild Duck has several restorations since being owned by TRT, to bring her into line with all the recommendations from her survey and maintain her in good order.  The stem post and rotten keelson has been replaced along with new floors and the replacement of broken ribs. The two coreten metal tanks have been replaced with lighter weight plastic tanks.  A new engine room bulkhead has been installed and the entire vessels interior and exterior has been stripped, repaired, fared and painted. A new shaft-log, s/s shaft and bronze mounts have been fabricated and installed. A new wet exhaust has been installed.

She may look slightly ‘commercial’ in these photos but the interior is very cool.

UPDATE: Wild Duck Hauled Out @ Milford (August 2017)