Ozone & Rosemary

Continuing the game fishing link today – this time Ozone & Rosemary – more details below

photo ex classicgameboatnz

Harold Kidd Update

There were two OZONEs which makes matters confusing. The first was built by Collings & Bell in 1912. The second was built by Percy McIntosh in Whangarei in 1914 for Harold Vipond for the Auckland-Wade River trade but which Vipond took north to the Bay of Islands in 1925 or perhaps a tad earlier for game-fishing. 

ROSEMARY was built in St.Mary’s Bay by Leon Warne in December 1920 for himself and his brother George and was taken north for game-fishing out of Russell at about the same time as OZONE. The Warne brothers then set up boatbuilding, repairs as well as gameboat chartering at Russell. ROSEMARY originally had a Scripps 4 cylinder but was later fitted with a Redwing. There wasn’t much love lost between Chas. Collings and Leon Warne after Warne served his time with Collings and set up alongside him in 1916. Warne shared that opinion with Alf Bell who probably worked for Leon when he left the Walsh Brothers at Kohimarama; but Alf Bell didn’t build ROSEMARY. Perhaps there’s confusion because Warne’s foreman was Alf RAGG.

Both launches were very successful in promoting the deep sea angling sport in the Bay of Islands, both from Russell and Whangaroa. The boom in the sport was accelerated by Zane Grey’s involvement in the later 1920s but ground almost to a standstill in the Depression, picking up gain by 1937.

ROSEMARY was originally launched a a dashing flushdecker. See “N Z Vintage Launches” p92 for a pic of her at speed on the Waitemata in the 1925 Anniversary Regatta.

Cutting From Northern Advocate – 30 Dec 1920 ex Harold Kidd ex Papers Past

 

21 thoughts on “Ozone & Rosemary

  1. Pingback: Rosemary – Leon Warne | waitematawoodys.com #1 for classic wooden boat stories, info, advice & news – updated daily

  2. Whoops, final three are the same picture (somehow I stuffed up there) but it takes you to the site anyway.

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  3. Pingback: Rosemary | waitematawoodys.com

  4. Hi Guys
    I think some of the best pictures of Rosemary are actually on the website ‘classic launches’. There are some great shots there from the pre-war game fishing days and also some of the boat as I remember her in lighter colours from the 60’s and 70’s. I can post some shortcuts on Wednesday when back in the office. Rosemary had some rather well known people go out on her, George took out a few movie stars and other VIP’s over the years. I have one or two good pictures of Leon and George in the good old days that I can share. My grandfather who owned and operated the Rosemary for decades is buried in Longbeach cemetary in Russell. He has a leaping marlin etched into his headstone which lies under the only tree in the middle of the main lawn. Dad said they called George ‘Hori’ because he was so brown skinned from skippering the boat over many years, even in the pre-war b&w pictures you can see that he is very brown. He was a good man and a very cool grandfather who would sing when he had a few too many and played a nice banjo which my father still has. His real name was Graham Joseph Warne, George was actually his nickname.

    Steve Warne

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  5. Hi Harold,
    Yes you are correct Leon did build her. Would be good to follow up on her history.

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  6. Hi Mel
    Great news, thanks. I assumed the Rosemary had long been broken up or left to rot somewhere but the news that she is still out there is indeed fantastic. I will let my father know also as he has pondered the question several times. I must take a look at her when I am up that way sometime if that’s ok.

    Thanks again
    Steve Warne

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  7. I’ve sent Alan a link to a newspaper report verifying the above.

    Now viewable in the main body of the post
    AH

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  8. Mel, she’s your boat, so I guess you feel you can make up her history. But it was Leon Warne who built her NOT Collings & Bell. The two yards were 100ft apart and Leon served his time with Collings & Bell, that’s all.

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  9. HI Steve,i am pretty sure that i have the boat now.
    Built by Collings and Bell St Mary’s Bay
    origanal engine 30hp scripps petrol
    George Warne owned her
    Previous owners
    Sawl Short Tinopai had for about a year and sold 1971
    Harry Bell brought and used as commercial fishing boat sold 1986
    Wally Edwards Tinopai sold 4/10/86
    Neville Hall Dargaville brought 4/10/86
    Stafford Hill Dargaville brought ?/6/87
    Robin Cleaver Dargaville brought 1988
    Melvin Adams Kaitaia brought 2004 still own it.

    Ken Warne called into Mill Bay at Mangonui when she was on the hardstand, he
    recognised her, he did some history checking for me, sent me news paper clippings and photos.
    I have talked to all the above and they have the same story of her history.

    Mel Adams

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  10. George Warne was my Grandfather and owned the Rosemary right up into the 1970’s when he sold her to move down to Auckland after the death of his wife. He lived with us for several years and passed away in 1981.
    I remember as a young boy going to Russell to stay with George or ‘papa’ I should say, we would go down to Matauwhi Bay where Rosemary was moored and take her for a spin every now and then. I also remember visiting his brother Leon Warne in his retirement in St Marys Bay.
    I would be very interested to know where the real Rosemary is, we sometimes wonder where she ended up and have taken it for granted for some time that she no longer exists. Any news would be appreciated.

    Steve Warne

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  11. According to the new owner who’s had her for about 18 months, Rosemary is the same boat as in the photo. She’s spent all her working life as a fishing vessel of some kind, be it cray fishing, long lining or whatever. There is a book “Fighting Fish” (author unknown. Harold you will may be able to put some light on it) which mentions Rosemary and Ozone. She’s gone through life with two name changes and the latest owner, on purchasing Rosemary gave the original name back to her. She now sports a raised cabin which doesn’t really marry up with the vintage or appearance of the boat. Apparently Ozone is still around also and mobile but not sure where.

    Nathan, I asked the owner if he was related to you and the answer was no which means that the Rosemary your uncle owns up North isn’t from the Zane Grey “stable”.

    _____

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  12. ROSEMARY was originally launched a a dashing flushdecker. See “N Z Vintage Launches” p92 for a pic of her at speed on the Waitemata in the 1925 Anniversary Regatta.

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  13. There’s a Rosemary currently up on the hard next to Lees at the Sandspit. She’s used for charter fishing, social events etc. Wonder if it’s the same boat. Shall be heading up there tomorrow and will make a few enquiries.

    _____

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  14. There were two OZONEs which makes matters confusing. The first was built by Collings & Bell in 1912. The second was built by Percy McIntosh in Whangarei in 1914 for Harold Vipond for the Auckland-Wade River trade but which Vipond took north to the Bay of Islands in 1925 or perhaps a tad earlier for game-fishing.
    ROSEMARY was built in St.Mary’s Bay by Leon Warne in December 1920 for himself and his brother George and was taken north for game-fishing out of Russell at about the same time as OZONE. The Warne brothers then set up boatbuilding, repairs as well as gameboat chartering at Russell. ROSEMARY originally had a Scripps 4 cylinder but was later fitted with a Redwing. There wasn’t much love lost between Chas. Collings and Leon Warne after Warne served his time with Collings and set up alongside him in 1916. Warne shared that opinion with Alf Bell who probably worked for Leon when he left the Walsh Brothers at Kohimarama; but Alf Bell didn’t build ROSEMARY. Perhaps there’s confusion because Warne’s foreman was Alf RAGG.
    Both launches were very successful in promoting the deep sea angling sport in the Bay of Islands, both from Russell and Whangaroa. The boom in the sport was accelerated by Zane Grey’s involvement in the later 1920s but ground almost to a standstill in the Depression, picking up gain by 1937.

    Like

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