Manu Moana

MANA MOANA


Built in 1975 at the Salthouse yard using 3 skin kauri. Powered by twin 425hp Detroit diesels, giving a max speed of 16knots and cruise of 10 knots. Mana Moana  at 59’ in length, has a 18’ beam and draws 4’9″ but what sets her apart from most other woodys of the that length is the volume – she is huge – as an example – 3 cabins, 3 heads and 4 showers.

Originally built for the German Consul and then skippered and bought by John Pulham from Tauranga. Ken Winter was the next owners from 1982 > 1992. 
(Tech & ownership details supplied by Allan Winter via K Ricketts) 

AUCTION OF VINTAGE NAUTICAL INSTRUMENTS

Chris McMullen gave me a heads up on a very special auction of vintage nautical instruments taking place tomorrow at the Cordys auction house.The items are from The Harvey Sheppard collection, a close friend of Chris’s – Link below to website / catalogue. https://www.cordys.co.nz/auctions/D002/catalogue

SS Dancer

SS DANCER 
During the recent Lake Rotoiti Classic and Wooden Boat show I spotted the steam boat – Dancer, her owner and builder John Olsen supplied the following details. 

Dancer is a 30 foot long steam launch, designed by Peter Sewell and built by John and his wife Diana. The engine is a compound twin, designed by A.A Leak and built by John. The boiler is a 3 drum type.designed by Andre Pointon. (Colonial Iron Works) and also built by John apart from welding by a certified welder. In the top photo, the tender on the Aft deck is a folding dinghy, called Kahikitea and mostly built from that timber.


Dancer is equipped for sleeping aboard, with a head compartment and blackwater tank, a small galley with gas cooker, sink, and fridge, and solar panels on the cabin top to provide electric power. The boiler is fired with diesel. Myself I like wood/coal fired but her diesel set up must make life a lot simpler, and we like that 🙂

Can We Identify The Launch + Worldwide Classic Boat Show

Can We Identify The Launch

The above Bay of Islands photo comes to us via Diane Keene’s post on fb and is from the photo album of her grandmother – Joyce Simpson. The grandmother’s diaries indicate that the photo was taken on 6th Feb 1963, and the primary focus of the photo was the submarine. Diane has checked with the RNZN & they have informed her it is either the submarine HMS Andrew which attended the 1960 Waitangi Day ceremonies, or of the submarine HMS Tapir which was present in 1963 when HM Queen Elizabeth was in attendance aboard HMY Britannia.


Putting subs to one side, Dianne enquired about the identity of the launch on the left – if my life depended on it I would say – Menai, the 1937 built Sam Ford launch, but there is no mast and she seems to have always sported one, as a second option I would say – Ian Gavin’s family launch – Florence Dawn, built in 1947 by Richard Hartley. Anyone agree or have another suggestion?

THE WORLDWIDE CLASSIC BOAT SHOW – Feb 19>28
created by the folks at Off Center Harbor

This is very cool and worth checking out – there will be hundreds of the world’s finest boats, each with its own web page with photos and description + interviews with top boat builders, museums, sail makers, festivals, etc. Effectively everything happening in classic boats around the world, all in one place.

Location:  Online at ClassicBoatShow.com
Tickets:  $5 (seriously)

THE “WHY?” BEHIND THE SHOW:
When the pandemic started the festivals, schools, yards, and museums that are the lifeblood of the classic boating world began shutting down for distancing. 
At that moment, Off Center Harbor committed to utilize our worldwide
audience to highlight those doing great work and bring everyone in the world of classic boats closer together.
That dream becomes a reality with the Worldwide Classic Boat Show.

HOW IT WORKS:

Purchasing a digital “ticket” provides you full access to the Boat Show’s website during the 10 days of the Show.  It gives you full unlimited access to everything, including the live presentations. Live presentations will be recorded and available for the entire show beginning the day after the presentation (maybe sooner). There are no physical paper tickets — as you check out and pay, you’ll choose a username and a password for logging in, and that login will be your “ticket” to the show (so write it down).

BUY A SHOW TICKET HERE

3 Classic Yacht Collisions In 2 Weeks…….

Library image ex Ingrid Abery

WHAT IS GOING ON WITH THE A-CLASS CLASSIC RACE FLEET – EGOTISM, ARROGANCE OR JUST INCOMPETENCE ?


You may have missed my comments at the bottom of Mondays WW story, and over the last 48 hours it has emerged that in the last two weeks we have had three serious incidents involving three different A-Class classic yachts, I have detailed descriptions of each incident, but I’ll stay out of the technicalities. Questions of the day – is there a review underway of these incidents? who takes responsibility for the circumstances surrounding the incidents i.e. race starts and finishes? Are there health and safety procedures in place for the ‘worst case scenario’?.

Even if you put any blame to one side, 3 incidents in 2 weeks………………… something is amiss. Me thinks it is time for a fire side skippers chat on rules and good manners.


