Manukau Racing – Sailing Sunday

Manukau Racing – Sailing Sunday
photos ex Manukau Yacht & Motor Boat Club ex Nathan Herbert

Today’s post shows the start of the Champion/s Cup run by the Manukau Cruising Club in 1929. The bigger yacht in the center of the fleet is A27, photo below.
This post was done via the iphone from Patio Bay on board Raindance, make sure you check in tomorrow for lots of photos from the CYA weekend 😉

Harold Kidd Input

A27 is ANAHERA, built by Robert Logan Sr in August 1893 for D.S. Sutherland of Onehunga as a centreboard cutter. She was a 38 footer, rated at 3.5 tons and by far the biggest yacht on the Manukau.  She was taken over to the Waitemata in late 1919 and eventually registered with the APYMBA as a C Class, C22. She went back to the Manukau in 1924 when bought by the Hammond brothers.A27 is her Manukau number, the “A” her Manukau Cruising Club number and the “27” her Manukau Yacht & Motor Boat Club number.
Back on the Waitemata, in May 1936 she was completely gutted by fire while hauled out on the Tamaki River below the Panmure Bridge.
She is also third from left in the top pic.
The patiki on the extreme left of the top pic is MYRA, (sail number W), built by Logan Bros in August 1898 for Roy Wilson. She was on the Manukau between 1919 and 1930. She appears to have died in Northcote around 1939, but Robin may have more details.
The next boat to the right is one of the several mullet boats on the Manukau in 1929. I can’t read her number or tell her by the cut of her jib but she’s possibly the 22 footer MAIDIE. The rest to leeward are a mix of mulletties mainly, although the Logan patiki AOMA is probably in there.

6 thoughts on “Manukau Racing – Sailing Sunday

  1. I remember Arthur Sames well. One woodwork project was a wooden Skimmer with a large sail plan. The keel was moveable through a centre slot. they sailed really well.
    I spent a lot of time in the woodwork room during my years at AGS
    Brother Don and a a few mates built a frostbite under the hall next to the woodwork room.
    Arthur Sames was also Master in charge of Yachting and each year he would take a group of us over to the Wakatere Boating Club for trials to get the best team to represent AGS at the inter schools champs held in Frostbites.
    AGS did not have Woodwork as a school cert subject but in the fourth form a small group of us
    asked Mr Sames if he could change this, he was very keen and put a proposal to the principal,Henry Cooper, but no luck .However I spent two years teaching at AGS and reintroduced model yachts and also had many pupils pass School Cert in Woodwork and Technical Drawing.
    I remember Arthur Sames as a fine person and a great teacher

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  2. Robin re Arthur Sames
    Thank you for filling in the gaps on Arthur Sames, Wayne Fleet was in my class. I knew Arthur had been a pilot in the war but now you have provided us with his exploits. Wow ! I hope some one from Auckland Grammar days can add some more.

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  3. Just poking about in some dark corners.
    Arthur Sames joined the air force in 1940 and following training joined with 486 (NZ) Squadron, and flew Hurricane night fighters (shot down a Fock-Wulf 190 – no mean feat in a Hurricane – and was credited with the shared destruction of another) before transferring Typhoons and Tempests engaged on ground attack duties. He was awarded the DFC in 1944 and shot down two V-1’s.

    In May 1945 it was reported that Flying Officer Arthur Norman Sames RNZAF DFC was acquitted at a general court-martial at Ardmore of low flying and performing aerobatics over Taumarunui on March 23.

    Sounds like a very likeable bloke.

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  4. A really interesting family. Here’s what I can provide on their boats… those that I know of. Hopefully this may give some reference points and jog some memories

    1933 Perseus Y-8
    Registered to owner T.W. Sames. Raced on the Manukau until 1938, then ended up in Hamilton around 1940.
    1938 Satanita V-38
    Registered to and built by the Sames Brothers. Raced with both Manukau clubs for a season, then possibly laid up. Appears in Otahuhu after WW2 owned by R.C. Blackburn, who still owned her as late as 1974 when he entered her in the Anniversary Regatta. By then a ballasted cruiser
    1939 Aquila V-38
    Registered to and built by the Sames Brothers. Probably used the rig and gear off Satanita. They sold her in 1942 and by 1944 she was owned by Brian O’Donohue in Whangarei, later well known for his ocean going yachts Tarua, Aotea and others during the 1960’s and 70’s.

