Manaia – A Peek Down Below

Manaia – A Peek Down Below

Manaia was built by Shipbuilders and is approx. 36’ in length. Powered by a 117hp John Deere diesel engine.

Home is Picton, if you hadn’t already picked that from her design / features and finish.

And that woodys is all her tme (thanks Ian McDonald) listing tells us.

Quite a salty looking craft – keen to learn more about her.

05-12-2022 UPDATE ex owner – Gary Jamieson.

“We bought Manaia through 36 degrees broker’s on 9th March. The broker was whining about it not being worth his trouble for the tiny commission he would get. I pointed out that he sold her twice in 4 days. Somebody wanted the Picton marina berth not Manaia.
She has had a make over as per the photos you have, tongue and groove macrocarpa straight over existing timber, obviously was quite rough.
Engine is aprox 30 years old, was bought for a new build that never happened and it sat in a shed in Albany, has 1267 hours on it now.
Took her to Akaroa for a joy ride, a lovely sea boat, came home on the back of a dying southerly gale, she surfs quite politely.
This next bit is comedic in a way. The trip to Akaroa revealed some fueling problems, long story short new filters and fuel pump (old/new) motor issues and a persistent air leak grr. There are invoices and log book entries for filters and oil change etc from a local Picton mechanic, I don’t think the work was ever done. The water trap filter was so blocked the engine was sucking air past the bowl gasket, fuel lines form there back to tanks sludged up too. The funny bit, while dealing to that filter I checked all the fasteners in that area and found all the bonding wires loose so duely tightened them cleaned the shaft and brush of grease and made good all the electrical connections. The bonding and anode system went straight to work and set about destroying a very sound boat. It was only by chance that I found your site and the link to the horror stories about bonding etc. Was on board today disconnecting all that stuff and yes there is evidence of caustic soda on the one keel bolt I ‘repaired’ after only 4 weeks. I found the evidence 2 days ago while greasing the stern gland. It seems that all the bonding wires were only ever finger tight and never really connected thereby saving her from a miserable death. Probably only done at the refit. This is the only time I can honestly say thank goodness for shoddy workmanship.
Anyway all I know is she was Lady May, was relaunching in 2012 as Manaia and we think she is a great wee boat. I have been in contact with the previous owner in Manawatu and can make contact again if you want to know more. “

4 thoughts on “Manaia – A Peek Down Below

  1. We bought Manaia through 36 degrees broker’s on 9th March. The broker was whining about it not being worth his trouble for the tiny commission he would get. I pointed out that he sold her twice in 4 days. Somebody wanted the Picton marina berth not Manaia.
    She has had a make over as per the photos you have, tongue and groove macrocarpa straight over existing timber, obviously was quite rough.
    Engine is aprox 30 years old, was bought for a new build that never happened and it sat in a shed in Albany, has 1267 hours on it now.
    Took her to Akaroa for a joy ride, a lovely sea boat, came home on the back of a dying southerly gale, she surfs quite politely.
    This next bit is comedic in a way. The trip to Akaroa revealed some fueling problems, long story short new filters and fuel pump (old/new) motor issues and a persistent air leak grr. There are invoices and log book entries for filters and oil change etc from a local Picton mechanic, I don’t think the work was ever done. The water trap filter was so blocked the engine was sucking air past the bowl gasket, fuel lines form there back to tanks sludged up too. The funny bit, while dealing to that filter I checked all the fasteners in that area and found all the bonding wires loose so duely tightened them cleaned the shaft and brush of grease and made good all the electrical connections. The bonding and anode system went straight to work and set about destroying a very sound boat. It was only by chance that I found your site and the link to the horror stories about bonding etc. Was on board today disconnecting all that stuff and yes there is evidence of caustic soda on the one keel bolt I ‘repaired’ after only 4 weeks. I found the evidence 2 days ago while greasing the stern gland. It seems that all the bonding wires were only ever finger tight and never really connected thereby saving her from a miserable death. Probably only done at the refit. This is the only time I can honestly say thank goodness for shoddy workmanship.
    Anyway all I know is she was Lady May, was relaunching in 2012 as Manaia and we think she is a great wee boat. I have been in contact with the previous owner in Manawatu and can make contact again if you want to know more. Feel free to edit, delete what ever you want.
    Regards GaryJamieson.

    Like

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