INCIDENT ONE – Mahurangi Weekend – Sunday Morning – A Class yacht (under power) collides with classic launch – I understand no apology from yacht

INCIDENT TWO – CYA Race Mahurangi > Auckland – Sunday Morning – A Class gaff yacht T-bones another vessel at the start – Other vessel on starboard – near sinking

INCIDENT THREE – CYA Round Rangitoto Yacht Race – A Class gaff yacht collides with finish boat (classic launch) – Again no apology, just laughing


The CYA has its major annual sailing regatta coming up next week – if you’re out and about in your boat- might be a good idea to fender up 😉

22-02-2021 Input From Robin Kenyon

Re Racing at the MCC regatta:
I think safety at Mahurangi was greatly improved this year by having the A class racing the outer loop first, therefore greatly reducing the time spent racing in the confines of the estuary and other racers/spectators. My big plea to the organisers would be for the MCC to affiliate themselves to Yachting New Zealand. Then the racing could be held under the more familiar (to racing and coastal sailors) Racing Rules of Sailing. This would remove a large degree of uncertainty that exists when racing at Mahurangi and help prevent a future accident in waiting. Every other race that the A class does uses these rules, not the COLREGS (except on passage races outside the hours of daylight, I believe). I appreciate that this incurs a cost to the MCC but surely the levy to YNZ is just what has to be done. The vast majority of other clubs in the country pay it.
I have raced regattas in countries all over the world and this is the only one that I have been to that uses COLREGS for daytime racing.
Uncertainty could breed the attitude amongst some that might just blag their way through a fleet rather than abiding to the very clear and proven racing rules of sailing. Stating that their will be no protests must only add to these competitors feeling untouchable.
Whilst this is only one aspect covered by the comments above (and thankfully there were no serious accidents at this years regatta yacht race) I think it has some relevance to the bigger picture. I must have done about 10 Mahurangi regattas, all racing on the A class. The heated on the water interactions for this race are often worse than any other race in our calendar.
Which is a shame for a fun event and a true highlight of the season. It doesn’t need to be that way and using the Racing Rules of Sailing can go a long way to address this. The COLREGS were never written with sailboat racing in mind. That is what the Racing Rules of Sailing are for. When skippering an A class around the harbour the skippers have enough on their plate without having the rethink the rule book.

22-02-2021 Update ex the CYA Feb Newsletter – lets hope they read this, tucked away at the bottom of the newsletter 🙂

Waione Restoration Update #2

WAIONE RESTORATION UPDATE #2


Today’s story sees us taking a peek inside the boat shed at Quayside Marine, Mahurangi where Daniel Taylor is putting the finishing touches to his families launch – Waione. Daniel is the 3rd generation to own the boat. Taking over from his father Steve and grandparents Jack and Missy McCabe.

Waione has appeared on WW before – links below.Daniel by trade is a marine electrician so the fit out is A1.

Photos taken by Daniel and sent in by K Ricketts.
https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/10/24/waione-restoration-update/
https://waitematawoodys.com/2016/07/06/waione/

FREE TO GOOD HOME – BUT BE QUICK (>24HRS)

The Roy Parris launch (sub 20’) below has washed up on an inner harbour beach (broke her nearby mooring) and will most likely be salvaged and taken to the landfill within the next 24hrs. The photos are 2+ years old, but give you an idea of what she could look like again. The last photo is as of yesterday. Perfect opportunity for someone wanting a winter project. The engine is outboard in a well – I believe the intention is to sell the o/board (75hp) to re coup salvage costs. Contact owner on 027 254 9442 – but do it now.

RIP BERT WOOLCOTT

Sadly I report that Bert Woolcott, partner of Margaret, passed away last Friday in hospital, aged 76. While a lot of woodys that have had the privilege of attending the annual CYA Patio Bay, Waiheke Island weekend will be familiar with Bert and Margret’s legendary hospitality, most wouldn’t be aware of the volunteer work Bert did in the background – on Classic Race Committees, skippering finish boats at classic regattas and club racing. Bert always made the time to chat and would always enquire about your vessel and more importantly how you were.

Bert was a big man with a big heart and leaves a big hole in the classic boating movement. Fair Winds.
A funeral service for Bert will be held in the Main Chapel of the Morrison Funeral Home on Friday the 19th of February 2021 at 3.00 p.m 

Big Boats In The Bay

ADVENTURE
MONOWAI III

BIG BOATS IN THE BAY

Dean Wright recently slipped the lines on Arethusa and has been mooching around the Bay of Islands. Today’s gallery of photos includes the very salty looking Adventure in Deep Water Cove, also there was the Auckland woody – Callisto. Also featured is Andy and Brenda Bell’s Monowai III and Jim Ashby’s Olga, Dean commented that Olga is a serious bit of kit. She sure is, looks like you could go anywhere in her. Would love to know move about Olga, can anyone give Jim Ashby a nudge and ask him to send WW some background on the boat.


