Lady Eileen


LADY EILEEN
photos & report ex Hylton Edmonds via Ken Ricketts. edited by Alan H

Ken reports that Hylton, who bought Lady Eileen the 1947 Shipbuilders/SupaCraft bridge-decker approx. a year ago & relocated her to his property at Tapu Point in the Bay of Islands, is now 8 months into an extensive refit/refurb. You will see from the above photos that Hylton has rather a nice ‘shed’ & has retained the services of some true craftsman to undertake the work.
ww followers may recall that after her previous live-a-board owner passed away, Lady Eileen was listed on trademe for a long time. Lady Eileen is a very lucky boat to now have Hylton as her custodian & based on the standard of the work completed to date, despite being 68 years old, she will be relaunched better than new.
We look forward to more update.

Search Lady Eileen in the ww search box to see early photos.

Update from Russell Ward who you will see is a fan 🙂

Oh sterling effort, Mr Edmonds. Ten points/five stars for your effort! And a most deserving ship to lavish all that effort on. A super SuperCraft job!
Tim Windsor was the in-house designer at Shipbuilders at the time and Lady Eileen and her half sisters Mahara, Rosemary and Rakanoa were all just right. Mahara (just the same cabin arrangement) being a much shorter boat still worked OK (and that was hard to do); but Eileen managed to draw it out much better with the extra length.
Have a squint and admire the details. Humour me…. That graceful sheer, little kick up aft, the rubbing strakes that set it off (get one of those wrong and it would spoil it); the curvaceous tops to the toe rail fwd (Mahara was the same) -almost a turtle deck effect. The cabin tops -just a little curve in them fore and aft. Look at the curved edges to the tops of the fwd wheelhouse screens. A lesser designer would have had them angular and would have put three in. He might have put an eyebrow atop them and again detracted from it. Admire the treatment of the alternate windows/portholes aft -all four had that. It is mimicked up fwd too. Yep, everything just right. The flying bridge -a later add on is not bad -works OK because she is a big boat.
I surmise that Shipbuilders still had the men that were there during WW2 doing Fairmiles and the like -the knowledge capital/ expertise. Tim had trained by correspondence from the USA, I heard once. Anyone got anything else on his history?
Oh, say again. Well done (doing?) Hylton!

Work Report from the owner – 23-05-2015

Sadly the cabin sides are well passed returning to varnish (which in any case would have been the old imitation graining system so popular back in that era through to the 60’s, ex Pilot Boat Waitemata was a classic example).

I feel though, with a combination of refurbished varnished pieces and all her refurbished chrome, she  will still look the (glamourous) Hunter’s  Lady Eileen, as follows;

1.    Hand rails (on refurbished stainless steel stanchions – added at time of flying bridge 20 years ago)
2.    Skylight (original)
3.    Dorade boxes (original complete with refurbished Chrome Bronze cowls)
4.    Mast
5.    New Teak Wheelhouse doors (sadly the old ones were full of gravings, repairs and freshwater rot and have been “retired”)
6.    Entire Flying Bridge . The internal panel is painted out now,  accentuating the shear and considered by all –  a great improvement on this “large” addition.
7.    Oregon Boat hooks (with chrome tips) on new Teak cradles
8.    Cockpit Coamings (attached is a photo with just 3 coats of Uroxsys on to protect in the interim before final 6 more coats)
9.    Foredeck Teak Hatch (original)
10.    Name Boards (with chrome letters)
11.    Ensign Mast
12.    And…..if one can procure the original Clinker Dinghy or suitable replacement……

Lady Clair (L) & Lady Eileen at Gulf Harbour May’14

Lady Clair (L) & Lady Eileen at Gulf Harbour May'14

28-04-2016 Work in progress photos ex Ken Ricketts (17 April)

 

15 thoughts on “Lady Eileen

  1. Pingback: Lady Eileen Launch Day + Classic 4 Sale | waitematawoodys.com #1 for classic wooden boat stories, info, advice & news

  2. Pingback: Albacora | waitematawoodys.com – the classic wooden boat blog

  3. Hi Hilton, Looks fantastic. If you are looking for the dinghy, please give me a call.
    Allan Keane 021945152

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  4. Hi Nathan, great that you asked about the varnish (don’t take any notice of Cam and his “White Varnish”… good mind to sneak down and give “Dorothy” a surprise one day… !). One other part of Lady Eileen that is being retired I hope people agree with, (actually being replaced with same diameter but polished SS heavy wall tube) is the varnished wooden handrails. You may agree with me, these usually let go when you really need them most!!. I can still see the look of surprise on the face of a good workmate “sailing” over the side, his white knuckle’s gripping a section of freshly parted wooden handrail of a Harbour Board work-boat we were working on at the time. Needless to say, we were all full of “sympathy” for him when he finally surfaced. “Cheered” us up no end actually……

