Rata

RATA

The launch Rata recently made an appearance on Lew Redwoods fb, a WW search comes up with several craft of the same name but not this woody. The location looks ’southern’ to my eyes.

Can we expand of her past and current location?

19-10-2022 Input ex Ray Morey – After Whangarei Towboats folded up, (Jack Fisher, Kay Fisher and Ivan Rolfe) Ivan bought Rata from a ship broker in Auckland where she was lying. We brought her up to Whangarei where we put a heavy panting beam across behind the engine and mounted a towpost bridge behind the wheelhouse, after the style of the Alert, where the load was transfered to the deck, not the cabins.She had a 4-71 with 2:1 red box so swung a decent prop.I spent a lot of time towing one of the W.H.B. bottom dump suction dredge barges, mostly “Rua” with her mainly on the main channel before Westminster came in and deepened the place. We also did provisioning of the oil tankers at Marsden Point and bunkering oils for the ships. I knew she had come from the sounds area origionally. When “A.A. Tankcleaning” sold her I believe she went “up to the islands” as a village supply boat but was lost soon after. I was driving her about 1964-65.

Photo Below – by again ex Ray Morey of Rata off Onerahi about 1965 when owned by Ivan Rolfe.

Something From Left Field 

Like most classic woody boating enthusiasts I’m not a fan of jet skis / personal water craft etc – they have a habit of shattering the peace and quiet in a bay. The ones used for fishing are all good. The one below is almost starting to look ok, lose the white on white paint scheme and it would be very cool.

6 thoughts on “Rata

  1. Pingback: Rata Revisted | waitematawoodys.com #1 for classic wooden boat stories, info, advice & news – updated daily

  2. After Whangarei Towboats folded up, (Jack Fisher, Kay Fisher and Ivan Rolfe) Ivan bought Rata from a ship broker in Auckland where she was lying. We brought her up to Whangarei where we put a heavy panting beam across behind the engine and mounted a towpost bridge behind the wheelhouse, after the style of the Alert, where the load was transfered to the deck, not the cabins.She had a 4-71 with 2:1 red box so swung a decent prop.I spent a lot of time towing one of the W.H.B. bottom dump suction dredge barges, mostly “Rua” with her mainly on the main channel before Westminster came in and deepened the place. We also did provisioning of the oil tankers at Marsden Point and bunkering oils for the ships. I knew she had come from the sounds area origionally. When “A.A. Tankcleaning” sold her I believe she went “up to the islands” as a village supply boat but was lost soon after. I was driving her about 1964-65.

    Like

  3. Re O. E. V. Rata, According to a Déclaration for a river motor ship certificate dated 31st December 1934.First survey.
    Owner E A Johnson Havelock.
    Surveyed for 22 passengers Havelock to French Pass.
    46 passengers in Pelorus.
    H P 35. Length 37.5 beam11. 25.Draft 4.5. length may be registered length. For side of the stem to for side of rudder stock. Gross Tunnage 11.5 net 4 85.
    12month fee 1pound 10 shillings.
    Unfortunately there is no other relevant information on the certificate.
    Its signed by surveyor of ships S N Johnston

    Like

  4. Éric Johnson had a mail boat called Rata based in Havelock.
    It was sold about 1958 and shipped to New Caledonia eventually where it was wrecked.
    The wheel house is larger than I recall but the Hull looks like the Rata.
    Original engine was a Vivian 52 h p at 800 rpm. It shook like hell, never had to stir the sugar in your tea. Later 3 71 G m.
    David Jones

    Like

  5. From the book by The Johnson Family of Havelock “A Century of Service”, Rata was built of white pine in the 1930s by Eric and his brother Frank Johnson in Havelock.
    Photo more than likely taken in the Marlborough Sounds.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s