Lastly we see the remains of the burnt out Fleming 55 being lifted from the bottom between Moturua and Motukiekie Islands on Saturday (13-02-21), post the lift Dean saw the barge heading out to sea – probably for a deep water burial, anyone able to confirm? Photos of the boat fire here https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/12/31/summer-woody-boating-in-the-bay-of-islands/


The only downside of Dean’s reporting is we never get to see photos of his stunning woody – Arethusa 🙂 see below

https://waitematawoodys.com/2020/09/07/arethusas-new-woody-wheelhouse/#jp-carousel-49128

ARETHUSA

Round Rangitoto Island Classic Race and BBQ

ROUND RANGITOTO ISLAND CLASSIC RACE & BBQ

Saturday was a first (in a long time) on the classic launch scene – we had a launch race around Rangitoto (+ Motutapu) , now a race is not that unusual , but female skippers only (helms person) is – the winning skipper on Kumi would have failed a chromosome test but the race committee (Jason Prew) was swayed by the skippers attire 🙂

The post race BBQ at Islington Bay  proved more popular than the race and 11 woodys dropped anchor in the bay for the BBQ. We all tend to forget about this location, great sunsets and easy anchorage. Cool video of My Girl sliding back down the harbour at dusk. On route I caught the tail-end charlies in the yacht fleet who also raced around the island – photos below.

A question – if you’re a large A-Class gaffer (no names but its painted black) and you constantly finish at the back of the fleet, as you did again on Saturday, why would you sail so close to a mark that you hit it? The rules say you are out of the race for that – BUT what makes it worse is when the mark is a classic launch and it is the finish boat, and all the yacht crew do is laugh 😦  The invoice for repairs will be in the mail. Yachties wonder why launch owners do not put their hand up when asked to perform this task, I suspect they will struggle even more for ‘volunteers’ in the future 🙂

UPDATE– Combine the above with another A-Class yacht (no Prize for guessing which one it was) colliding (yacht in the wrong) with a very large classic launch at Mahurangi and the yacht skippers / crew post collision arrogance – the CYA maybe needs to have a wee chat re rules and manners. Just because your are a classic yacht you don’t get any special privileges 😉

Te Ata Koura

TE ATA KOURA
Todays launch – Te Ata Koura , according to her tme listing (thanks Ian McDonald) was built by Shipbuilders, she is 32’ in length and constructed via single plank carvel / kauri. She has a beam of 10’ and draws 3’. 

Powered by a 1990 85hp Ford Dover diesel, that gives her a very respectable top speed of 10 knots.From the photos and comments she is in need of some TLC but the bones are there and would make a very smart woody.


I would say there has been a name change along the way, which won’t help ID’ing her, but keen to hear from anyone that can provide more details on her.

Monita

MONITA


Tony Brewer contacted me regarding his recent purchase of – Monita a 17’ Mason Marlin which was built by Sutton Mason & Co. Ltd in Mt Roskill, Auckland sometime in the 1950’s.  She is powered by a 2003 90hp 4stroke Honda, which Tony feels maybe to heavy.  He is considering re-powering with a 2013 Mercury Mariner 50hp ELPTO 2stroke. Tony’s not interested in a high top speed but would like to be able to travel at between 15 to 18 knots.  Fuel economy is not an issue as they do not travel far and there would usually be only 2 people on board.


So woodys – the question of the day is – would the boat be under powered with the 50hp motor?

Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta – Thank God For The Classics

1963

Auckland Anniversary Day Regatta – Thank God For The Classics


Ok, I’m going to upset a few – but……. I ask the question – has the AAR passed its use by date?

I think the answer is yes, in its present format. If it wasn’t for the classic fleet i.e. old boats (tugs, work boats, classic launches and yachts) there wouldn’t be many boats on the harbour on anniversary day. Maybe time for a reset, now here’s a thought – merge the event with the Classic Yacht Association’s annual classic regatta.

The reality is changing lifestyles and if people are honest, the Bay of Islands – Sailing Week has robbed the AAR of most of the modern sailing fleet. They in fact claim to be “the biggest regatta of its kind in NZ and one of the Southern Hemisphere’s premier yachting events” – not that long ago the AAR made similar claims. And on top of this the continuing growth of the Mahurangi Regatta that attracts huge numbers of wooden boats from near and far.

The AAR has being a happening thing for over 180 years, it would be a shame for it to continue to die a slow death, now’s the time to ask the big questions and future proof its existence – as an aside a large chunk of the AAR people are linked / involved with the CYA so should not be too hard…………Now where’s my hat – I’m leaving the room 🙂


Video footage for the 2021 regatta below – if you’re only into classic launches fast forward to the 1:14 mark 🙂