    A very BIG Gap here until we pick up the Cat Pampero in 1960. I remember they used to bring Pampero across for the Auckland 18-foot Flying Squadron, Cock o’ the Harbour races.
    There were at least 4 Pampero’s, the last one Pampero IV in 1976 was a Tornado. Pampero III may well have been a Tornado as well.

    Arthur Sames also built and designed cats for other people but the best known were the three Kitty class cats for Wayne and Noel Fleet. All three cats won championships of various sorts
    1960 Fleet Cat Cat-51
    1964 Fleet Cat II Cat-134
    1966? Fleet Cat III Cat 142

    I also have a record of W. Sames building a 40-foot multihull named Flying Cloud for B.A. Zanderigo which was later renamed Blind Faith

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  5. This entry is about sailing on the Manukau Harbour and my friend. The late Arthur Sames.
    At Auckland Grammar School we had a Wood Work Master Arthur Sames.
    Woodwork was a hobby subject at A.G. but Mr Sames was an interesting man to those of us who were keen on sailing.
    He was a member of the Manukau Yacht club and later (for years) I often saw him at boat shows representing the club.
    At the school he had a mould and as a project the boys could make a fibre glass sailing model of a scow type racing yacht. Rather like the flying 18’ “Komutu”but with a keel. This model making had stopped by the time I was in his class (I guess it was not considered woodwork) but, I ended up with one.
    Sames was way ahead of his time. There were no fibre glass boats in NZ, it was a very new material in the late 1950’s.
    He also had a Catamaran called “Pamparo” He entered the same in the Auckland Anniversary Regatta every year. There were no other multi hulls on the Harbour. I remember lending him a spinnaker off our Eighteen “BonVoyage” He needed it as there was a light weather forecast for the Monday. We went and picked it up at Okahu Bay one Friday lunch hour. Imagine if that happening in our PC world today!
    A few years previous I hit a reef off “Kohimarama Beach” in my “Idle Along” and split the centerboard case. I told Mr Sames of my misfortune. He said “do you want some wood” We went into the basement under the school. There were lots of damaged Kauri Desks. Somehow, I got two desk tops home on my bike.
    By the boatsheds in Ngapui Road on the grass verge was a holed Francis Herreshoff designed Sea Kayak. It was there for years. I believe this had been built by Arthur Sames.
    From memory Arthur had some brothers who were keen sailors.
    Can anyone else (Ian McRobie) add to this history of the Sames Brothers Sailing History and correct me if I am wrong. Harold there seems to be no reference in Southern Breeze. I am sure a lot of ex Grammar pupils will remember Arthur. This history needs to be recorded. Where better than on Waitamata Woody’s.

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  6. A27 is ANAHERA, built by Robert Logan Sr in August 1893 for D.S. Sutherland of Onehunga as a centreboard cutter. She was a 38 footer, rated at 3.5 tons and by far the biggest yacht on the Manukau. She was taken over to the Waitemata in late 1919 and eventually registered with the APYMBA as a C Class, C22. She went back to the Manukau in 1924 when bought by the Hammond brothers.A27 is her Manukau number, the “A” her Manukau Cruising Club number and the “27” her Manukau Yacht & Motor Boat Club number.
    Back on the Waitemata, in May 1936 she was completely gutted by fire while hauled out on the Tamaki River below the Panmure Bridge.
    She is also third from left in the top pic.
    The patiki on the extreme left of the top pic is MYRA, (sail number W), built by Logan Bros in August 1898 for Roy Wilson. She was on the Manukau between 1919 and 1930. She appears to have died in Northcote around 1939, but Robin may have more details.
    The next boat to the right is one of the several mullet boats on the Manukau in 1929. I can’t read her number or tell her by the cut of her jib but she’s possibly the 22 footer MAIDIE. The rest to leeward are a mix of mulletties mainly, although the Logan patiki AOMA is probably in there.

    Like

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