Rangi B16

B16

RANGI B16

I have recently been contacted by Andrew Mason who while going thru a collection of old photos, came across the one above by H Winkelmann, sporting the sail number B16. Andrew was asking if anyone knew if she was still around and if so, what became of her.

I was able to point Andrew in the direction of a comment by Harold Kidd from back in April 2015 where HDK commented on a story / photo ex Chris McMullen on a mystery ship (yacht) wreck.
HDK advised that B16 was the Bailey & Lowe keel yacht Rangi, which had broken up when she came ashore at Norfolk Island in 1951.
Anyone able to tell us more about Rangi prior to 1951?
Harold Kidd Input – She was built as the fishing boat or “schnapper boat” for line fishing by Bailey & Lowe in 1903 as SCHOPOLO for a Greek fisherman called Nicholas. She was very like if not a twin to the Bailey & Lowe fishing boat WHITE HEATHER built for J. Wheeler. Logan Bros’ VICTORY and FRANCES were the same sort of boats. Motor fishing launches made them uneconomical very shortly after and they were converted to most satisfactory yachts because of their extra beam.
SCHOPOLO was sold out of the fishing industry and became LORELEI in 1919, changed hands and was renamed RANGI around 1923.
She took part in the 1931, 1948 and 1951 TransTasman races but was lost at Norfolk Is on her return in 1951.
Input from Jim Lott – Rangi was owned for a number of years by Con Thode’s father. Con learned his early sailing on board and spoke often of his time on board, and his sadness when she was wrecked after his father sold her.

I have been away overseas on “Victoria” (another Auckland ‘woody’, since 2011 and am now back living in NZ.
Currently we won the Camelot “Mokoia” (Stewart) and also owned “Vectis” (Woolacott) in the 1970’s.

4 thoughts on “Rangi B16

  1. in rangi’s log about the faff rig mapu its owner bass stallard used to sail to Japan a lot on one of his trips home he got hit with a storm mapu rolled and the mast let go and one of the mast stays punched a hole in the hull, bass became over cumb with battery fumes and got burnt lungs, bass hand pumped but to no avail, look was on basses side he heard someone calling it was a retired military officer sailing to New Zealand,he picked up bass, he was taken to hospital and treated but had to return on a regular bases to clear his lungs of fluid, bass was homeless and no money,as my boat was just tied up to the wharf in the town basin i offered bass the chance to stay on her free, he accepted and to my surprise kept it emaculate and also well maintained he did not have too but said he was a boat man and needed to do something. that is the story of another fine kauri boat gone to the sea grave,.

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  2. I owned RANGI a woolacot ketch 42 feet i berthed her at whangarae she was the last boat built of kauri at freemans bay rangi and a gaff rig boat mapu owned by bas stallard. i have some where in her log book photo’s of her being sailed around tied to the side of a tug to a yard. the lead keel was sitting on the slip and as the tide came in it was sailed on the top an then they waited for the tide to go down and it sat on top. also in the log book was an article of a rangi on rocks at norfolk island, if i recall there was something about a mark anthony in volved with it,harold531 mite know some more.

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  3. She was built as the fishing boat or “schnapper boat” for line fishing by Bailey & Lowe in 1903 as SCHOPOLO for a Greek fisherman called Nicholas. She was very like if not a twin to the Bailey & Lowe fishing boat WHITE HEATHER built for J. Wheeler. Logan Bros’ VICTORY and FRANCES were the same sort of boats. Motor fishing launches made them uneconomical very shortly after and they were converted to most satisfactory yachts because of their extra beam.
    SCHOPOLO was sold out of the fishing industry and became LORELEI in 1919, changed hands and was renamed RANGI around 1923.
    She took part in the 1931, 1948 and 1951 TransTasman races but was lost at Norfolk Is on her return in 1951.

    Like

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