Petrel


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PETREL
The posts last week on the Philip Lange built vessel Faith have resulted in Sharon Lange (Sharon, married Philip & Bev’s son, Ian Lange) sending in the above photos of ‘Petrel’, the last boat built by Philip. Petrel was build under Philip and Bev’s Mill Bay house in Mangonui and launched in 1991.

Petrel was build for Philips son Stev and is used as a commercial longline boat out of Mangonui to present day.

The photos, from the top, are tagged:
1: The Petrel on the cradle front lawn of Philips house
2: close up
3: Getting ready to go down the drive to Mill bay for launching
4: Philip lange on the Petrel during launching , Stev Lange on the ramp , Bev at the front and Ian lange ready to help and Phils grand daughter watching the action
5: Philip Lange and the Petrel
6: Bev Lange & the Petrel
7: the Petrel
8: speaks for its self

The New Zealand Clinker
In support of last weekends Classic Yacht & Launch Exhibition, the Tino Rawa Trust have produced a 36 page booklet titled ‘ The New Zealand Clinker, its a great collection of stories on & around clinker boats. I enjoyed the read & learnt a lot.
You can grab a copy for $20 from BoatBooks in Westhaven or try your luck with answering the question below, all correct entries, emailed to waitematawoodys@gmail.com before 6pm 10-10-2017, go into the draw for a copy.

Q: Where does the word ‘clinker’ originate from?

Clinker Cover

Clinker Spread

Input from Russell Ward

A glossary in the pre WW2 book Motor Cruising by Irvine and others confirms that “Clinker (clincher, clencher) is a method of building in which each side plank overlaps the one below.”
Now, shipmates, we gotta drill a bit deeper into this one, maybe. Clenching or clench nailing is the merry art of holding an iron or hammer just right and picking up the sharp end of your nail as she emerges through the other side and turning it over and back into the wood (provided the wood is soft enough). Quick and easy and, if done neatly looks a lot better than it sounds. I sent a picture via Wifi to AH just now -qv. Iona had a lot of old epaired timbers clinched and it looked good.
The Yanks of course call “clinker” by the more descriptive term “lapstrake”. So Robin Seaward in ‘Boatbuilding’ 2ed says “Lapstrake -sometimes called clinker planking.”
However, I find this appealing “Late 17th century (denoting a person or thing that clinks): from clink + -er. clinker”. Do you reckon that the wisened old man crouched over the wee boat in the corner of the shed was clinking away at his craft?
(Personally I like the old-fashioned slang use for a bum note played on a musical instrument -a clinker! Or in my favourite town Galway, a clinker is a wee lass worthy of a very close inspection. Or modern slang says a clinker is a dingle berry. Nothing to do with our boats though.) Better watch where you use the term.
Take yer pick, fellow anorak wearers…..

Unknown

12 thoughts on “Petrel

  1. Ah, Oh wise one: Of course, I am sure that your word is our command. However, in a previous life, I did a couple of papers in the Law and it seemed to be very nit picking in approach. I just assumed that we had to get it right or be eternally damned…….

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  2. Will you guys accept the definitions of “clinker” and “ro(o)ve” in the Shorter Oxford or will you continue to faff on about the sound of the water tinkling on the strakes? If so, I’ll hire a crane to get it off the bookshelves.

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  3. Can’t find any other examples of “rooves”. It’s all “roves” all the way down, Murray as you point out of course. Howard Chapelle opines in 1941 in “Boatbulding” at p 453: “…. to rivet, use copper nails. With these, obtain burrs (small washers) to fit…… Tap the nail through with the head driven home. then force the burr, or “rove” over the point…… QED. Edgar Marsh might have made a typo that has laid undetected way back nearly 70 yrs ago. And we found it right here!
    BTW, Chapelle says “Clenching a nail is somewhat harder and requires practice…. the hook may be formed with a pair of round nosed pliers after which….. the head is tapped down smooth.” But note, in his next breath, the learned Howard says: “The point of the nail hooked over must not re-enter in the same line of grain; it must cross the grain at nearly right angles or splitting will result.” Blow me down with a steamroller! Faith I never known that!
    I quite like Simon’s onomatopoeic allusion that the clinker is named for the unmistakable tinkle as the strakes cleave the briny. Sure turns the head on a flat calm night after all the Yamaha-driven inflatables have gurgled past leaving our hero behind sculling proudly.

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  4. Quoting from one of the Bibles of Brit Boating Books: “Sailing Drifters” by Edgar J Marsh 1952 p 37 ….The planks were nailed together at distances of a few inches with copper nails clenched inside over copper washers known as “rooves,” hence the name clench-built -variously known as clencher, clincher, clinker or lapstrake in which the strakes overlap….. Marsh was relying on a lot of information of the day but his books this and Sailing Trawlers (as well as other books on traditional British ships) also contain stories from way back into the previous century and earlier. Interviews and papers from the men who did it in the day.
    So clench built embraced using rooves (as we now call riveting) and not just binging the sharp end over and back on itself. If you’ll bear with me, I’ll excavate another text in the mancave….

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  5. From clinch, or clench, a common Teutonic word, meaning “to fasten together” says Wikipedia. Sounds right to me.

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  6. A glossary in the pre WW2 book Motor Cruising by Irvine and others confirms that “Clinker (clincher, clencher) is a method of building in which each side plank overlaps the one below.”
    Now, shipmates, we gotta drill a bit deeper into this one, maybe. Clenching or clench nailing is the merry art of holding an iron or hammer just right and picking up the sharp end of your nail as she emerges through the other side and turning it over and back into the wood (provided the wood is soft enough). Quick and easy and, if done neatly looks a lot better than it sounds. I sent a picture via Wifi to AH just now -qv. Iona had a lot of old epaired timbers clinched and it looked good.
    The Yanks of course call “clinker” by the more descriptive term “lapstrake”. So Robin Seaward in ‘Boatbuilding’ 2ed says “Lapstrake -sometimes called clinker planking.”
    However, I find this appealing “Late 17th century (denoting a person or thing that clinks): from clink + -er. clinker”. Do you reckon that the wisened old man crouched over the wee boat in the corner of the shed was clinking away at his craft?
    (Personally I like the old-fashioned slang use for a bum note played on a musical instrument -a clinker! Or in my favourite town Galway, a clinker is a wee lass worthy of a very close inspection. Or modern slang says a clinker is a dingle berry. Nothing to do with our boats though.) Better watch where you use the term.
    Take yer pick, fellow anorak wearers…..

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  7. derives from the Nordic (Germany). Today the klinker in Holland refers to the sound so could be a reference to the sound of the water against the hull

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  8. A: From “clencher” because boats are “clench fastened”. The terms “clinker built” and “clencher built” are both used in the UK, where they originated. No doubt the word “clench” has even older derivations.

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