Aloha


Aloha
photo ex Angus Rogers

The above photo of Aloha was taken in Bostaque Bay. Aloha was built by Dick Lang at St Mary’s Bay c1928  see below

What more do we know about her?

Harold Kidd Update

ALOHA was built at St Mary’s Bay in 1926 by Charles Robinson, not Dick Lang. Robinson had been building at Ohinemutu, Rotorua for many years from about 1909, for a time with Percy McIntosh, who moved to Whangarei in 1911. Robinson carried on at Ohinemutu until the 1930s. He built the keel yacht MAHOE at Ponsonby in November 1894. He worked with James Clare for some years and went to Tonga with him after building MAHOE. A most neglected builder (and a very fine one).

11-12-2015 Update ex Bert Boswell

The Aloha was bought from the Wilkinson family in 1965 or 66 by Tom Wood. Tom had crewed on the Aloha as a youngster and had been told he would have first choice if she ever went on the market. He was given the choice years later when Mr Wilkinson died. When Tom bought her she was powered by a power kerosene motor which had to be started by filling priming cups with petrol. I think the motor was a Commodore. Tom changed the motor for a diesel which was still in her when he eventually sold her. He used to tell the story of how as a young crew member he and his mates would swap from kerosene to petrol when they were racing in a regatta in the Whangarei Harbour – much to the skipper’s annoyance as he thought petrol was too expensive!
Tom was a bachelor and my  late wife’s, cousin. For many years he took me and my family of three  youngsters and one or the other of their cousins cruising every Christmas. We cruised from Whangaroa to The Barrier for many wonderful cruises. She was a large part of my young family’s life after my wife died shortly after Tom bought her. What wonderful experiences for my kids who grew up with a love of the sea. Most years we cruised in company with  Aumoe owned by Selwyn Wilkinson. The two boats ofter made a great sight cruising together or rafted up together for the night. Tom lavished a huge amount of care on the old girl and I was sad to see her a few years after Tom died looking sad and bedraggled  as some sort of fishing smack. However I saw her again some time later moored in the Whangarei Town Basin looking her old smart self. She was renowned for her long saloon table but I understand it was removed at some stage. That’s a pity.
The boat shed shed she lived in still remains as one of a group of three at the entrance to the Town Basin, The Aumoe’s shed was next door and also remains. They are all that is left of historic buildings at the Basin.
I am so thrilled to see someone is recording the histories of these lovely old ladies of the sea. I have a few photos of her if you are interested. The photo of the Aumoe alongside the Tiri was taken from Aloha. We called on the Tiri on our way back from the Barrier and were
invited on board. I remember the radio crew played a request for us after we left them – and a crate of beer, for which they were very grateful!
Bert Boswell

16 thoughts on “Aloha

  1. The Aloha was bought from the Wilkinson family in 1965 or 66 by Tom Wood. Tom had crewed on the Aloha as a youngster and had been told he would have first choice if she ever went on the market. He was given the choice years later when Mr Wilkinson died. When Tom bought her she was powered by a power kerosene motor which had to be started by filling priming cups with petrol. I think the motor was a Commodore. Tom changed the motor for a diesel which was still in her when he eventually sold her. He used to tell the story of how as a young crew member he and his mates would swap from kerosene to petrol when they were racing in a regatta in the Whangarei Harbour – much to the skipper’s annoyance as he thought petrol was too expensive!
    Tom was a bachelor and my late wife’s, cousin. For many years he took me and my family of three youngsters and one or the other of their cousins cruising every Christmas. We cruised from Whangaroa to The Barrier for many wonderful cruises. She was a large part of my young family’s life after my wife died shortly after Tom bought her. What wonderful experiences for my kids who grew up with a love of the sea. Most years we cruised in company with Aumoe owned by Selwyn Wilkinson. The two boats ofter made a great sight cruising together or rafted up together for the night. Tom lavished a huge amount of care on the old girl and I was sad to see her a few years after Tom died looking sad and bedraggled as some sort of fishing smack. However I saw her again some time later moored in the Whangarei Town Basin looking her old smart self. She was renowned for her long saloon table but I understand it was removed at some stage. That’s a pity.
    The boat shed shed she lived in still remains as one of a group of three at the entrance to the Town Basin, The Aumoe’s shed was next door and also remains. They are all that is left of historic buildings at the Basin.
    I am so thrilled to see someone is recording the histories of these lovely old ladies of the sea. I have a few photos of her if you are interested. The photo of the Aumoe alongside the Tiri was taken from Aloha. We called on the Tiri on our way back from the Barrier and were
    invited on board. I remember the radio crew played a request for us after we left them – and a crate of beer, for which they were very grateful!
    Bert Boswell

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  2. Pam, there’s rot and corruption in the tramtop which Marco didn’t have time to get to, but we’ve left until the winter refit.

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  3. Had noticed that.
    I’m just doing some repairs to the timber work around Laughing Lady’s windows.( Luder 32ft Commuter)
    She has three slideing windows ( Perspex- the latest thing then) each side.
    On close inspection of an old photo James was able to make out some lugs we feel would have been used to locate shutters on the exterior of the cabin side. Now how tricky shall that be to seal. I would imagine she shall give a good ride and with the flared bow the sea shall be redirected.

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  4. PS At least we now have the opportunity to use our mahogany-cased HMV record player (c.1925) for which I’ve just imported a rebuilt clockwork drive. Have 14,000 78 rpm jazz and blues records, so won’t be short of music.
    Working now on a crystal set. Anyone out there with a good cat’s whisker?

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  5. Tell me about it.
    We just didn’t get to Romance II’s clerestory windows over the winter, but left them until this winter. Result, when we got hammered off Tiri, taking it green to the cockpit in the big residual swell on the way to the CYA picnic the other weekend, a large amount of seawater got through the tramtop seams and window edges and took out some of our non-essential electrics (CD player, FM radio) and saturated our squabs.
    Hooray, more post-1919 stuff to ditch.

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  6. That’s quite typical of Dick Lang, and of Sam Ford, who inherited Dick’s moulds and style when he bought his business…..sort of “St. Mary’s Bay style” if you exclude Collings & Bell.

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  7. PS Do you want her full history? It’s a bit convoluted and involves a long sojourn in Whangarei with the Wilkinsons, NAPS service etc. She is usually attributed to either Dick Lang or Sam Ford basically, I suppose, that she was built in St. Mary’s Bay at a time when they were building there too, and who had heard of Charles Robinson??
    Her present owner is John Tattersfield, who is sitting about 20 feet from me as I write this.

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  8. ALOHA was built at St Mary’s Bay in 1926 by Charles Robinson, not Dick Lang. Robinson had been building at Ohinemutu, Rotorua for many years from about 1909, for a time with Percy McIntosh, who moved to Whangarei in 1911. Robinson carried on at Ohinemutu until the 1930s. He built the keel yacht MAHOE at Ponsonby in November 1994. He worked with James Clare for some years and went to Tonga with him after building MAHOE. A most neglected builder (and a very fine one).

    Like

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