Joan

JOAN

Now this is what classic boating is all about – nice boat & nice people enjoying themselves in the spring weather 🙂

Joan was designed / built in 1919 by Bailey & Lowe so should get a tick from Mr Kidd. Even though Joan is a CYA vessel, I do not know much about her, so if anyone can shed some light – please do.

Photo taken by Greg Fenwick off Onetangi, Waiheke Island.

Whats the bet there wasn’t x12 life jackets on-board 😦

16 thoughts on “Joan

  1. Pingback: JOAN + AUCKLAND ANNIVERSARY WEEKEND CLASSIC BOATING MUST DOs  | waitematawoodys.com #1 for classic wooden boat stories, info, advice & news – updated daily

  2. Pingback: Marion D > Joan | waitematawoodys.com #1 for classic wooden boat stories, info, advice & news

  3. In February this year, I had the very great pleasure to spend a few days and nights on this beautiful icon, as the guest of my brother Ray and his better half Jill. Our family of five cruised down to what I googled to be Chamberlains Bay on Ponui island and the weather and conditions were perfect. The sense of space and very sturdy construction in every aspect of her, leaves no doubt in your mind that this vessel has, could, and would be able to go anywhere asked of her.
    From the moment you step on board, you smile, happy that the immediately foreseeable future
    will be full of fun, fishing and good company. And yes, that motor could drag a train up Everest,
    and not miss a single beat, and yes, you can be sure all the safety gear is there, plus some.
    There are only tinnies here in Wagga N.S.W., so you can be sure I keep checking the mailbox for another invitation to checkout “Joan” and her surroundings. Cheers ..Kevin Russell

    Like

  4. Another PS; Casey had a timber mill in Beaumont Street which burnt down in January 1928. He had a second IMANOTA built by Collings & Bell in 1927.

    Like

  5. Just researched this data on the engine;
    6L2
    6 cylinders – 8240 c.c. – 41/4 diameter X 6inch stroke – 60hp @ 1000rpm – 1.39 tons. – Water cooled — Would make a wonderful mooring, but a huge waste of perfection

    Like

  6. Is that Gardner a “612” or a “6L2” can’t find any reference to a “612,” — perhaps someone can clarify for me, & tell me where to look for its specs. — Would love to know more about it. KEN RICKETTS

    Like

  7. Lovely picture of the boat and all those on board. Just a point regards the safety, the 13 of us each had a life jacket on board along with multiple other safety measures. Captain is a bit of a stickler like that! And agree, it was a beautiful day to be out classic boating.

    Like

  8. PS Another myth was that she was built for the Colonial Ammunition Company. I can find no connection between Casey and CAC which was.of course, run by the Whitneys of GREY WITCH etc fame.

    Like

  9. She has always ticked so many boxes. Love her. BTW I looked up the Miller Engine Co in Grayson’s Americal Marine Engines at P 161. They offered twin cylinders from 6 – 25 hp and four cyl 18 – 50 hp. Could rev as high as 500 rpm so would have been a gorgeous engine to burble along with and a shame to shut off after a trip. Guess she became a mooring weight. If anyone finds it or a similar, lemme know! I still have memories of Tasman’s Sterling…..

    Like

  10. JOAN was built by Bailey & Lowe in December 1918 as IMANOTA for William Lang Casey of Hamilton Road, Herne Bay, the then President of the Victoria Cruising Club. She was 42ft x 11ft and was fitted with a Millar engine. Casey sold her to James Donald in early 1922 and he renamed her MARION D, although the name didn’t stick very well and she was often referred to as IMANOTA for years afterwards. During the winter of 1922 Donald repowered her with a 30hp (rated) 3 cylinder Twigg and had the dodger built on. Donald owned her until just before WW2 when Athol Umfrey Wells of King Street, Panmure bought her and renamed her JOAN, probably after a daughter because his wife was Gladys. During WW2 she was with NAPS as Z19 under Wells’ command and the Twigg was replaced by a Gardner in 1944. Athol Wells owned her for many years, I think until he died in 1975.
    A chap called Walker owned her in the mid eighties when her provenance had transmogrified into her being built by Chas. Bailey in 1914 and being used by Zane Grey for game-fishing, all myths.

    Like

  11. Joan was owned for a number of years around 1965 and later by a Mr Cook(e)?,he had an engineering and die casting establishment in Mt Wellington. He kept her moored off his home at Bucklands Beach.She always was kept looking smart and had a very quite,slow running engine which just gave you the sense of power. For all her beam she could certainly roll, putting her beltings under while fishing in the Crusoe Passage.

    Like

  12. Not a 6lw. She has a 6l2, one of only 3 that are still running in nz. Very beamy for her age and also no slow coach. Ray Russel keeps her imaculate at waipuna boat club piles in tamaki river. (Many fine vessels reside in the tamaki river, nicely tucked away from the “show pony brigade”). Happy sanding and varnishing. Cameron.

    Like

  13. She was owned for many years by Athol Wells, who as I recall was a director of Firestone Tyres, & had huge property on the waters edge of the Tamaki River also for a great many years, (from the 1930s I believe), right alongside the Panmure Yacht Club, on the Corner of Kings & Riverview Rds., & she used to moor at his wharf at the bottom of his garden. I passed right by her a great many times as I went up & down the river in our family’s various boats most of my life, (between about 1950 & 1980) & he kept her beautifully, & used her to get to his Waiheke property mostly. She had, & almost certainly still has, a 6LW Gardner Diesel. Harold is certain to be able to fill in her provenance. — KEN RICKETTS

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s