Aries


ARIES - 11.1.15 -2

ARIES

Today’s post features Aries, seen above off Gulf Harbour Marina back in Jan 2015. Photo ex Ken Ricketts, sorry the photo is a little blurry – KR has upgraded the camera since then:-)

Aries is a stranger to me – anyone able to shed some light on her provenance?

Input from Harold Kidd

Owen Woolley built her in 1957 for Max Burrett. Her original engines were twin ex-USN 6 cylinder Chrysler Crowns of 1943 vintage, later replaced, as Russell so accurately remembers, with twin Commer diesels when Ed Carter bought her c.1967. She was a Registered British Ship and in Lloyd’s Yacht Register so tracking her details is easy.

The Commers were flat 3 or 4 cylinder 2 stroke diesels originally developed by Tilling Stevens which Rootes Group bought out post-war, hence the type “TS”. Aren’t they inspired at least by Continental practice, Sulzer? Hispano-Suiza?
One of my uncles (ex-Ray Vincent) ran TS3 Commers and swore by them for power and economy. I always liked the tearing calico sound they produced.

 

8 thoughts on “Aries

  1. Pingback: Aries | waitematawoodys.com #1 for classic wooden boat stories, info, advice & news

  2. The TS3 Commer was quite different from the traditional “flat” engine (VW Bettle/Subaru/Incoming etc) configuration. It was an “opposed piston” design where there were 2 pistols sharing a common cylinder, piston crowns facing inwards. Hence 3 cylinders for 6 pistons and no cylinder head. The Commer`s cylinders lay horizontally and transversally over the crankshaft. Power was transmitted from the condors via a bell crank type mechanism to the crank. Interesting concept but never really caught on, altho of late there is an engine under development following similar principles

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  3. Hi Harold had twin TS3s in Acheron a Owen Woolley launch went for 8 years and not one problem with them they were quiet and very smooth.

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  4. Harold, there were only about 8 of the T.S.4 engines made and only one escaped the meltdown and it is at Nelson in a truck. The other continental builder of the o.p.truck engine was TATRA from Checoslovakia

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  5. PS Those Commers which Russell considers don’t look like engines were flat 3 or 4 cylinder 2 stroke diesels originally developed by Tilling Stevens which Rootes Group bought out post-war, hence the type “TS”. Aren’t they inspired at least by Continental practice, Sulzer? Hispano-Suiza?
    One of my uncles (ex-Ray Vincent) ran TS3 Commers and swore by them for power and economy. I always liked the tearing calico sound they produced.

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  6. Owen Woolley built her in 1957 for Max Burrett. Her original engines were twin ex-USN 6 cylinder Chrysler Crowns of 1943 vintage, later replaced, as Russell so accurately remembers, with twin Commer diesels when Ed Carter bought her c.1967. She was a Registered British Ship and in Lloyd’s Yacht Register so tracking her details is easy.

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  7. Recall is she was built for Bill Burrett in the 1950s originally had 2 petrol engines — American — Graymarine was probably the go, & they were replaced by the Commer TS3s about the 1970s. As vintage steamer says, reasonably well silenced, but you could still hear them — they actually sounded very similar to the petrol engines, which were not silenced — exhausts out the back above the waterline — KEN R

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  8. No stranger to me! Ed Carter had her in the mid-late ’60s and always wanted to put a frying bridge on her but never did. Owen Woolley did several bridge deckers of this sort of style. Aries had two Commer diesels that were reasonably well silenced and very smooth but just didn’t look like engines…

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