Looking for Jaguar

LOOKING FOR JAGUAR
photos* & details ex Ken Ricketts, edited by Alan H.
(*photos of Jaguar are ex 8mm movie film so very poor quality)

Some History
Jaguar is a very rare craft having started life as a flying boat tender. She is one of 87 built of this base specification by the British Powerboat Co., in Hythe, Southhampton, U.k. in the 1930 >1940’s period. These craft were used around the world both in military & civilian service.
They were designed by Hubert Scott-Paine who owned the British Powerboat Co. The actual architect involved in the project was a George Selman. They were powered by various types & brands of paired engines overseas, but all the U.K. craft had S6 Perkin engines (refer spec sheet above)
In New Zealand the craft were used by the air force for their flying boat fleet during & after WWII & Tasman Empire Airways Ltd (T.E.A.L.). TEAL used them out of Mechanics Bay, for flying boat patrol.  All these boats were made of mahogany, with double diagonal planking on the bottom & single diagonal planking on the sides. There were at least 3 boats in the TEAL fleet, one of which had, 2 x Ford V8 engines, one had 2 x Meadows 6 cyl., petrol engines & another with 2 x 4-53 GM Detroits (this one was to become Jaguar, in civilian life).
During the 1950’s the TEAL fleet was under the control of a Mr Arch Tucket, (owner of the 30 foot launch Otazel, photo below). Ken Ricketts family knew Arch Tucket & Ken went out on patrol on the boats a few times.
The boats were sold when TEAL moved operations to Mangere & focused on land based planes.

 Pleasure Use
One of the craft was given the name Jaguar & bought by a Mr Hansen, of The Parade, Bucklands Beach.
Hansen hardly used her personally, but she was in the care of & used extensively, by the a very fine gentleman, the late Jim Ellis, & his family, also of Bucklands Beach, a highly skilled specialist watchmaker, from the mid 1960s well in to the 1970s. She was moored at Bucklands Beach for many years on a swing mooring during this period. The Ricketts were friends with Jim Ellis & they cruised together often, in their launch Flying Scud.

So the question of the day is where is Jaguar today & what became of her two sister ships?

Harold Kidd Update

There appears to be a degree of over-simplification in Ken’s article between the TEAL launches and the RNZAF launches built to the Scott-Paine/ British Power Boats’ 40ft Seaplane Tender design. TEAL’s sole example was built in the UK by British Power Boats. She had twin Meadows engines.
The 3 RNZAF versions were built by W.G. Lowe & Son Ltd in Auckland and were launched in October 1942. They were W44, W45 and W46, powered with twin 6 cylinder 110hp Graymarine diesels, both RH rotation.
W44 went to CAB at Mechanics Bay but went back to RNZAF service in 1955.
A fourth RNZAF version, W88, was built by W.G. Lowe & Son Ltd in July 1943 and is now restored and on display at the RNZAF Museum, Wigram.
The TEAL UK-built boat was taken over by the RNZAF as W6.
A fifth Scott-Paine 40 footer was acquired by the RNZAF about 1952 and given the number W322. In his well-researched article on the subject in the AHSNZ Journal of August 1995,D.J. Duxbury states, “It is thought that this boat originated with the RAF in Singapore, and it appears to be identical to the New Zealand-built control launches.”
If JAGUAR is built of mahogany then she would seem to be either W6 or W322.

A news clipping below ex Harold Kidd from Papers Past – New Zealand Herald – 4 September 1942. click to enlarge

PP

01-07-2018 Update from John Bullivant – photo below shows Jaguar hauled out c.1975, at Bucklands Beach Yacht Club, her mooring in those days was 80m (on the left) from the haul out ramp.

JAGUAR 70S

15 thoughts on “Looking for Jaguar

  1. Hi.I am the current owner of this vessel “JAGUAR” and purchased it from Hamilton through trademe i am slowly working on her she resides in my factory. As to her history I have the original build plate and she was built in Hythe Southampton by The British Power Boat Co, serial#1226-438 type A.T.M. built 1940 37’6″ , Dr V.D.M Jacobson of Havelock purchased her from Southampton in 1955 (Hull id KP412) she arrived in Wellington as deck cargo aboard the Port Fairy, the doctor used as a means to visit his patents in the sounds, it was around this time that the Meadows engines were replaced with Detroit 4-53 paired, I also would be very interested to learn more of her service history in England during the war and also its past life here , i have a few photos and news clippings. I have purchased two more Detroits 4-53 paired in very good condition, At this point i have removed all of the woven rovinigs that had been applied to the deck, cabin tops and coamings and surprisingly very little repair required at some stage of her life the belting had been replaced with Kauri This is were most of the rot has been ,The spruce tongue and grove cabin top was in a state and has been binned , i am replacing some of the deck beams all of the solid work that i am replacing is being done in Mahogany, The skinning the deck and coamings is being done in gaboon 6mm. My intention is to restore her back to an original state. Cheers

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  2. Just to muddy the waters here a trifle, the RNZAF 40ft crash tender W6 was in Fiji in 1944 and was stated to have been built by British Power Boat Co of Hythe, and been equipped with twin British Power-marinised Meadows engines. She was returned to Auckland on 10/5/1944.
    In 1961 she was bought by the NZ Coastguard Service and renamed NIMBUS II. There may be some confusion with he 35 footer NIMBUS I which was the former Captain’s barge off HMS LEANDER, later at PHILOMEL, built by Vospers and generally called “The Green Parrot”.
    Anyway NIMBUS II was apparently sold to Whakatane around 1964.
    I reckon she was one of the ex-TEAL boats.

