Ranginui


RANGINUI

photos & details from Harold Kidd

The photos above of the bridge-decker RANGINUI, a good-looking craft.

All Harold knows about her is that she was owned in 1952-3 by H D Hall, in 1973 by L A Boswell who sold her to Keith and Betty Bankart.

Does anyone know more about her, particularly who built her and where she is now?

Update from Ken Rickets –  RANGINUI was built for the Halls, who were building contractors, in the late 1930s or early 40s & as you can see in the 2 pics, she was lengthened in the later 40s & am almost certain the addition was done by Roy Lidgard -but it may possibly have been Shipbuilders – the Halls had her for many years & she was a regular at Kawau at Christmas. The tuck had a special shape as I recall — looked a lillte bit long &narrow after being lengthened I thought.

Harold Kidd Update

Betty Bankart thinks she was built in 1947 by Chas. Bailey & Sons Ltd, which seems plausible.

07-01-2016 Photo ex Peter Croft of Ranginui at Ponui

Ranginui

08-05-2017 Update – Peter Croft the owner of Ranginui was working on her & uncovered this ‘note’ written on the hull, in the loo (head). As Ranginui was launched in 1946 or 1947 it could have been written by one of the boatbuilders, or someone who didn’t rate one of the builders 🙂

Ranginui Message

6 thoughts on “Ranginui

  1. Pingback: Ranginui | waitematawoodys.com #1 for classic wooden boat stories, info, advice & news

  2. RANGINUI was built for the Halls, who were building contractors, in the late 1930s or early 40s, & as you can see in the 2 pics, she was lengthended in the later 40s & am almost certain the addition was done by Roy Lidgard -but it may possibly have been Shipbuilders – the Halls had her for many years & she was a regular at Kawau at Christmas.
    The tuck had a special shape as I recall — looked a lillte bit long & narrow after being lengthened I thought. — KEN RICKETTS

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  3. Caught my first snapper on Ranginui when Uncle ‘Matt’ (Boswell) took me out when I was about 6 years old. He used to follow the ‘gut’ boat out behind Rangitoto where most of the port’s rubbish was unceremoniously dumped each day.

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