Mystery Yacht – Sailing Sunday

Unknown

Mystery Yacht – Sailing Sunday

Barbara Cooke sent me the above photo of this very cute yacht moored in Barrys Bay, Akaroa Harbour.

Snapped from on-board Trinidad as she mooches her way back North.

Any of the southern woodys able to ID the yacht & supply details?

MANUTARA

Pictured below is the 1946 Salthouse designed & built yacht Manutara, she built with the intention of racing the Sydney to Hobart race, but this never eventuated. These days she is owned by Ray Shoebridge & earns her keep doing charter work out of Akaroa – details & photo also ex Barbara C.

Unknown

 

GLEAM 

I popped down to the Salthouse (ex) yard yesterday to catch up with some of the steam boat crowd & while there spotted Neil Chalmers old yacht Gleam at the wharf – looking very smart – Neil will be very chuffed to see her being loved & back in the hands of the family of the designer / builder – JB Brooke.

P1020637

P1020641

Input from Barbara Cooke – Manutara was designed by Jack Muir in 1946. And built by Salthouse Boat Builders in 1962. John Salthouse remembers her being the second full build after setting up the yard at Greenhithe in 1960.
Gleam is now owned by Chris (Curly) Salthouse.

5 thoughts on “Mystery Yacht – Sailing Sunday

  1. It is good to see Gleam looking so well. I crewed on board for a couple of seasons about 1960/1 when she was co-owned by David Robinson and Richard (Fred) Lintott. We had heaps of fun racing every summer weekend in Squadron races and enjoyed a lot of success. A big achievement was beating Cotton Blossom IV into Muddy Bay during one race. Easter events to Te Kouma were another we enjoyed, when full provisions consisted of a bilge full of beer bottles, and food was a large loaf of bread, a block of cheese, and a big bottle of pickled onions! Our sail number then was C22, and we raced against others of the class like Queenie and Norseman (?).
    Gleam was a wet boat, being so narrow in the beam, and everything we took aboard had to be stored in a plastic bag. But even after a cold, wet race,. when we had wondered if it was all worth while, the first beer after washing the boat down, and storing the gear, was like nectar.

    Like

  2. Jock Muir, not Jack
    The little double-ender is what is known in Scandinavia as a “Spitsgatter” (“Spitzgatter?”), a general type of small yacht. Pretty little things – I hope someone gives this one the TLC she’s plainly in need of.There aren’t many of this type in NZ; the smallest I know of is the little “Saga” that “Pop” Jorgenson built not long after he came to NZ.
    Tumlaren are a specific design, a sort of refined and racier version of the general type. Elegant.

    Like

  3. Similar to your old Tumlaren Valiant Tim , but maybe smaller , still definitely of Scandinavian type

    Like

  4. Manutara was designed by Jack Muir in 1946. And built by Salthouse Boat Builders in 1962. John Salthouse remembers her being the second full build after setting up the yard at Greenhithe in 1960.
    Gleam is now owned by Chris (Curly) Salthouse.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s