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  3. I bought one of the 40ft Launches from an agent in Tutakaka in Dec 2013. I have it moored at the Kaipara Cruising Club. I would like to know which one it is W44, W45 or W46? and would be very pleased to get some history.

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  4. The vaguely similar 24 footers (built by W.G. Lowe & Son Ltd and Lane Motor Boat Co) had all sorts of engines originally including Redwing Hesselman, Redwing Thorobred, Chrysler, Gray and Perkins, whatever they could dredge up in wartime conditions.

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  5. As you will see above. I never said the 3 T.E.A.L. boats were al the Jaguar spec, in fact my recall is that the one with the Ford V8s was probably a slightly smaller boat & may well have either been a smaller Scott-Paine, or anther similar design, — they were all fairly similar In their overall concept. Also with reference to the boat that was inspected for Coastguard, I can confirm that JAGUARS engines were in boxes each side of the boat going to the outside edge to inner side of the hull with a walkway through the middle, & immediately aft of where the cabin top ended. — KEN RICKETTS

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  6. Um, nobody said they were Detroit 6-110 engines, just that they were 6 cylinder 110hp engines, a very conservative rating in the state of tune as used by USN landing craft etc during WW2.

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  7. Have just done some research on the Detroit 6-110 engines & this in Wikipedia would seem to me to indicate that the 6-110 engines were introduced to the marine world in 1951 long after the JAGUAR group of boats went in to service — herewith a direct quote —

    ” Quoting from an introductory ad (Yachting Magazine, January 1951):
    “Here’s the newest member of the General Motors Diesel family – the brawny 6-110 engine that develops 275 horsepower. It is 50% more powerful than the famous 6-cylinder GM “71” engine that powers so many of America’s fine yachts, tugs and fishing vessels — yet it weighs less than 15 pounds per horsepower, including the famous GM hydraulic reverse gear.” —

    I’m confused — KEN RICKETTS

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  8. There was one in the Sounds in the 60s, converted for pleasure use and owned by a Dr. Brasted. I’ve no idea if she was ex-RNZAF or ex-TEAL, and can’t remember what she was called then.

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  9. As Cameron said this boat was sold on TM, I think about three years ago. She had been out of the water for about a year at the time for some specific mechanical repair, and the long-time owner had either fallen ill or passed away, hence a very low reserve auction. She looked to be in very original shape, original superstructure and very basic interior, which was also probably not “improved” much over the decades. I got the impression that aside from the mechanical issue she could have gone straight back in the water. The unfortunate thing with low reserve auctions (I think she went for less than $10K in the end) is that they attract a few dreamers, so it’s possible this WWII time capsule is mouldering away in someones backyard. I hope I’m wrong, though.

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  10. I have seen & heard JAGUARS engines many times back in the 60s 70s & there is no doubt that their sound could only have come from Detroits, (or Graymarine Diesels of course), however I know that they were identical engines to RESOLUTE, which had 2 x 4-53 Detroits only fairly recently removed at West Harbour, which a saw in the actual lifting out process of removal, by chance, when I was there one day, – (see post I wrote some time back on RESOLUTE), as Ray B & Jim E, & yours truly, were very close friends at that time, & we all met & talked of the identical engines of the 2 boats in the course of conversations, regularly, in that period, there is no doubt as to the specs of her engines. — KEN RICKETTS

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  11. I went to see this or a similar boat at Bucklands Beach with a with an old school friend whose father was Capt Holloway the leading light in the fledgling coastguard. They were looking for a suitable boat for their work. We went out for a run in her and I seem to recall she had two six cylinder engines down aft in engine boxes. The owner only could get one going which caused him some dismay as he saw the sale going out the window. I am pretty sure they weren’t GMs (I’d have heard) and seem to recall dismissing them as P6 Perkins which were renowned for snapping cranks. I am sure they weren’t Fords.

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  12. There appears to be a degree of over-simplification in Ken’s article between the TEAL launches and the RNZAF launches built to the Scott-Paine/ British Power Boats’ 40ft Seaplane Tender design. TEAL’s sole example was built in the UK by British Power Boats. She had twin Meadows engines.
    The 3 RNZAF versions were built by W.G. Lowe & Son Ltd in Auckland and were launched in October 1942. They were W44, W45 and W46, powered with twin 6 cylinder 110hp Graymarine diesels, both RH rotation.
    W44 went to CAB at Mechanics Bay but went back to RNZAF service in 1955.
    A fourth RNZAF version, W88, was built by W.G. Lowe & Son Ltd in July 1943 and is now restored and on display at the RNZAF Museum, Wigram.
    The TEAL UK-built boat was taken over by the RNZAF as W6.
    A fifth Scott-Paine 40 footer was acquired by the RNZAF about 1952 and given the number W322. In his well-researched article on the subject in the AHSNZ Journal of August 1995,D.J. Duxbury states, “It is thought that this boat originated with the RAF in Singapore, and it appears to be identical to the New Zealand-built control launches.”
    If JAGUAR is built of mahogany then she would seem to be either W6 or W322.

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  13. Hi. Am pretty sure she was offered for sale on trademe few years ago. Was in a trucking yard down Hamilton way. Still had Detroits installed. Cheers.

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