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  5. A mention was made of the Waitemata’s wood graining. I remember watching that being done once when she was working-she was alongside Queens Wharf round from the tugs on the end (happy days). I sat for a hour or so waiting for Aucklander and Daldy to come back from berthing a ship -to watch how they came in and to talk my way on board to see the machinery yet again.
    The man did pretty well the whole port side of Waitemata joins in the wood at the corner pillars etc, knots and all. It was painted the base light brown colour to start. People in my antique alter life talked of graining combs and such, but this man just seemed to use a small paintbrush and a wide stiff one to “dust” the paint off.
    The classy boats had graining -there were many styles (I guess it depended on the combs used) and it was common. They used to varnish over the top of it didn’t they?
    Oh meant to say that a darker part on the upperworks breaks up an otherwise wall of white which is why I painted the lower part of Movarie’s coamings a lighter brown. They are now blue I see.

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  6. Very good, however what I wrote that as an allusion to my own boat’s un-varnishable timbers and in no way as a criticism of another mans boat. Pet hate of mine having yard walkers come and give uninformed and unsolicited opinions while I am doing the best I can with what I have and as such wouldn’t ever do it to another

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  7. looks like another superb restoration about to hit our cruising grounds. I commend you for your efforts and trust you able to thoroughly enjoy your hard work.

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  8. Nathan, Have just had the following reply re our mutual concerns of the coamings finish — I quote;
    For your friend Nathan, please tell him to allay his concerns, – that a fair amount of bright-work will still be retained and brought back on Lady Eileen.

    Sadly the cabin sides are well passed returning to varnish (which in any case would have been the old imitation graining system so popular back in that era through to the 60’s, ex Pilot Boat Waitemata was a classic example).

    I feel though, with a combination of refurbished varnished pieces and all her refurbished chrome, she will still look the (glamourous) Hunter’s Lady Eileen, as follows;

    1. Hand rails (on refurbished stainless steel stanchions – added at time of flying bridge 20 years ago)
    2. Skylight (original)
    3. Dorade boxes (original complete with refurbished Chrome Bronze cowls)
    4. Mast
    5. New Teak Wheelhouse doors (sadly the old ones were full of gravings, repairs and freshwater rot and have been “retired”)
    6. Entire Flying Bridge . The internal panel is painted out now, accentuating the shear and considered by all – a great improvement on this “large” addition.
    7. Oregon Boat hooks (with chrome tips) on new Teak cradles
    8. Cockpit Coamings (attached is a photo with just 3 coats of Uroxys on to protect in the interim before final 6 more coats)
    9. Foredeck Teak Hatch (original)
    10. Name Boards (with chrome letters)
    11. Ensign Mast
    12. And…..if one can procure the original Clinker Dinghy or suitable replacement……

    Like

  9. Oh dear, we’re starting another cycle of debate on RAKANOA! I’m cringing already. BUT RAKANOA started off as a design by Bill Couldrey which is why she’s quite distinct from LADY EILEEN et al. Just go back with the Search function in WW.

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  10. Are the colours outdoors how she will be looking? I’m a varnish fanboy so it hurts to see such perfect clean coamings covered up again! Jealous mostly, as I don’t have the option with all the joins and different timbers in my own.

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  11. Just one thing, RAKANOA was NOT one of the “Supa Craft” (not “Super”) group, — That has always seen very important to various people associated with her — building & otherwise

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  12. Oh sterling effort, Mr Edmonds. Ten points/five stars for your effort! And a most deserving ship to lavish all that effort on. A super SuperCraft job!
    Tim Windsor was the in-house designer at Shipbuilders at the time and Lady Eileen and her half sisters Mahara, Rosemary and Rakanoa were all just right. Mahara (just the same cabin arrangement) being a much shorter boat still worked OK (and that was hard to do); but Eileen managed to draw it out much better with the extra length.
    Have a squint and admire the details. Humour me…. That graceful sheer, little kick up aft, the rubbing strakes that set it off (get one of those wrong and it would spoil it); the curvaceous tops to the toe rail fwd (Mahara was the same) -almost a turtle deck effect. The cabin tops -just a little curve in them fore and aft. Look at the curved edges to the tops of the fwd wheelhouse screens. A lesser designer would have had them angular and would have put three in. He might have put an eyebrow atop them and again detracted from it. Admire the treatment of the alternate windows/portholes aft -all four had that. It is mimicked up fwd too. Yep, everything just right. The flying bridge -a later add on is not bad -works OK because she is a big boat.
    I surmise that Shipbuilders still had the men that were there during WW2 doing Fairmiles and the like -the knowledge capital/ expertise. Tim had trained by correspondence from the USA, I heard once. Anyone got anything else on his history?
    Oh, say again. Well done (doing?) Hylton!

    Like

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